For those who got denied or are waiting

Discussion in 'Naval Academy - USNA' started by usnaalltheway99, Feb 21, 2018.

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  1. usnaalltheway99

    usnaalltheway99 New Member

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    If you've received a LOA, congratulations, I look forward to serving with you in the Fleet (I am still waiting). This post is for those still waiting on Decision letters and those who have been denied, which will be the vast majority.

    I'm reading the posts about everybody's denial letters, sure I'll get one too, but there is no reason to hope to be a part of the next class or even fret about your denial fwhich is a normal, even-classic, and really-common feeling). I hate to hear about people straight out of high school accepting NAPS offers or planning on reapplying, because They should question whether they really wanted to even be an officer. I like to use the example.. Harvard is for those who genuinely enjoy learning. If you don't like to go home and read or learn more about stuff, then you probably wouldn't fit in at Harvard. Why would someone trying to be an officer, wait an extra year to do it? If you don't apply to Annapolis strictly be an Officer, don't go. Everybody thinks it's prestigious until they are a student there, then it is just tedious and boring. So only go if becoming an officer is your genuine intention, not prestige.

    Here are some pros for if rejected and decide not to reapply to USNA:

    1. You'll get to join the fleet sooner than if you reapplied (and got in) bc all Annapolis students have to be there for 4 years

    2. You'll get to have a normal college experience: girls, parties, friends, etc.

    3. More freedom

    4. If you're still yearning to be involved with Navy during your college years you can do reserves (get paid) or NROTC (4/3/2 year scholarships;););) ).

    5. You'll have more academic freedom to study what you like, philosophy, German anyone??

    6. No summer obligationsssss

    7. Less strict routine during college, but same chance of success as a military officer.

    8. You won't have to seem like that guy or gal who carries the name of his/her college on his/her shoulder for the rest of his/her life.

    The biggest reason to for me not to reapply to USNA, is the ability to join the fleet sooner. I'm very serious about becoming a Naval Officer, so doing an extra year of college sounds crazy if it doesn't impede upon my career.

    I have also been told and continue to tell myself that just because you didn't get into USNA, doesn't mean you weren't USNA quality. I saw Mids help other kids on their online quizzes while visiting Annapolis and saw them, future "super soldier" and "ideal" officers, smoke and offer me, cigars. So remember, there is a difference between who is USNA quality and who is actually at the USNA, and USNA admissions has proven that they cannot decide that, only you as a person can.

    Please give these reasons some thought and accept your fate. Not going to USNA should NOT change your future or you never really belonged.

    P.S. REAL Studies have not shown Service Academy Graduates to be more or less effective than Officers from N/ROTC programs.
     
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  2. pleber16

    pleber16 USNA 2016 5-Year Member

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    While some of your points are valid, there's a good bit I disagree with being someone who did spend the extra year getting my commission...I think you're very much off base trying to dissuade anyone from reapplying to the academy if that's where they want to go...yourself included. Yes, it took me 5 years to get my commission, however that's one extra year of training and development compared to many of my classmates. And while I don't think my commission is any more valuable than my ROTC/OCS counterparts, there were tons of opportunities I got at USNA I wouldn't have been able to get anywhere.

    Biggest example, I went through the summer offshore sailing program all three summers I was there. Started as crew, worked my way up to skipper. Firstie summer I trained up my crew of all midshipmen (my XO was also a mid) and we sailed up to Connecticut and back. Hands down one of the best leadership development opportunities I've heard of. Had I not reapplied to USNA, I never would have had that experience.
     
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  3. usnaalltheway99

    usnaalltheway99 New Member

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    Thank you. I will add that these opinions are solely my own. I would love to have a leadership experience like your own. In my eyes that is not worth an extra year, but that is merely my opinion. My post probably was too biased. I intended to help other applicants with similar levels of anxiety ease their nerves. Do you think my post will be more offensive than helpful?
     
  4. wlkdead

    wlkdead Member

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    sorry.... i couldn't resist
    upload_2018-2-21_17-12-15.png
     
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  5. pleber16

    pleber16 USNA 2016 5-Year Member

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    Well, first off I wouldn't say your post is offensive, it's just perhaps a little misguided.

    I know a year seems like a long time now. I've been in the same position you are now and I understand completely. But I'll tell you it won't feel that long after the fact. If a year was spent doing nothing towards your development as a leader, yeah that year isn't worth it. If it's spend doing something productive, it's absolutely worth it. I'm almost 2 years out from graduation and I can tell you still, that extra year and deciding to continue with USNA, helped much more than it hurt.
     
