Can I apply for a nomination from a different states senator?

Sean17

USMA, USAFA, USNA Candidate '25
Joined
Nov 15, 2019
Messages
69
If I live in New York, could I seek a nomination from a senator in say Minnesota?
 

MidCakePa

Member
Joined
May 22, 2018
Messages
2,214
No, unless you have a legitimate and lawful reason. Such as Minnesota being your legal residence.

Carefully read the SAF sticky above re noms. It’s thorough and detailed. Will tell you just about everything you’ll want to know.
 

AROTC-dad

Moderator
5-Year Member
Joined
Mar 14, 2014
Messages
5,725
What are the sources of nominations?

There are many sources of nominations; some are available to everyone and some only to certain candidates. The following sources are available to all candidates: Vice President, 2 Senators, US Representative. NOTE: You can only apply to the Senators and Representative where you are domiciled (i.e. one cannot choose which Senator or Representative to whom to apply for a nomination). Other sources of nominations include the President and ROTC/JROTC. Those living in the District of Columbia or in U.S. territories or possessions (e.g., Puerto Rico, Guam) apply to various officials in those areas. Contact your SA nominations person if you have questions.

Source:
 

Capt MJ

Ancient Mariner
10-Year Member
Joined
Sep 27, 2008
Messages
8,091
Read your elected officials’ websites. They usually provide guidance, and I suspect a MN senator as well.

Because I was overtaken by the spirit of Siri/Alexa, I googled “Senator Klobuchar service academy nominations” and read that applicants must be residents of Minnesota.
 

usna1985

10-Year Member
Joined
Jun 9, 2006
Messages
6,182
For those whose parents or legal guardians are residents of different states or districts (by virtue of divorce or being a geographic bachelor(lette)), and they SHARE LEGAL CUSTODY of you (regardless of where you live), you can apply to the MOCs from EITHER state or district where one parent is a resident. You can choose. However, you can only apply to one set of MOCs, not both.

So, for example, parents are divorced. Mother is military and is a resident of Texas. Father is a civilian and is a resident of North Carolina. Kid lives with Dad. Parents share legal custody. The child can apply from the district in Texas where Mom is a resident OR the district in NC where Dad is a resident. Not both.
 
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