Raynauds, while in AROTC

Discussion in 'ROTC' started by CarlyJ, Feb 13, 2018.

  1. CarlyJ

    CarlyJ New Member

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    I am currently an AROTC cadet with a 3Y AD Scholarship. I am 99% sure I have Raynauds Syndrome, and understand that it's a DQ. I have not gotten it officially diagnosed yet though. How would you go about this? I don't want to just give up on the military but I don't want to get caught lying. If I do get it officially diagnosed, are there any chances of a medical waiver being approved? I just don't know what to do. Would they allow it depending on the job I am given?
     
  2. AROTC-dad

    AROTC-dad Moderator 5-Year Member

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    Have you already passed DoDMERB? Has your scholarship kicked in yet? What year are you in? (MS-I or MS-II?)
     
  3. CarlyJ

    CarlyJ New Member

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    I passed Dodmerb a year ago, and did not bring it up because I thought it was completely normal. My scholarship has not kicked in yet, I'm an MSI
     
  4. wildblueyonder57

    wildblueyonder57 Member

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    I don’t have a decision yet from the Air Force but I had my doctor write a letter that mine was very minor. She looked for ulcerated digits which would show that there was a lack of blood supply in more than just the capillaries at the surface of the skin. All I have is that my hands sometimes turn white on a spot that you press on and they’re a little chilly sometimes. She happened to notice it during an appointment once and so DoDMERB found out about this really minor thing. I realize why it’s a disqualification now that I look at how bad it can be on google images, but I have to admit I was very confused initially as to why they disqualified me for that. I don’t know how major yours is but if it’s minor and doesn’t affect you your doctor should easily be able to write a letter
     
  5. AROTC-dad

    AROTC-dad Moderator 5-Year Member

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    I am not certain, but once you have passed DoDMERB, and been contracted, I believe that the Army will generally be more accommodating of minor health issues.

    Heck, my son broke his pelvis and radius after contracting, and his Cadre was very supportive while he healed up.
     
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  6. CarlyJ

    CarlyJ New Member

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    Mine go completely white and numb in 45 degree weather, and like my knuckles will hurt to move them. I can't really grip anything like I should be when they go all white. I don't think I can consider mine really severe, but I don't think it's minor.
     
  7. CarlyJ

    CarlyJ New Member

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    Raynauds is a PDQ, which is one of the reasons why I'm so concerned. Broken bones are usually Temporary DQ's
     
  8. wildblueyonder57

    wildblueyonder57 Member

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    I don’t really know then what to tell you since it could go either way- you’re kind of in a middle zone. Sorry:(
     
  9. wildblueyonder57

    wildblueyonder57 Member

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    I don’t think they ask about it though on the form? So maybe you’ll be okay?
     
  10. brob

    brob Member

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    You have not been diagnosed with this, you only suspect you might have it based on some things you have heard and/or read. If you want to be safe, I wouldn't mention it to anyone.
     
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  11. Capt MJ

    Capt MJ 10-Year Member

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    @CarlyJ

    Your health comes first. Take a deep breath, think about your symptoms, and their impact on your life. Don’t self-diagnose. Only a doctor can do that. It’s up to you to take the next steps.

    Second, if you have trouble gripping things while experiencing this, should you be at the controls of anything? Have hands on a weapon? Trying to cope with extreme field conditions that may trigger attacks?

    There is an operational and unit readiness reason behind DQs. ROTC’s mission is to train warriors who will not be a burden or a liability to their unit. That’s why the accession standards are so stringent.

    Whatever you do, don’t lie about it if there are direct questions that relate to your symptoms.
     
  12. brob

    brob Member

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    I'm revising my earlier answer because I do agree that if any of your symptoms could affect your readiness and ability to perform, then that could be a problem. You don't want to put yourself or others at risk.
     
  13. MohawkArmyROTC

    MohawkArmyROTC Recruiting Operations Officer

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    It you are suffering from symptoms at 45 degrees and lower, you will most likely have significant issues in the Army. You are exposed to temperatures below 45 on a regular basis, especially during Winter through morning PT and being in the field. All Army PT is outside, regardless of weather. Proximity to lightning and natural disasters are pretty much the only thing that will send PT inside. PT in ROTC is nothing like it is on Active Duty. Pretty much every night and morning is colder than 45 degrees most of the year in temperate regions and the desert. I have been stationed in HI, TX and Germany, and deployed to many countries and experienced temperatures that low at every location. Even HI hit below 45 degrees once in awhile at Pohakuloa Training Area on the big island.

    I am not saying this to scare you, but to inform you of the reality you will be exposed to.
     
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  14. AROTC-dad

    AROTC-dad Moderator 5-Year Member

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    Agree with Capt. MJ and Mohawk.

    You need to see a physician, preferably one with a military background who can ascertain both your diagnosis as well as your military readiness. If in the worst case scenario you are DQ, you will not have to pay back any monies, plus you are still only an MS-I and not under obligation yet.

    Don't delay.
     
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  15. GoCubbies

    GoCubbies Member

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    I recommend you see a physician just to ensure the diagnosis. Also, you will want to know if your Raynaud's disease has a secondary cause like some type of autoimmune disorder (e.g. lupus) or blood vessel pathology.

    If 45 degrees is your threshold, then you're going to be in a world of hurt if you want to be in the Army. Don't go to airborne in January, don't go to air assault school at Ft. Campbell in December, etc...