DQd Today

ChoirDude

Member
My son just received notification that he is DQd due to:
History of airway hyper responsiveness including asthma, reactive airway disease, exercise-
induced bronchospasm or asthmatic bronchitis, after the 13th birthday"

His doc visit states he went in for a cough and wheezing 3 years ago. The notes specifically state "non asthma" and do not list any of the above mentioned conditions. Understand RAD is a sort of catch all term for anything that might be a particular respiratory ailment. He is currently a candidate for USNA, USAFA, West Point and has ROTC (Army and Navy) under review and I am very concerned this development.
 

Flea

Member
I'm sorry to hear that, my DD has her physical scheduled next week and we are expecting the same outcome. She was diagnosed at age 12 and used an inhaler for a couple of years. Did they ask for more information? More testing?
 

GoCubbies

Member
My son just received notification that he is DQd due to:
History of airway hyper responsiveness including asthma, reactive airway disease, exercise-
induced bronchospasm or asthmatic bronchitis, after the 13th birthday"

His doc visit states he went in for a cough and wheezing 3 years ago. The notes specifically state "non asthma" and do not list any of the above mentioned conditions. Understand RAD is a sort of catch all term for anything that might be a particular respiratory ailment. He is currently a candidate for USNA, USAFA, West Point and has ROTC (Army and Navy) under review and I am very concerned this development.
Any way you can get the notes from the doctor's visit 3 years ago?

When you get an AMI request, you can add that note. Hopefully, it'll say that he's got some respiratory infection and it's causes the wheezes and cough.
 

justdoit19

Member
Yep now is a good time to start gathering records. This is routine for the process gathering additional info for something they need to delve into further. It’s hard, but don’t worry! DODMERB is the first clearinghouse, and makes sense that they would want to explore this more.

Curious, what/how question was asked on the questionnaire to trigger DODMERB’s DQ? If he was never diagnosed with ‘any of the above’ stuff. Only from the standpoint of readers understanding the importance of answering the question only, as asked. No more. No less. This point is probably the biggest, stinkiest can of worms there is through the application process, IMO. Not saying this was the case in OP’s situation, rather making the point in general.
 

rholt

Member
My son eventually got a waiver for that same DQ. Passing along some good advice I got from user A6E Dad

If you have already send all your relevant medical records (when you send the remedial AMI), there's nothing left for you to do. You simply wait until USNA and/or NROTC initiates the waiver process, as described in the flow chart linked above by AFROTC dad. For USNA, they will not initiate that process until they are very likely to offer an appointment. For NROTC, I believe it is not initiated until after you are selected for a scholarship.
However, you can be proactive, and put together additional info that will support a waiver decision. My DS was DQ'd for asthma and was able to get a waiver, and is now a plebe. He obtained a methocholine challenge test along with new pulmonary function testing, and submitted those results along with a current evaluation, and opinion from the pulmonologist stating that all his records did not support a diagnosis of asthma (you would obviously need to pass the tests). Letters from coaches etc, that state current levels of activity without any adverse affects can be helpful, but are much less impactful than new medical data provided by a specialist.

In my son's case, we tried to be as proactive as possible, and make it as easy as possible for the waiver authority to render a positive decision. It is also possible that you could do nothing, and later on (maybe Jan or Feb) find out that USNA is initiating a waiver, and the may ask you do get the testing done. If you wait till they ask, then Navy will pay for it. If you do it on your own, then you pay for it. The risk is that it's possible that they may consider and then decline the waiver without ever asking for any new info.

best of luck
 

Impulsive

Member
I guess I am the curious one here......if your son never had asthma, only a cold, where did DoDMERB get the info he had respiratory problems from? DD FORM 2492, questions 31,32,and 33 seem to be only respiratory questions and refer to: 31-chronic cough or lung disease, 32- asthma or wheezing, and 33-unusual shortness of breath. Unless your son had a diagnosis from a doctor for one of these, there should be no issues. What was the DQ Code?
 

ChoirDude

Member
Under respiratory category he answered that he has gone to doc for wheezing in 2016. He had a cough for a couple weeks in November 2016 and so I took him to doc. Doc prescribed albuterol and antibiotic and told him to come back for followup. The doc's report specifically states..."wheezing" (not asthma) and does not reference COPD, exercise indiced broncho spasm nor RAD. The Master Chief for the NJROTC Unit at his school is also a corpsman and he stated he would write a statement advising that my son is a member of the PT and Raider teams, PTs daily after school and participates in Spartan and Endurance races and has never had any difficulty nor respiratory issues. We are working to get statement fron his doctor as well and the DODMERB rep told him he could submit his own statement explaining the one time wheezing issue and his level of physical activity. He also attended summer seminar and summer leadership experience this summer and did well on his CFAs.
 

