transfer scholarship from VMI

Discussion in 'Publicly and Privately Funded Military Colleges' started by Army2022Hopeful, Sep 21, 2018.

  1. Army2022Hopeful

    Army2022Hopeful Member

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    I am currently a rat here at VMI. I was wondering if it is possible to transfer my 4 year army rotc scholarship to a different school after the first year. I plan on staying the rest of the year, and can tolerate the demands of the ratline, but just do not want to stay at VMI for 4 years.

    Any thought about the transferring of a army rotc scholarship would be greatly appreciated.
     
    Last edited: Sep 21, 2018
  2. VMI2017+3

    VMI2017+3 Member

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    BLUF: Wait to make up your mind until the spring. VMI has its reputation in the military (and especially the Army) because the system works.

    Alumni dump tons of money into VMI for a reason, it’s not because everyone hates it. VMI may not be for you, but just saying you don’t want to stay because “everyone” is unhappy is not a great reason to go. There’s a reason we’re all still here. To your point on the HC, if the only reason you’re not committing an offense is out of fear, you should reevaluate your values. You have the RDC about right...or at least how it should be (Rah). As little fun as it is, I wouldn’t want to be anywhere else...

    As for Army, I don’t know about that, but I’d guess since you didn’t pick up one of the scholarships the Army specifically slotted for VMI cadets, you could transfer to a unit that has space.
     
  3. Army2022Hopeful

    Army2022Hopeful Member

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    Thank you for your response. I re edited my post, I think it was too harsh. Perhaps not everyone "hates it", I was just saying that a lot of upperclassmen seem to be unhappy, and even miserable here. I understand that people look back on the vmi experience and wouldn't trade it for anything. I don't plan on making a decision to leave until after the ratline is over.
     
  4. Dadof2

    Dadof2 Member

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    @Army2022Hopeful, you are only a very short way into the Ratline. Your cadre and upper class cadets have a job to do with regard to your training, so your view of them and how unhappy/miserable they seem to be may be partly due to your current vantage point. Ratline is tough, no doubt and it would be unusual for anyone to love it, but it has a purpose which I think you can only see clearly when you are on the other side of the experience.

    As @VMI2017+3 said, VMI may not be for you, and that is OK. Just make sure you are making an informed decision. IMO I think it's too early for you to be able to make an informed decision. I think it makes good sense to complete the Ratline and get a years worth of college credits even if you decide leaving VMI is right for you.

    With regard to the scholarship transferring, I'm not sure you can do that, but someone with more knowledge will likely chime in. If AROTC works like NROTC you can finish the year and decide to leave VMI and your scholarship without owing anything. If you start your 3rd class year still on scholarship you will have to pay back the scholarship if you later leave AROTC.

    You seem like a wise young man. I wish you the very best, regardless of what you decide. For what it's worth, my DS is a 2nd and is happy at VMI. But I'm sure there are still some days when he feels a lot like you do now...
     
  5. Jcleppe

    Jcleppe 5-Year Member

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    @Army2022Hopeful, I agree with the others, wait to make a final decision until you are farther along in your first year. Use the Semester break to think about your options. I assume since you are asking about this that you have another school in mind, it wouldn't be a bad idea to at least contact the other ROTC Battalion to find out what your options are.

    In the end the decision will be yours, what works best for you and where you see yourself excelling, if VMI is not that place then move on. Above all do not just stay at VMI out of some thought that you will only get opportunities in the Army if you commission there, not the case at all. When you arrive at BOLC nobody will ask where you commissioned and they won't care if you tell them. It's much less where you came from and much more of "what can you show me now". VMI is a great school, but you need to be where you're happy and can excel.
     
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  6. CitadelN88

    CitadelN88 Member

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    At places like VMI + Citadel guys tend to complain, a lot! Funny thing happens over the years they guys who complain longest and loudest end up being the biggest supporters. You guys finish the fourth class system sometime in the middle of next semester right? I'd start thinking of bailing then ... trust me it's worth it

    That said Go Dogs! Beat Keydets! Beat Keydets! Beat the heeeeelllll out of Keydets!
     
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  7. Army2022Hopeful

    Army2022Hopeful Member

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    Thanks to everyone for your responses. I understand that I do not have the complete perspective of VMI at this moment (in the Ratline). I'll continue down this path and reevaluate after the one year mark.
     
  8. Falcon A

    Falcon A Member

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    First off . . . VMI + other SMCs + SAs are meant to be difficult . . . and it is every cadet's right to "b1+(h" (see what I did there) . . . ;-)

    Many upperclassmen revel in their misery while in barracks (it is a form of therapy) . . . but they proudly wear their VMI apparel when off post, as they should.

    I agree with Jcleppe to a point . . . VMI + the other SMCs + SAs are about preparation . . . and they will provide you a head start on your non-SMC/SAs peers when you enter active duty. Normal ROTC at a normal school can't prepare you the way an SMC/SA can. The normal school has other priorities. If I'm wrong why are there SMCs and SAs? At a normal school I believe much has to fall on the individual cadet for preparation. Wash out rates from the summer ROTC programs seems to indicate this. I agree that when you show up at BOLC nobody will care where you graduated from, but hopefully having gone through VMI, or another SMC or an SA . . . what you can do will be ahead of your peers.

    As far as "being happy" I actually don't subscribe to this view . . . "being happy" is in the present . . . sometimes you need to work hard and suffer a bit "in the now" in order to better prepare yourself for a bigger future goal . . . I'm always taken back by folks who say "college was the best time of my life" . . . I think to myself "how sad" . . . I can tell you "college" at USAFA was NOT the best time of my life . . . I'm very proud I made it through and graduated and would not trade it for anything . . . however the best time of my life started at USAFA graduation and has continued with each and every day . . . the best time of my life is NOW . . . and tomorrow will be even better . . .

