Nomination & Waiver Consideration

alusna22

Member
If you receive a nomination, which I assume would make you competitive, does that mean you are guaranteed waiver consideration?
 

usna1985

10-Year Member
No. Generally, USNA doesn't make a waiver determination until they are prepared to offer you an appointment, or are very close to doing so. IOW, your record is actually reviewed by USNA medical and a decision is made whether to grant you the waiver.

The above said, if you need a waiver, you're automatically put into the pool to be considered for a waiver (you don't need to do anything to be considered). However, your record won't be pulled from the pool and reviewed until USNA decides they're likely to offer you an appointment.

There appeared to be an exception to the above last year, when folks who were colorblind were given a waiver, but quite a few of them (on this site) received turndowns. I assume (but do not know) that the reason for this is that colorblindness doesn't require an individualized determination -- it's not like a history of concussions or asthma. Thus, USNA can grant the waiver and then sort out which (if any) of those folks will be admitted. There could be other conditions like this.

The point of the above is that being granted a medical waiver is generally a good sign, but not always.

Having a nom makes you competitive, but lots of folks with noms aren't offered an appointment. And that's the threshold for waiver determination.
 
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usna_app

Member
No. Generally, USNA doesn't make a waiver determination until they are prepared to offer you an appointment, or are very close to doing so. IOW, your record is actually reviewed by USNA medical and a decision is made whether to grant you the waiver.

The above said, if you need a waiver, you're automatically put into the pool to be considered for a waiver (you don't need to do anything to be considered). However, your record won't be pulled from the pool and reviewed until USNA decides they're likely to offer you an appointment.

There appeared to be an exception to the above last year, when folks who were colorblind were given a waiver, but quite a few of them (on this site) received turndowns. I assume (but do not know) that the reason for this is that colorblindness doesn't require an individualized determination -- it's not like a history of concussions or asthma. Thus, USNA can grant the waiver and then sort out which (if any) of those folks will be admitted. There could be other conditions like this.

The point of the above is that being granted a medical waiver is generally a good sign, but not always.

Having a nom makes you competitive, but lots of folks with noms aren't offered an appointment. And that's the threshold for waiver determination.
Hi just hoping for a little bit of clarification...maybe some inspiration too. (Haha very stressed)

Here’s a little background
A doctor gave me an inhaler when I was sick and told me I had asthma. Total misdiagnosis! Of course, dodmerb dq’d me and I was told that I would automatically be entered into the waiver process at usna. In December I received a letter that a waiver would not be granted however I then went to a pulmonologist and took a test to show I didn’t have asthma and sent those results in to the academy. Meanwhile I received a nomination from MOC. Then on Jan. 30 DODMERB notified me that I’m in the waiver process again and usna is requesting additional asthma tests to be taken and sent to them.

My question is, because usna is requesting these remedials, does that mean I am a competitive candidate? I’ve heard that the academy won’t even consider a nomination unless they want you or think you’re competitive?

Thank you for your time!
 

THParent

Member
If USNA requested a waiver then yes, they want to give you a shot. If you get the waiver, you are definitely back in the hunt.
Good luck!
 

SCMids

Member
If USNA requested a waiver then yes, they want to give you a shot. If you get the waiver, you are definitely back in the hunt.
Good luck!
The color blind waivers last year confused me. Our youngster is color blind. I knew that no more than 2% of the class could be color deficient. He received waiver in January 2016 and his appointment a week later. I was told at the time that they don’t request that waiver unless they intend to admit. Apparently, last year was different, or maybe I was misinformed.

His record was extremely good, and I found out later that he was the top of his MOC slate by a decent amount. Perhaps that did it.
 

usna1985

10-Year Member
The color blind waivers last year confused me. Our youngster is color blind. I knew that no more than 2% of the class could be color deficient. He received waiver in January 2016 and his appointment a week later. I was told at the time that they don’t request that waiver unless they intend to admit. Apparently, last year was different, or maybe I was misinformed.
It seemed that USNA took a different approach last year WRT waivers for colorblindness (as opposed to other medical waivers). Quite a few folks on this site reported receiving waivers on the same day. But most of those did not end up receiving appointments. The guess at the time -- and it was only that -- is that colorblindness doesn't require an individualized determination as do most medical DQs -- you either have the condition or you don't. Thus, USNA can simply waive everyone with that condition and, through controlling the number of offers of appointment to those who are colorblind, ensure that they do not admit more than the 2% limit. Thus, last year, a waiver for colorblindness was not necessary a good sign. No telling how they will handle it this year.
 

usna_app

Member
No. Generally, USNA doesn't make a waiver determination until they are prepared to offer you an appointment, or are very close to doing so. IOW, your record is actually reviewed by USNA medical and a decision is made whether to grant you the waiver.

