Recruited as a lacrosse player?

Discussion in 'Coast Guard Academy - USCGA' started by Cadet35, Jul 11, 2019.

  1. Cadet35

    Cadet35 Member

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    what scores/gpa would I need to be able to be accepted as a recruited athlete? I’m assuming they’re the same as other academies and normal applicants, I just thought maybe there would be lenience with a recruited athlete.
     
  2. Korab

    Korab Member

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    Have you had any contact with the coach? This would be a great question to ask him. At the Coast Guard Academy recruited athletes are held to the same academic standards in admissions as non-recruits. Those who are on the borderline academically may be considered for prep school.
     
  3. kinnem

    kinnem Moderator 5-Year Member

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    Same standards as everyone else at all academies. Similarly with their prep schools.
     
  4. NJROTC-CC

    NJROTC-CC Member

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    Same standards apply, but if you are in the lower range of acceptable test scores, being a recruited athlete will obviously help your overall application be more competitive
     
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  5. USMA 1994

    USMA 1994 Member

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    The minimum standards are basically the same for all candidates, but just meeting the minimum will not make you very competitive for the limited number of openings. Recruited athletes may be offered admission over an applicant more qualified in most other areas.
     
  6. jl123

    jl123 Member

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    USCGA may be different since they play D-3. Coach can give you insight on scores you need.

    Depending on sport/player, service academy D-1 recruits may be admitted with substantially lower test scores/GPA.
     
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  7. jl123

    jl123 Member

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    To clarify, recruited athletes appointed with low scores do not replace slate winners or Qualified Alternates. At least for USMA they are appointed as Additional Appointees - a category that, by law, allows for appointment out of order of merit. I assume the other academies have similar procedures.

    Also, many recruited athletes have excellent academic credentials.
     
  8. Korab

    Korab Member

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    There are no slates at USCGA. No congressional nomination is required.
     
  9. jl123

    jl123 Member

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    Does USCGA have categories of appointments that would allow a recruited athlete to be appointed out of order of merit without replacing a more qualified candidate?
     
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  10. Korab

    Korab Member

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    They appoint who they want. You are assuming a recruited athlete is less qualified than another. Who is most qualified is decided by USCGA and they don’t tell us how they decide that. I’m sure their ability to help a sports program is factored in.
     
  11. Korab

    Korab Member

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    By the way, approximately 50% of USCGA is recruited athletes. They are leaders on the field, in the classroom, and in the fleet. Don't fall for conventional "wisdom" that athletes are somehow less qualified. Many of them could have gone anywhere they wanted - many of them turned down D1 offers to attend the Academy and serve.
     
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  12. jl123

    jl123 Member

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    It is not conventional wisdom, but simply a fact that some recruited athletes are appointed with academic credentials far below other appointees. I can't speak to USCGA, but if consistent with other D-3 schools recruited athletes have a lower academic bar than other applicants. However, D-3 schools do not generally lower standards to the extent that D-1 schools do.

    I can speak to D-1 service academy standards: the USMA Class of 2019 admitted football players with ACT English scores as low as 16 and Math scores as low as 18; wrestling had appointees as low as 20 in both English and Math. No candidates are admitted with scores that low unless they are recruited athletes or fall into another category given special consideration.

    To be fair both the football and wrestling team Class of 2019 teams have respectable average and median test scores: English/Math - 23/25 average and median for football; 26/26 average and 26/25 median for wrestling. Also, several members of both teams had excellent scores and would have been competitive regardless of athletic recruitment.
     
  13. Korab

    Korab Member

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    stat
    Some students who are appointed will always have lower scores than other students who are appointed. Don't denigrate every member of a class of cadets just because some of them may have received some extra consideration. Special considerations are made for minorities, gender, and to fulfill the needs of the academy - its not a pure meritocracy.

    The statistics from USMA, USAFA and USNA are inapplicable to the USCGA. Since 50% of USCGA is recruited athletes, their institutional average SAT/ACT/GPA scores would be a heck of a lot lower if the athletes were as low performing as you suggest.
     
  14. jl123

    jl123 Member

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    I have not denigrated any member of any class of any institution. I merely presented a fact - recruited athletes at almost all institutions, including USCGA, may be admitted with lower academic credentials than non-recruited athletes - and supported with evidence that some athletes are admitted with far lower academic credentials.
     
