Eczema... again

Discussion in 'Naval Academy - USNA' started by usnahopeful09, Feb 14, 2018.

  1. usnahopeful09

    usnahopeful09 Member

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    okay. You can’t make this stuff up.

    I had my first eczema flare up (minor) since AGE 11 last week. I receive an appointment to USNA the very next day.

    What do I do?? Should I notify USNA? I don’t want to see my offer revoked. Would they process a waiver request for me now that I have been accepted?? I’m really not sure what to do, and definitely don’t want to lie. But I also want to attend USNA and commission unrestricted (if at all possible)..

    Would appreciate any advice/ what you think could happen.
     
  2. ship_shape

    ship_shape Member

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    First question would be are you sure it is eczema and not just some sort of contact dermatitis? Have you seen a Doctor and have they diagnosed eczema?
     
  3. usnahopeful09

    usnahopeful09 Member

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    Yes. I had eczema from age 5 to 11. It is pretty much the same symptoms..
     
  4. usna1985

    usna1985 10-Year Member

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    I would check with a doctor first. Even if you are 100% sure in your own mind, you don't want to take any additional steps without a medical opinion.
     
  5. usnahopeful09

    usnahopeful09 Member

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    I will do that. If the doctor does say it’s eczema, how would I proceed? And would I be at a better chance for a waiver?? Sorry for asking so many questions. Just really unsure as to what could happen.
     
  6. Maplerock

    Maplerock Proud to be an American 5-Year Member

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    I don't know what to tell you. Never lie, but don't hang yourself either.

    You're not a doctor, but you have a pretty good idea it's eczema. Dodmerb has cleared you and now the old condition flares up.

    You've achieved something very special with an appointment and don't want to lose it. It's really a shame. You can live with it but USNA can't and wont most likely. This is a real dilemma. You are supposed to notify if you have a significant change. Is this significant? You think so. Once you see a doctor it will be official.

    You (and I) have a feeling about the right thing to do. It is a very sad situation. Good luck to you and keep that solid plan B ready.
     
  7. Skipper07

    Skipper07 Member

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    How bad is the flare up? Did you use prescription meds? OTC? Just moisturizer it clear it up? Go see your dermatologist. Perhaps he/she will classify it as “minor.”

    If this happened during plebe summer, or deployment, would it restrict you?

    FYI, I reccomend using Aveeno Baby eczema therapy moisturizer daily. I get dry skin during the winter that appears to be eczema but is not.
     
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  8. usnahopeful09

    usnahopeful09 Member

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    Very minor. No meds at all. Not even OTC. I just need to moisturize well, and it happens if I don’t take good care of my skin.

    Does this even warrant bringing up? I don’t know if I’m making this bigger than it is.
     
  9. Kierkegaard

    Kierkegaard Member

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    That sounds awfully minor and you make it sound like what you have is not a clinical disease. If taking care of your skin prevents the issue, then take good care of your skin and don't let it affect your life.
     
  10. Karensuzanne

    Karensuzanne New Member

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    I'm certainly not an expert, but if you don't need to see a doctor, I don't think it needs to be reported. The information I've read always says not to diagnosis yourself.

    About eczema- my son has occasional mild outbreaks as well. His last treatment by a doctor was two years ago, and we had no idea it would be a disqualifying condition. It was reported, and the disqualification was automatic. USNA and USMMA have already processed and approved a waiver for him. (He has an acceptance from USMMA, but nothing yet from USNA). It was a huge relief when the waiver was approved. Now he is waiting to see if other Service Academies will also approve a waiver. I keep telling him that reporting it was the right decision, because if it does cause a flare up, it won't be such a surprise.

    Good luck!
     
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  11. usna1985

    usna1985 10-Year Member

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    I don't know what the DODMERB qualification says in terms of notifying them of a change in status. IOW, what triggers the requirement to notify. If you don't meet the threshold, then you don't need to do anything.

    If you think you meet the threshold, then I would first go to a doctor to see if you actually do. And then I would notify. Why? Because if this happens now, it could very well happen again when you're at USNA. You may be asked, "Has this ever happened before since you were 13?" And now you're stuck. Do you lie to the MD in the moment? Or do you tell the truth and then admit that you lied by omission by not reporting it now? You don't want to be in that position.

    So, check what the requirements are and, hopefully, your situation does not trigger a need to report.
     
  12. davejean90

    davejean90 Member

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    Do not bring it up. If you have a serious occurrence later in your academy career, then just tell them what you said in your post. Military medical personnel are not in the business of playing "gotcha" and they will just try to treat the problem in front of them. They are not in the business of launching honor investigations about what you said or did in high school. The current DODMERB process misses far more than eczema. I have seen an autistic cadet/mid that was not caught until have way through initial summer training. I have seen another cadet/mid with eyes so bad that the size of the eyes were magnified to twice the size under the glasses. In both instances the cadet/mid was eventually separated.
     