The above said, if you need a waiver, you're automatically put into the pool to be considered for a waiver (you don't need to do anything to be considered). However, your record won't be pulled from the pool and reviewed until USNA decides they're likely to offer you an appointment.

There appeared to be an exception to the above last year, when folks who were colorblind were given a waiver, but quite a few of them (on this site) received turndowns. I assume (but do not know) that the reason for this is that colorblindness doesn't require an individualized determination -- it's not like a history of concussions or asthma. Thus, USNA can grant the waiver and then sort out which (if any) of those folks will be admitted. There could be other conditions like this.

The point of the above is that being granted a medical waiver is generally a good sign, but not always.

Having a nom makes you competitive, but lots of folks with noms aren't offered an appointment. And that's the threshold for waiver determination.

No. Generally, USNA doesn't make a waiver determination until they are prepared to offer you an appointment, or are very close to doing so. IOW, your record is actually reviewed by USNA medical and a decision is made whether to grant you the waiver.

The above said, if you need a waiver, you're automatically put into the pool to be considered for a waiver (you don't need to do anything to be considered). However, your record won't be pulled from the pool and reviewed until USNA decides they're likely to offer you an appointment.

There appeared to be an exception to the above last year, when folks who were colorblind were given a waiver, but quite a few of them (on this site) received turndowns. I assume (but do not know) that the reason for this is that colorblindness doesn't require an individualized determination -- it's not like a history of concussions or asthma. Thus, USNA can grant the waiver and then sort out which (if any) of those folks will be admitted. There could be other conditions like this.

The point of the above is that being granted a medical waiver is generally a good sign, but not always.

Having a nom makes you competitive, but lots of folks with noms aren't offered an appointment. And that's the threshold for waiver determination.
Hi just hoping for a little bit of clarification...maybe some inspiration too. (Haha very stressed)

Here’s a little background
A doctor gave me an inhaler when I was sick and told me I had asthma. Total misdiagnosis! Of course, dodmerb dq’d me and I was told that I would automatically be entered into the waiver process at usna. In December I received a letter that a waiver would not be granted however I then went to a pulmonologist and took a test to show I didn’t have asthma and sent those results in to the academy. Meanwhile I received a nomination from MOC. Then on Jan. 30 DODMERB notified me that I’m in the waiver process again and usna is requesting additional asthma tests to be taken and sent to them.

My question is, because usna is requesting these remedials, does that mean I am a competitive candidate? I’ve heard that the academy won’t even consider a nomination unless they want you or think you’re competitive?

Thank you for your time!

UPDATE
I received medical waiver for asthma 2 weeks ago.. I was a re look as I was denied a waiver my first time around (don't know if that matters)

I'm hoping this is a good sign but trying to not excite myself until a final decision on my application is made. I am still "complete pending review" on my portal.
It should change any day now right?
 

2MidsDad

Member
While waiver consideration or approval is a move in a positive direction, it doesn’t necessarily mean an appointment is forthcoming. DD got a waiver last year for a prior year surgery, and ended up on the wait list. Good luck!
 
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DD received word from DoDMERB in January that she was disqualified due to asthma. She listed on her application that she has an inhaler (but never uses it) as well as listed her medication that she takes in September to offset the allergies in the air at the time. She has always been active, running XC, Track and soccer, never has she been hospitalized and never has this affected her performance in athletics. Reading these threads shed some light as her Blue and Gold officer gave her mixed information. Seems like everyone who receives this news starts the process to get a second opinion. We are currently waiting on an appointment from USNA and feel like we should have requested the Methacholine Challenge testing in January. Since then she received the NROTC scholarship and we are not sure if she will be able to accept it..
 

usna1985

10-Year Member
It's tough to get a waiver if there's any evidence of "adult" asthma (after age 13). Unfortunately, having an inhaler (which suggests a potential need to use it) and taking meds, even if "only" for allergies, appear to have raised concerns with the medical folks. Usually, if another test will be determinative, DODMERB will request it.