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  6. Kierkegaard

    Kierkegaard Member

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    Although I appreciate your point of view, it does seem like sour grapes to me. If your goal is just to commission as fast as possible, ROTC is definitely a better option than reapplying. ROTC is a great program with its own advantages, while USNA offers its own unique opportunities like pleber16 mentioned. And 1/3 of USNA appointees have at least an extra year of either prep school or college, so it's not unusual. Personally the reapplication process taught me a lot and while I would have loved to be appointed last year, I'm going to be a smarter plebe this year in every sense of the word, and I'd encourage anyone turned down this year to consider giving it another shot if they're really passionate about it.
     
    Last edited: Feb 21, 2018
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  7. SCMids

    SCMids Member

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    The post is offensive. The kind of cynicism that isn’t needed at the Academy or the military for that matter. Still, if you serve, I hope it goes well for you.
     
  8. Humey

    Humey Member

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    I think we can all agree that an additional year isnt going to make a difference in a person's life. Reapplying a second time would seem like the thing do if you really want to join an academy. However, what about 2 years or 3 years. At what point do you stop. There is another thread and it was mentioned a guy joing the academy after finishing his third year at college. The guy is entitled to do what he wants and I would bet he is very happy he was able to get in even after three years. The question then becomes how many times do you apply and how long do you wait. At what point do you get on with your life and get into the military using a different route like Rotc or even OTS/OCS. It isnt my question to answer. Everyone has to decide on their own. There is another thread about a guy who instead of getting a pilot spot received CSO. He doesnt want CSO even if there is a chance of moving up to pilot. Everyone is posting how he shouldnt reject it and how good the job is and all of the opportunities that will come from doing it. It is sort of the same thing except its the Academy or Rotc. The academy may have closed it door to you but ROTC at a civilian college may open new opportunies. However, if you keep looking at the academy, you may not notice them. In the end people should do what they want.
     
  9. THParent

    THParent Member

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    My advice to you is to get that chip off your shoulder, if you want to be a Naval officer.
     
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  10. usna1985

    usna1985 10-Year Member

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    Everyone faces disappointments at various stages of life. In this new world where everyone gets a trophy for just showing up, failing to get into one or more colleges may represent the first real disappointment in the lives of many young people. I guarantee it won't be the last.

    Over time, we learn that sometimes we don't get what we want (job, promotion, raise, position on sports team, grad school, etc.) because we don't deserve it. We didn't work hard enough or someone else was better/smarter/stronger/faster. And, sometimes, the world just "ain't fair." IOW, sometimes it's not a value judgment . . . and sometimes it's exactly that.

    The above said, we all must deal with our disappointment. Learning to do so effectively is one of the key attributes of success. A key question is what "went wrong" and whether you should try again or move on. Figuring that out is one of the things that differentiates successful people.

    Here's an example . . . a swimmer who was US team captain. Obviously, absolutely terrific. However, there were two swimmers on the team who were demonstrably better in the strokes he swam. And only 2 swimmers make the team in each stroke. After a couple of years, he knew that, no matter how hard he trained, he wouldn't beat the other two -- they were simply better. So, he quit swimming and went into the financial world, where he has been incredibly successful. Disappointment. Moving on. Success. But not bitterness or regret.

    There's no "one size fits all" in terms of whether one should reapply to USNA (or any other school). The OP makes some valid arguments as to why ROTC or OCS might be a better option. Those who have reapplied likely have equally effective arguments as to why that decision made the most sense for them. Whatever someone decides to do, it is best to move forward and leave the bitterness at the door.
     
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  11. Old Navy BGO

    Old Navy BGO 5-Year Member

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    I'm sure the OP will get a lot of responses, but my $.02 (fwiw):

    1) There are alot of threads here discussing the pros /cons of a normal college v. USNA and other service academies. My personal view is that the USNA grad has a slight advantage in that they are better prepared when they hit the fleet, but the difference is quickly made up and the good ROTC grad and good USNA are essentially equal when they complete the first tour. That being said, first impressions count ...so that head start may make a difference in terms of Fitreps, follow on tour opportunities, etc.

    2) I don't think there is any substitute for the comradery and fellowship developed during Plebe Summer and 4 years at USNA. Sure, you will develop friends at a real college, but their is a bond among the entire Class at USNA. I see it every time I go back for a Reunion-- seeing someone for the first time in years and instantly connecting because of our common experience. This helps out in the Fleet as well...anywhere you are stationed, you are likely to know someone, have friends to show you around etc.

    3) Getting to the Fleet one year early doesn't make any difference. Yes, you may be in another year group, might get advanced a year early etc, but in the long run, it really doesn't matter. The Navy has been around for over 200 years ....one year doesn't matter.


    ABSOLUTELY ! There an awful lot of great candidates who don't get into USNA each year. There is no such thing a "USNA Quality" . However, Admission to USNA is highly competitive, and sometimes the other guy has something you don't. That doesn't make you a lesser person.

