Question

mitch292

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Hello,

Someone told me that if one of your relatives such as your brother has recieved the purple heart that your chance on being accepted to USMA are increased I was just wondering if this is true or not if any of you know.

Thanks,
Mitch
 

futurewarrior

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I know that if a relative has received the Medal of Honor your application basically goes straight to the Supe's desk, but I haven't heard anything about the Purple Heart.
 

wpmom2011

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I think, but not totally sure, that if it's your parent that has received a Medal of Honor, then that will be considered your "nomination". I don't know if WP would still admit you if you aren't qualified in the other areas.

But don't quote me. When my d went through the process last year, I didn't pay much attention, because she didn't fit in that category.
 

Pima

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Medal of Honor recipients get automatic appt if they are qual. Seeing as all of the medal winners that would be eligile due to age req. parents are dead, they def. deserve it. I believe the children of black hawk down are the only ones eligible right now. I know that one did not have any chilldren since they lived on our block and the Seal commander was our neighbor who went in, the media was all over are neighborhood (Wife of the Seal did not know until sev. mos. later when he received the Silver Star from Perry...so top secret, that the wife didn't know what the medal was even for until the read the citation, she thought they were going there just to do some bus., after he got clearance he called at the hotel and said you need to bring the kids and get over to the Pentagon, she walked in and there was Perry)

As far as Purple Heart I am almost 100% sure that gives no weight. Remember a Purple heart is a whole different world in medals. Many survivors have one (no offense, I am sure they deserve them and should be proud), however, the Medal of Honor winners are typically given posthumeously (last one I believe was in 2005 ---I think the oldest would be a pre-teen right now)

B4 him I believe it was the black hawk incident and as I said the seals that went into recover their bodies did not get a Medal of Honor, although a Silver Star is special in its own

Also even if they gave it for purple heart, I am sure you would have to be a dependent. Maybe you know someone who knew someone whose father got a purple heart and they got into the academy...my guess would be that it wasn't the purple heart, but instead a Pres. nom
 
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Luigi59

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.....the Medal of Honor winners are typically given posthumeously....
That's correct.

Of the 847 awarded since the beginning of WWII, only 382 survived to actually wear the medal.

219 have since died, leaving only 109 living MoH recipients with an average age of 74.

The youngest is Sp4c. (now Lt. Col.) Gordon Ray Roberts, 57, the only recipient still serving on active duty.
 

LineInTheSand

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True, there are also a few other medals that have some weight to them...

The Gold Life Saving medal used to be one, as awarded prior to WWII, although I am not sure anymore.
 

Just_A_Mom

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As stated in federal law -
An unlimited number of appointments are available for children of Medal of Honor winners. They must be qualified by the academy but need no other nomination.

As previously stated the "unlimited" part of the equation is a moot point since MOH's are not handed out lightly and there just aren't that many children who are eligible. Most of the recent MOH winners from the Iraq/Afghanistan war are deceased and never had children.

There are 65 appointments available for children:
of members of the armed forces who were killed in action or died of, or have a service-connected disability rated at not less than 100 per centum resulting from, wounds or injuries received or diseases contracted in, or
preexisting injury or disease aggravated by, active service,
children of members who are in a ``missing status''
These are chosen by order of merit, by law. The academy's probably don't fill the 65 slots.

There are no special nomination or appointments available for candidates who have a sibling so affected. Having a sibling who served in any capacity also does not entitle one to a Presidential nomination.

What admissions may take into consideration is - a family history of military service and what your motivations are. Probably not a huge factor but if it came down to two "equal" candidates it could matter.
 

Pima

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Loved to know if LC Roberts had children who went...anyone know. Figure the children could be anywhere up to late 30's. If he had any his 30's the child would have only graduated lately
 

Just_A_Mom

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Thanks for the correction Luigi...

Paul Smith did have children however - a daughter and a son.

As of Nov 27th there are only 107 Living receipents of the MOH:
32 - WWII
14 - Korea
61 - Vietnam
www.cmohs.org
 
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Just_A_Mom

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yeah on the MOH website -
the photo and caption from 2005 indicate a 18 year old daughter and 11 year old son - cool stuff.
 

Just_A_Mom

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Ooppsies!!!

From my post above:
There are 65 appointments available for children:

Quote:
of members of the armed forces who were killed in action or died of, or have a service-connected disability rated at not less than 100 per centum resulting from, wounds or injuries received or diseases contracted in, or
preexisting injury or disease aggravated by, active service,
children of members who are in a ``missing status''
These are chosen by order of merit, by law. The academy's probably don't fill the 65 slots.
These 65 slots are not per YEAR but for the entire Brigade.
 

Pima

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5 yrs ago I wouldn't think that would be a problem since the pool would be small, I bet now it would be harded to get in, unfortunately for many reasons. Any child who lost a parent due to war, IMO, should get it. Afterall, I am sure these kids aren't willing to risk their lives for a free education. They know the hardship all too well.

I might be reading it wrong, but basically it is also stating that the purple heart recipient would be on permanent disability, again then this child has had to endure more than our s, and I would have no problem saying hand him the slot. I know our s desires the acad. due to his own personal experience, he understands the hardships, but he has been fortunate in not seeing that side. DH (Bullet) lost his "primary" crew mate when I was 9 mos. pregnant with s. The last time we had a loss in our world was in 2004, so he really hasn't lived the loss like other dependents
 
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WAMom68

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I might be reading it wrong, but basically it is also stating that the purple heart recipient would be on permanent disability, ...
Not necessarily, my father was wounded and earned a Purple Heart in Vietnam but does not have a permanent disability.

If the PH recipient did have a permanent disability from their service then their child would be eligible for one of these 65 slots.
 

Pima

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I guess I worded it wrong, what I was trying to state is if the purple heart comes into play, it is b/c they are permanently disabled.
 

ScreamingEagle

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Sorry to bring up and old thread, but I had a company mate (class of 2006) whose father won the CMH in Vietnam and got his appointment through it. He was a great guy who worked his *** off but struggled with grades and left yuk because of it, but later went on to ROTC to commision. But yeah, his father was pretty old for your average 20 year old, and I doubt that many there are many 17-23 year olds out there now whose parent won the CMH.
Just wanted to confirm that it does happen though.
 
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