Advice for getting MO scholarship first semester

Discussion in 'ROTC' started by pinkroyals32, Jul 9, 2017.

  1. pinkroyals32

    pinkroyals32 Member

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    Hey everyone,

    My entire life I wanted to be a commissioned officer primarily in the Marine Corps however I was rejected from every service academy and didn't get a NROTC scholarship so I'm going in as a college programmer. This summer I've been working out to try and max the PFT going in. Is there anything else I can be doing during the summer to help myself? And what should I be focused on first semester to get on scholarship?

    Thanks in advance!!!
     
  2. 5Day

    5Day Member

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    Grades, PFT and NROTC participation. Do your best to maximize your chances. Not much you can do over the summer other than focusing on physical fitness and of course getting ready for your first semester of College.
     
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  3. kinnem

    kinnem Moderator 5-Year Member

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    Agree with 5Day. Focus on PFT over the summer. Once you're there get excellent grades, volunteer every chance you get, and demonstrate leadership and commitment to becoming a Marine officer. Keep doing it every semester. DS didn't get a sideload scholarship until his sophomore year.

    EDIT: Seek guidance from MOI on re-applying for the 4 year scholarship. BTW, it's very unlikely you would win a scholarship your first semester. Perhaps during your second semester. You wouldn't normally apply for a sideload scholarship until some time in your second semester, after your first semester grades are available.
     
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  4. USMCGrunt

    USMCGrunt 5-Year Member

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    OP: you have gotten great advice above. One other subtle point... once you have proven yourself in the PFT, volunteered for extra details, done well in school and have "earned the right to ask," make sure you let your MOI and AMOI know of your desire to be a Marine Officer. You want their support and endorsement.
     
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  5. rocatlin

    rocatlin 5-Year Member

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    +1 kinnem +1USMCGrunt

    My son was in your position 3 years ago. He got the national scholarship on the early board.

    Bottom line is as mentioned... work hard, get noticed, and communicate.
     
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  6. NavyNOLA

    NavyNOLA Member

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    Assuming competitive standardized test scores and high school record, your PFT score, your personal drive/motivation/give-a-sh$t factor, and your ability to impress your MOI/AMOI will be your path to a 4-year National.
     
  7. pinkroyals32

    pinkroyals32 Member

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    Again thank you all so much for your advice. Senior year really humbled me. Getting rejected from all the academies was a rough, and I hope to identify my weaknesses, most likely my grades as I ended senior year with a 3.5 GPA unweighted and a 31 ACT. I hope to keep pushing my limits, and hopefully someday I will be able to earn the title as many of your DS's and DD's have.
     
  8. USMA 1994

    USMA 1994 Member

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    You may want to reach out to admissions at the academy and ask "what can I do to improve my application". Your test scores seem competitive and the 31 is 3 points higher than the average for this year's class at West Point. Even if you do not apply to the SA again, the process is very similar in terms of what they are looking for and the opinion from admissions could be applied to your ROTC applications.