    It is your choice . . . sorry to preach . . . just trying to give an additional perspective . . . talk with your dyke . . . don't make big decisions like this when you are tired . . . regret can be a terrible burden . . . Best Wishes
     
  9. glen

    glen 5-Year Member

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    So, the first year experience at an SMC - especially the first semester - is often accompanied with various levels of remorse. The experience seems to be the same through the centuries. For reflection, below is an excerpt from the journal of a Citadel graduate written during his first year at the South Carolina Military Academy in 1854. First year cadets were enrolled at the Arsenal in Columbia and if successful their first year, transferred to the Old Citadel in Charleston for their last 3 years:

    Excerpt from the Journals of Thomas A. Hugguenin ‘1859

    "This was the year 1854 and I became 15 years old in that November. The time had now come when some decisive course of action must be adopted, and without my knowledge my father applied for an appointment to the S.C. Military Academy. One day in December on returning from shooting with my father, the mail-boy handed me a letter, something I was totally unaccustomed to receive; besides this one was in an official envelope and had a very ominous look. My father knew what it was but said nothing and walked into dinner. As soon as I got to my room I opened it and found it contained, to my surprise, my appointment as a Cadet to the Arsenal in Columbia. "How well I would look as a soldier" "The beauty of brass buttons and gold lace." Everything was done to keep my spirits up and every argument used to show that of all places in the world it was the one I would like best.

    On the first of January 1855 I left for Columbia on the steamer via Charleston, arriving there after dark in a cold drizzly rain. On my arrival at the Arsenal I reported to Capt. Mathews the Supt., a gruff old soldier, but who I found out to be a kind hearted noble old gentleman notwithstanding his gruff exterior. I was assigned to Room No 11 bunk 47. There were two other cadets in the room McCaslan and McDowell, both from Abbeville Dist. A few minutes afterwards we were summoned to supper, and I found myself placed at the left of the Company (being the smallest) of 96 Cadets. We were marched into supper, and oh horror! I found myself seated at a pine table, without a table cloth, a plate containing molasses in front of me flanked by a chunk of stale loaf bread. We also had coffee without milk and sweetened with molasses.

    My heart full, I tried to eat, but could not swallow. I just sat there stupefied as it were. Just before we were ordered to get up one of the boys at an adjoining table threw a ball of bread which struck in to my plate and bounced upon my shirt and vest, plastering me with molasses. The tears rolled silently down my cheeks and small as I was if I could have located the boy there would certainly have been trouble. Marching out from supper, we were dismissed on the parade ground, then my troubles really commenced being the last to arrive the entire gang joined in tormenting me, until weary and angry I sought my room. When it was time to go to bed, I made up my bed as well as I could and tried to sleep, but what with the cold and my distress I laid awake for hours bathed in tears. It was certainly the most miserable night I ever spent.

    I made up my mind that it was impossible for me to stay in such a place after being accustomed to all the luxuries of life. The next morning brought no relief. I could not eat the fare, the cooking was so bad, the jibes and taunts of my companions were unbearable. I must have had a half dozen fights that day, and being the smallest and the youngest boy in the class I generally got the worst of it. My mind being made up I wrote to my father describing the situation in full, possibly making it actually worse, and concluded by asking him to send me money to come home, as it was impossible for me to stay. Thus having done all I could do I quietly awaited his reply, believing firmly that my request would be granted, and at most I would have but a few more days to suffer.

    This was the turning point in my life. Had my father yielded to my entreaties, I would have gone home and instead of obtaining an education and fitting myself for the battle of life which was before me I would have grown up a simple country bumpkin unfit for anything. A few days brought his reply. It simply stated that he had done everything he could do for me, flatly refused to send the money, winding up with the expression "if I left I need not come home" as he would not receive me. Nothing less than this heroic treatment would do.

    Up to this time I had from my birth virtually had my own way. I knew that my father was wealthy and expected to be provided for in every way not only in the present but in the future. Here then at one dash my hopes and expectations had been blasted. I was thrown entirely upon myself without help from any side. I was miserable. In a few days I received a letter from my mother, while approving of my father's action, it was filled with kind words and sound advice, placing before me the many advantages to be derived by graduating, and with the affectionate words such as only a good mother can use beseeching me to be reconciled and to apply myself. This letter so much in contrast with the stern and presumptory one my father had its effect, and I determined to make the best of it.

    In a few days I made many friends, some of them friends to this day. The boys left off greying me, and in fact I became a favorite and was petted and made much of on account of my youth and size. I easily mastered my lessons, and in April at the examination I was first in Mathematics and about 4th or 5th in general standing in a class of 96, many of whom were four or five years older than I was; this however was because
    I had been better prepared than many of them. On going home at vacation with this high stand in my class, I was received with open arms by all the family, "the fatted calf" so to speak was killed, nothing was too good for me, every wish was anticipated. Even the neighbors and friends of the family joined in to do me honor. It was the happiest month of my life.

    At the end of my vacation I returned and finished the year with my good stand. I was now very much encouraged, my ambition was aroused, and I felt confidence in myself and my ability. The following January I with the class who had passed the yearly examination was transferred to the Citadel and in April my stand was so good that I was appointed a Corporal! Oh proudest day of my life, when I heard my name read out by the Adjt. (afterwards Gov Thompson). I hastened to write the news home as I knew they would be pleased. As I expected a deluge of letters came from home, everyone who could write did so. My praises were sounded so that my head was almost turned, and when the gold stripe was sewed on my sleeves my joy was complete."
     
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  10. AROTC-dad

    AROTC-dad Moderator

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