NJROTC-CC

Member
Under respiratory category he answered that he has gone to doc for wheezing in 2016. He had a cough for a couple weeks in November 2016 and so I took him to doc. Doc prescribed albuterol and antibiotic and told him to come back for followup. The doc's report specifically states..."wheezing" (not asthma) and does not reference COPD, exercise indiced broncho spasm nor RAD. The Master Chief for the NJROTC Unit at his school is also a corpsman and he stated he would write a statement advising that my son is a member of the PT and Raider teams, PTs daily after school and participates in Spartan and Endurance races and has never had any difficulty nor respiratory issues. We are working to get statement fron his doctor as well and the DODMERB rep told him he could submit his own statement explaining the one time wheezing issue and his level of physical activity. He also attended summer seminar and summer leadership experience this summer and did well on his CFAs.
IMHO Question 32 is a poor question because wheezing from a bad cold is most likely not what they are looking for. Maybe, it should say "Asthma or wheezing (other than from a bad cold)" Did he fill out Section 85, which is the section to explain any "yes" answers? I would have thought that a good explanation that the wheezing was a one-time thing from a bad cold would be enough to satisfy the board.

I think every 17 or 18 year old applicant who fills out a DD Form 2492 should do so with his or her parents and that you should be very careful before answering anything "yes." Of course you must be 100% honest. But, it is difficult to honestly answer all the questions when it is not always easy to understand what the question means.

However, from what you report it sounds like you have a great chance at getting a waiver and it sounds like you are doing everything you need to do.
 
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Impulsive

Member
Agree with NJROTC-CC, ALWAYS remember to do this with your parents. If you answer YES to anything, you need to explain, and even then usually they will do a remedial and ask for AMI. I think the problem was albuterol, and if he submits doctors notes indicating it was a one time possible bronchitis (thus the need for antibiotics) that was not re-occurring nor chronic he should be fine. As we all go through this 'process" we learn, unfortunately the early stages of the first time we tend to take things literally and sometimes that causes additional work. When doing the medical portion, we first read DOD Inst 6303.01 and looked at the wording of the DQ's and a lot of them stated "history of or chronic" and not a one time, but when you answer honestly it likely will trigger a remedial, not a DQ. That usually indicates a "history of or chronicity", not a cold. I think you stand a good chance to get it resolved with the doctors notes and an explanation.
 

NJROTC-CC

Member
I even hesitate to have DS answer "yes" to Question 59: "59. Skin conditions such as acne, psoriasis,hand or foot rashes, eczema, or dry skin"

What kid has not had a pimple?

But Wikipedia defines "acne" as:

"Acne, also known as acne vulgaris, is a long-term skin disease that occurs when hair follicles are clogged with dead skin cells and oil from the skin.[10] It is characterized by blackheads or whiteheads, pimples, oily skin, and possible scarring"

(emphasis added to long-term)

My DS has some pimples, but my story - - and I am sticking to it - - is that he DOES NOT have a a "long term skin disease" as I understand that term. So the answer to Question No. 59 will be a very honest "NO". If he has too many pimples on the day of his DoDMERB exam, the doctors can deal with it as they see fit.
 

justdoit19

Member
I even hesitate to have DS answer "yes" to Question 59: "59. Skin conditions such as acne, psoriasis,hand or foot rashes, eczema, or dry skin"

What kid has not had a pimple?

But Wikipedia defines "acne" as:

"Acne, also known as acne vulgaris, is a long-term skin disease that occurs when hair follicles are clogged with dead skin cells and oil from the skin.[10] It is characterized by blackheads or whiteheads, pimples, oily skin, and possible scarring"

(emphasis added to long-term)

My DS has some pimples, but my story - - and I am sticking to it - - is that he DOES NOT have a a "long term skin disease" as I understand that term. So the answer to Question No. 59 will be a very honest "NO". If he has too many pimples on the day of his DoDMERB exam, the doctors can deal with it as they see fit.
As the parent of a child that has been treated professionally by a dermatologist with actual ACNE, you are correct. ACNE requires actual medication to treat. Acne is not pimples. OTC products will not clear up actual acne. It also pains me to see beautiful faces with actual acne. BC there are amazing treatments that clear it up quickly. Kids don’t have to live with acne.


Everyone has had a pimple. I still do on occasion.
 