  13. falconchic88

    falconchic88 10-Year Member

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    If it did not require medical attention, did not require prescription medication or OTC meds, in my opinion the condition does not rise to the seriousness of needing to be reported. This does not sound like you have had a significant change in your medical condition. Re-read the guidance in your appointment letter, I think you will agree.
     
  14. usnahopeful09

    usnahopeful09 Member

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    Thanks. So, what if, God forbid, I have a serious episode during plebe summer? If they ask if it flared up again, do I say it did but it didn’t require meds, so it didn’t warrant telling them anything? That feels kind of iffy to me.
     
  15. A6E Dad

    A6E Dad BGO

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    Nobody can tell you what to do, but you should be VERY careful self-diagnosing and reporting something that could be a DODMERB DQ.
    This is the actual text from DOD 6103.03, describing what is disqualifying :

    b. Current or history of atopic dermatitis (691) or eczema (692.9) after the 12th birthday. (1) Atopic Dermatitis. Active or history of residual or recurrent lesions in characteristic areas (face, neck, antecubital and or popliteal fossae, occasionally wrists and hands). (2) Non-Specific Dermatitis. Current or history of recurrent or chronic non-specific dermatitis to include contact (692) (irritant or allergic), or dyshidrotic dermatitis (705.81) requiring more than treatment with over the counter medications.

    NOTE - it's not just eczema, it'a all kinds of atopic/non specific dermatitis - or basically any rash. It needs to be "residual or recurrent". Also, for non-specific dermatitis (basically any kind of rash including allergies), it needs to be 'recurrent or chronic' and 'requires more than OTC meds'.

    Unless it's bothers you enough to seek treatment, or unless you are using some prescription medicine, and if it just goes away on it's own, I would let sleeping dogs lie.

    For accepted applicants, you are required to notify USNA if you have any "illness, surgery, or injury", I don't think what you described rises to that level.
     
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  16. Kierkegaard

    Kierkegaard Member

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    Somewhere between stubbing your toe and being paralyzed from the neck down is the line where you must report a medical issue. Where exactly it lies on that spectrum isn't entirely clear. My guess would be that if this is benign and takes care of itself without any medical attention then it's not significant, but only you can decide. Be honest with yourself and consider whether a reasonable person would call your condition serious flaring worthy of being reported. You must do what you feel is right. If you choose to report this, do so prepared to have your offer revoked. Otherwise if it's as insignificant as you say and you don't want to let it block your chance to serve, I don't think many will hold it against you.
     
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  17. SCMids

    SCMids Member

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    Your description of your condition does not match the criteria listed above. I would not report what you have experienced unless it worsens. You will not be lying. You will be following their guidelines.

    Also, you have been given good advice. Do not self-diagnose. Let this dog sleep. Good luck at the Academy!
     
  18. emwvmi01

    emwvmi01 5-Year Member

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    Just some free advice for OP. I think candidates get a warped perception of military medicine based on the DODMERB process. Candidates often see DODMBER as a screening process which it is in some ways. DODMERB helps the military make sure that the candidate doesn't have any issue which will limit/prevent military service before they assume the risk of bringing them into the force. Medicine once you are actually in the force/fleet will be more focused on treating/preventing but as the investment is already made they are not out to try and separate you over conditions they can manage. So if you are through the DODMERB screening and the condition won't prohibit you from participating in training at USNA manage internally and if it is an issue when you are USNA that requires more than your current OTC stuff go to sick bay. They won't be there in ambush waiting to throw you out. Most likely they will provide some course of treatment so you can continue training.
     
  19. ThePatternisFull

    ThePatternisFull BGO

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    If it is minor case. (IE not requiring a physicians appointment) I would recommend keeping this to yourself!
     
  20. usnahopeful09

    usnahopeful09 Member

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    Thank you.. I’m not going to lie, I’ve been getting two different kinds of answers and I’m not really sure which is true. Some say that if some eczema comes up at USNA (assuming I didn’t lie before), they will try to treat me and get me back going. Others seem to say that they will report me and I’ll have to be medically separated immediately. The recent post about the mid suffering from depression who was just medically separated 3 months before graduation is my worst nightmare (although I understand depression may be different than eczema).

    So I guess what I’m wondering is, which is true? If a mild case of eczema comes up at USNA, will they try to treat it and keep me, will they automatically separate me, or does it depend on the severity of the case?

    Thank you all again.