Reading these threads shed some light as her Blue and Gold officer gave her mixed information
This is why BGOs are told to stay away from medical issues. Each medical issue is unique and, for privacy reasons, we obviously have no access to any medical data from any candidate. BGOs are given VERY general guidance -- i.e., adult asthma is unlikely to be waived as are things such as diabetes, history of cancer, etc. But we are in NO position to advise candidates whether their situation might be considered adult asthma, what medical tests they should or shouldn't take/request, etc. -- and shouldn't try.

Whether USNA gives your DD a waiver (and an appointment) is not binding on what NROTC does/will do in terms of a waiver. Thus, for example, if USNA were to decide not to offer an appointment, they likely won't even consider whether your DD's situation is waiverable. NROTC has already offered a scholarship; I assume that means they have decided to waiver her condition but I'm not that familiar with NROTC programs, so will defer to someone more knowledgeable on this point.
 

uncblue94

Member
Ms DS has a waiver for USNA, has received both NROTC and AFROTC scholarships, but is still waiting on the waivers for the ROTCs. Apparently they will award scholarships then pursue a waiver later. His follow-up medical appt. for the ROTC waiver is today. It's just extra stuff to go through.
 
No. Generally, USNA doesn't make a waiver determination until they are prepared to offer you an appointment, or are very close to doing so. IOW, your record is actually reviewed by USNA medical and a decision is made whether to grant you the waiver.

The above said, if you need a waiver, you're automatically put into the pool to be considered for a waiver (you don't need to do anything to be considered). However, your record won't be pulled from the pool and reviewed until USNA decides they're likely to offer you an appointment.

There appeared to be an exception to the above last year, when folks who were colorblind were given a waiver, but quite a few of them (on this site) received turndowns. I assume (but do not know) that the reason for this is that colorblindness doesn't require an individualized determination -- it's not like a history of concussions or asthma. Thus, USNA can grant the waiver and then sort out which (if any) of those folks will be admitted. There could be other conditions like this.

The point of the above is that being granted a medical waiver is generally a good sign, but not always.

Having a nom makes you competitive, but lots of folks with noms aren't offered an appointment. And that's the threshold for waiver determination.
Hi just hoping for a little bit of clarification...maybe some inspiration too. (Haha very stressed)

Here’s a little background
A doctor gave me an inhaler when I was sick and told me I had asthma. Total misdiagnosis! Of course, dodmerb dq’d me and I was told that I would automatically be entered into the waiver process at usna. In December I received a letter that a waiver would not be granted however I then went to a pulmonologist and took a test to show I didn’t have asthma and sent those results in to the academy. Meanwhile I received a nomination from MOC. Then on Jan. 30 DODMERB notified me that I’m in the waiver process again and usna is requesting additional asthma tests to be taken and sent to them.

My question is, because usna is requesting these remedials, does that mean I am a competitive candidate? I’ve heard that the academy won’t even consider a nomination unless they want you or think you’re competitive?

Thank you for your time!
Hello My DD received a DQ in December and has yet to hear anything regarding a waiver. We are anxiously waiting and have scheduled an appointment with a pulmonologist. Have you heard anything thus far. What additional tests did you have to do?
Thanks and best of luck!
 

usna_app

Member
No. Generally, USNA doesn't make a waiver determination until they are prepared to offer you an appointment, or are very close to doing so. IOW, your record is actually reviewed by USNA medical and a decision is made whether to grant you the waiver.

The above said, if you need a waiver, you're automatically put into the pool to be considered for a waiver (you don't need to do anything to be considered). However, your record won't be pulled from the pool and reviewed until USNA decides they're likely to offer you an appointment.

There appeared to be an exception to the above last year, when folks who were colorblind were given a waiver, but quite a few of them (on this site) received turndowns. I assume (but do not know) that the reason for this is that colorblindness doesn't require an individualized determination -- it's not like a history of concussions or asthma. Thus, USNA can grant the waiver and then sort out which (if any) of those folks will be admitted. There could be other conditions like this.

The point of the above is that being granted a medical waiver is generally a good sign, but not always.

Having a nom makes you competitive, but lots of folks with noms aren't offered an appointment. And that's the threshold for waiver determination.
Hi just hoping for a little bit of clarification...maybe some inspiration too. (Haha very stressed)

Here’s a little background
A doctor gave me an inhaler when I was sick and told me I had asthma. Total misdiagnosis! Of course, dodmerb dq’d me and I was told that I would automatically be entered into the waiver process at usna. In December I received a letter that a waiver would not be granted however I then went to a pulmonologist and took a test to show I didn’t have asthma and sent those results in to the academy. Meanwhile I received a nomination from MOC. Then on Jan. 30 DODMERB notified me that I’m in the waiver process again and usna is requesting additional asthma tests to be taken and sent to them.