Impulsive

Member
Question #59 asks "HAVE YOU EVER HAD OR DO YOU NOW HAVE" acne. If someone has acne now or ever has had acne (however minor) being honest says you answer "yes" to the question. A simple personal remedial statement on DoDMERB's form will clarify that the acne problem in question will have no effect on training, and he should be qualified without additional records or DQ's. @NJROTC-CC, IMHO, I unfortunately do not agree with you statement "My DS has some pimples, but my story - - and I am sticking to it - - is that he DOES NOT have a a "long term skin disease" as I understand that term. So the answer to Question No. 59 will be a very honest "NO". If he has too many pimples on the day of his DoDMERB exam, the doctors can deal with it as they see fit". It isn't what the examiner thinks, it is what may happen during initial training, maintaining grooming standards or wearing clothing or protective gear that may be an issue. And just FYI, be VERY careful using Wikipedia as it is not an acceptable source for referencing, people like you and I can modify, write "facts" and change the terms without any concrete evidence. That is why it is totally unacceptable for research papers or other scholastic or medical reference. The Mayo Clinic say "acne signs vary depending on the severity. 1. whiteheads, 2. blackheads, 3 papules, 4 pimples etc, etc". There is no mention of "long term skin disease" anywhere in the diagnosis or symptom sections.

Unless you are a doctor or a dermatologist, you are probably not qualified to say that as a universal statement, if Y then the correct answer is X. The candidate may have such a minor case and it be so intermittent that it is not going to be an issue, but to tell people listening here to ignore a possible problem, or make their own diagnosis is asking for future problems. Better to be forthright, do a remedial, have it in the record, and then not have to worry about it. Everyone is free to do as they want in answering DoDMERB questions, but I think to give advice based on Wikipedia is not prudent recommended advice. If in doubt use WebMD, TheMayoClinic, or the Physicians Reference Manual, those sites cannot be modified or added to by other than someone who is a doctor or research PhD.
 

NJROTC-CC

Member
Unless you are a doctor or a dermatologist, you are probably not qualified to say that as a universal statement
And,,,,,, because I am not a doctor, I am not qualified to diagnose him has having "acne" vs.just a few pimples either. If the DD 2492 form asked if he ever had a pimple, I would have to advise him to answer "Yes." My DS has some pimples. He just turned 15. He will likely have none by the time his goes for his DoDMERB physical two or three years from now (based on his family history.) I am not going to self-diagnose him as having "acne" vs. a few pimples whatever "acne" means. I am not aware that he has ever received a medical diagnosis of "acne" and is not taking any medications. Therefore, I will advise him to check no to Question No. 59 that asks about "skin conditions." And I believe I am being 100% honest. If he has a skin condition when he goes for his physical, they will catch it.
 

Wishful

"Land of the free, because of the brave..."
5-Year Member
You use Wikipedia for acquiring the corresponding footnotes of the sentence/paragraph you're interested in. Then you use those those footnotes as a citation or for further research. For example, in the Wiki post used for "Acne" above, there are at least 6 footnotes in the first paragraph which, when reviewed, draw from medical journals, i.e. The New England Journal of Medicine, etc. Link below:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Acne
 

ChoirDude

Member
My son was informed by his DoDMERB rep that he was welcome to provide a personal statement. We have not had any update as yet with respect to a waiver one way or the other. My son would like to go ahead and schedule a pulmonary function test in the event it is requested. It takes several weeks to get in with specialists so he wants to be prepared to promptly address the concerns.
 

justdoit19

Member
That’s sounds like a good plan. The good news, is that you are dealing with this early in the cycle. You have time to work through this.
 

ChoirDude

Member
His NSI who is also a Navy Corpsman and fitness coach wrote a strong statement confirming that my son has never had any respiratory issues and outlined his level of pt in a daily basis, during competition, etc.

Today a pulmonologist conduct a pulmonary function test. His score was normal with an FEV1 of 114%.

My question is....he hasnt been notified about a waiver for either service academies or ROTC Scholarships. Should this additional documentation be sent to Dodmerb to be added to his file?
 

Flea

Member
His NSI who is also a Navy Corpsman and fitness coach wrote a strong statement confirming that my son has never had any respiratory issues and outlined his level of pt in a daily basis, during competition, etc.

Today a pulmonologist conduct a pulmonary function test. His score was normal with an FEV1 of 114%.

My question is....he hasnt been notified about a waiver for either service academies or ROTC Scholarships. Should this additional documentation be sent to Dodmerb to be added to his file?
Hi ChoirDude, have you heard anything? Did you end up sending the additional documentation? My DD was DQd on Sept 10th for history of asthma, we weren't surprised and expected it. Dodmerb says it is Under Waiver Review and I am wondering if we should go ahead and send in her prescription history which I received last week. It shows she hasn't had a refill in over 2 years and at that time it was only filled as a precaution. Wasn't thinking service academies at the time!
 
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