  15. sanman

    sanman Member

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    I have personally talked to one of the recruitment coaches at USCGA. Recruited athletes at USCGA is a little bit of a misnomer as no one is accepted who doesn't meet the academy's strict admittance profile. The academy is looking to recruit well rounded individuals where no particular item outweighs another. JL123 you are saying that some recruited athletes are allowed lower academics, that could be rephrased to say some none athletes are allowed to join the academy if they have good academic scores. Rather we should look at the individual as a whole, not piece by piece.
     
  16. jl123

    jl123 Member

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    Academics is the most heavily weighted factor at all service academies.

    USCGA 2017 - 2018 admissions cycle
    ACT (25-75th Percentile)
    Composite: 25-32
    English: 25-33
    Math: 26-30

    25% have ACT composite above 32. Competitive for most highly selective colleges.
    25% have ACT composite below 25. Those candidates would not have been admitted to USCGA or any other highly competitive college without heavy emphasis on a credential other than academics.

    Recruited athletes do not have to meet the same academic standards as non-recruited athlete candidates, but high academic performers still have to meet the same rigorous physical standards. That's the price all colleges pay to field intercollegiate sports teams.
     
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  17. sanman

    sanman Member

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    In other words they look at the whole candidate. You can try and spin it any way you want the truth is that the academy is not only looking for good academics, they are looking for leadership, community service and athletics. For USCGA they are definitely cadets first and athletes second. If they could not satisfy the requirements for admission then they would not be accepted.
     
  18. Korab

    Korab Member

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    You assume that bottom 25 is recruited athletes - why isn't it prior enlisted or minorities or women or 1st gen college students or whatever other group admissions wants more of?

    How many CGA cadet athletes do you know? Get to know a few - I assure you that most of them aren't the dumb jocks you seem to think they are.

    Every school has a bottom 25% - you have no idea who is in it at CGA but assume it is athletes. That's the denigration I was referring to earlier.
     
    Last edited: Jul 15, 2019
  19. jl123

    jl123 Member

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    I made no such assumption. Recruited athletes is just one category that receives a break on academic credentials and since the topic is recruited athletes, I limited my comment in the above post to that group.

    As one college admissions counselor stated: "Do not look at the 25th percentile for any college. Acceptances with those scores rarely occur except for recruited athletes, minorities, and others given special consideration. If you don't fall into such a category, those numbers are meaningless to you."

    Note that I have stated that many recruited athletes have excellent academic credentials. Also, I have expressed no judgement on whether giving special consideration is right or wrong. I have merely stated facts to address the orininal poster's question.
     
  20. future.mil.mom

    future.mil.mom Member

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    To chime in here....My DS WAS a recruited athlete at the CGA. To the original poster....there really is no short answer to your question. First, seeing the "recruited athlete" process up close, I found there is a lot of confusion as to what a "recruited athlete" actually is. A true recruited athlete (where your athletic abilities in a specific sport would play a possible role in admissions) would depend on the actual sport at the CGA and how high up "the totem pole" you were. And if you were one of those, you would know it! (again, based on our experience)

    A recruited athlete would have a well developed relationship with the coach and would be able to ask that coach directly (not through this forum) about chances through the admissions process. And you would know how high up "your totem pole" you were. If your relationship with a coach is purely a few emails then I would suggest you are not necessarily a "recruited athlete".....in the way you are using those words in terms of influencing your acceptance into the CGA.

    Second, as has been stated in these previous posts, even if you are a highly sought-after true recruited athlete in a sport that may heavily recruit more than others at the CGA, you still have to get through admissions...period. But, yes, that sport can help. My DS did have his sport to "help" him, but he still had a very strong transcript and resume. His coach couldn't have "helped" him get past first base with admissions, for example, if he didn't have Calculus or Physics on that transcript....or if he had a 23 on his ACT....and he DID have the above-described relationship with the coach. Would he have gotten in without "his sport"? Guess we will never know. But I can tell you, while we know he didn't have the absolute highest test scores or the most AP classes, he had very high credentials. After all, CGA has a very low acceptance rate, is rated "highly selective", and is a Service Academy at the end of the day.

    So "Cadet35" the answer is multi-layered. At the end of the day, you need a real relationship with the coach (to be a true recruited athlete) and you need a strong resume no matter what. In our family's experience, the year my DS was accepted EA, we saw a highly recruited athlete get rejected with admissions (despite the relationship that had been developed) and we saw one get into NAPS. Again....multi-layered. Hope this helps.
     
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