My question is, because usna is requesting these remedials, does that mean I am a competitive candidate? I’ve heard that the academy won’t even consider a nomination unless they want you or think you’re competitive?

Thank you for your time!
Hello My DD received a DQ in December and has yet to hear anything regarding a waiver. We are anxiously waiting and have scheduled an appointment with a pulmonologist. Have you heard anything thus far. What additional tests did you have to do?
Thanks and best of luck!

Since receiving a waiver, I have heard nothing from the academy. If you private message me I can let you know more about the tests that I had to take
 
No. Generally, USNA doesn't make a waiver determination until they are prepared to offer you an appointment, or are very close to doing so. IOW, your record is actually reviewed by USNA medical and a decision is made whether to grant you the waiver.

The above said, if you need a waiver, you're automatically put into the pool to be considered for a waiver (you don't need to do anything to be considered). However, your record won't be pulled from the pool and reviewed until USNA decides they're likely to offer you an appointment.

There appeared to be an exception to the above last year, when folks who were colorblind were given a waiver, but quite a few of them (on this site) received turndowns. I assume (but do not know) that the reason for this is that colorblindness doesn't require an individualized determination -- it's not like a history of concussions or asthma. Thus, USNA can grant the waiver and then sort out which (if any) of those folks will be admitted. There could be other conditions like this.

The point of the above is that being granted a medical waiver is generally a good sign, but not always.

Having a nom makes you competitive, but lots of folks with noms aren't offered an appointment. And that's the threshold for waiver determination.
Hi just hoping for a little bit of clarification...maybe some inspiration too. (Haha very stressed)

Here’s a little background
A doctor gave me an inhaler when I was sick and told me I had asthma. Total misdiagnosis! Of course, dodmerb dq’d me and I was told that I would automatically be entered into the waiver process at usna. In December I received a letter that a waiver would not be granted however I then went to a pulmonologist and took a test to show I didn’t have asthma and sent those results in to the academy. Meanwhile I received a nomination from MOC. Then on Jan. 30 DODMERB notified me that I’m in the waiver process again and usna is requesting additional asthma tests to be taken and sent to them.

My question is, because usna is requesting these remedials, does that mean I am a competitive candidate? I’ve heard that the academy won’t even consider a nomination unless they want you or think you’re competitive?

Thank you for your time!
Hello My DD received a DQ in December and has yet to hear anything regarding a waiver. We are anxiously waiting and have scheduled an appointment with a pulmonologist. Have you heard anything thus far. What additional tests did you have to do?
Thanks and best of luck!

Since receiving a waiver, I have heard nothing from the academy. If you private message me I can let you know more about the tests that I had to take
Okay.. I will be in touch.
 

swrakow

Member
It's tough to get a waiver if there's any evidence of "adult" asthma (after age 13). Unfortunately, having an inhaler (which suggests a potential need to use it) and taking meds, even if "only" for allergies, appear to have raised concerns with the medical folks. Usually, if another test will be determinative, DODMERB will request it.

Reading these threads shed some light as her Blue and Gold officer gave her mixed information
This is why BGOs are told to stay away from medical issues. Each medical issue is unique and, for privacy reasons, we obviously have no access to any medical data from any candidate. BGOs are given VERY general guidance -- i.e., adult asthma is unlikely to be waived as are things such as diabetes, history of cancer, etc. But we are in NO position to advise candidates whether their situation might be considered adult asthma, what medical tests they should or shouldn't take/request, etc. -- and shouldn't try.

Whether USNA gives your DD a waiver (and an appointment) is not binding on what NROTC does/will do in terms of a waiver. Thus, for example, if USNA were to decide not to offer an appointment, they likely won't even consider whether your DD's situation is waiverable. NROTC has already offered a scholarship; I assume that means they have decided to waiver her condition but I'm not that familiar with NROTC programs, so will defer to someone more knowledgeable on this point.
NROTC will offer the scholarship, but wait on the waiver. There's always a chance that the waiver is denied after a candidate turns down other offers and accepts the NROTC scholarship. That can be very frustrating and devastating financially.
 
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