    At the end of the day, OP needs to do what's best for him/her. There are alot of pro's in favor of going to a normal college, and at the end of the day, you can end up in the same place. I would however caution against having a chip on your shoulder against USNA grads , just as I would caution a USNA grad to avoid thinking they are better.
     
  12. falconchic88

    falconchic88 5-Year Member

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    While I understand your sentiment that there is nothing wrong with commissioning through ROTC, I take exception to this statement. Someone accepting a NAPS appointment (my son) has no reason to question whether they really want to be an officer. That one year will be but a blip in the scheme of things, but the maturity and experience gleaned is priceless. My DH went to USAFA prep school many years ago. His SAT scores were nowhere close to where they needed to be for direct entry, but his goal was to serve and become a pilot. He went on to graduate in top 15% of his USAFA class, and then #1 in his UPT class, and went on to have a successful career in the Air Force. He never could have achieved his dreams without that prep school year! So, our son, proudly and unwaveringly accepted his NAPS appointment.
     
  13. Imboden

    Imboden Member

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    DS thinking if he doesn't get into one of the academies that he will do civilian college three years with his AP credits, then go OCS. Many that don't get in, find that civilian college is great, and still have a plan to commission. God has a plan for everyone, and you have to walk down the path laid before you.

    At the end of the day, my point to DS is that a year or two doesn't make any difference when you are 50 years old. His coach is telling him the same thing. If you want to attend one of the academies, and you don't get in, then reapply. The world is not going to give you anything, you have to work for your opportunities and be thankful for what you received. And if you put forth that effort, it will work out in the end.
     
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  14. falconchic88

    falconchic88 5-Year Member

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    Imboden, my very good friend's son went to a civilian school, got his civilian pilot's license while there, and was just accepted into an Air Force reserve flying unit. He will be going to OCS after graduation and then on to Undergraduate Pilot Training! There is more than one way to achieve your dreams!
     
    Last edited: Feb 22, 2018
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  15. Imboden

    Imboden Member

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    Thank you! That's part of my point that may have been poorly conveyed. I doubt DS will reapply if he's not accepted - he likes the OCS option. But nothing wrong with reapplying - very admirable. Just keep working toward your goals!
     
  16. Capt MJ

    Capt MJ 10-Year Member

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    The OCS/OTS path is a fine way to go, but he should also have his Plan B and C there too.

    OCS serves as a “relief valve” for the SA and ROTC pipelines. Need more officers to make up for unexpected attrition? Accept more into OCS. Getting plenty from SA and ROTC? Cut sections of OCS. OCS is also used to build out incoming accession groups to meet various goals. Need more IT majors? The Service shops through OCS applicants accordingly. Plenty of enlisted program applicants who now have their college degrees in hand, having worked hard after hours? Bring ‘em in, they are likely high achievers already successful in their enlisted careers. Already have a Master’s degree in something the Service is interested in, and the applicant is still under the higher age limit? They have a spot for them. OCS and OTS are highly competitive in their own way, with more applicants than there are class spots. It is, though, pretty much the last shot.

    If your DS has any interest in nuclear engineering, don’t overlook NUPOC, a route to a commission that allows for “normal” college. Of course, it is highly competitive as well.


    https://www.navy.com/joining/college-options/nupoc.html
     
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  17. 0302grnt

    0302grnt Member

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    Me thinks thou hath spent but little time in Cambridge, MA.
     
  18. JRS92078

    JRS92078 Member

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    I understand completely what you are trying to convey. My DS Original Plan A was to attend Regular University and join ROTC. All of his college visits he scheduled visits with the ROTC Programs. When the plan he thought he had Absolutely NO SHOT at came calling. However, due to his test scores and slightly lower GPA his shot at his dream is via the Prep School. My DS accepted his offer to Prep (USAFA Prep) without hesitation. I have no doubt his desire to Commission and Serve his country will be achieved no matter which route - there are MANY to obtain your end goal. Everyone we/he has spoken with at all the Academies has said that Firstie/Doolie year the Preppies had it so much easier and for those who end up with one as a roommate they were super lucky. Even a recent Grad from last year said if he had it to do over and was offered Prep he would absolutely choose that option. He said the Prep kids are so much more prepared than the kids getting Direct Entry. It's not for everyone and not everyone gets that option. If it is offered to you, you should consider it as an honor and definitely not a wasted year.
    Wish you all the best. The waiting is rough. Hang in there.
     
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  19. Humey

    Humey Member

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    Just because you genuninely learning doesn mean a place like Harvard or MIT is a good fit. That is a whole other world and not everyone is made for that kind of environment.
     
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  20. 0302grnt

    0302grnt Member

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    Harvard has a truly astonishingly diverse, worldwide student population. They are all capable students and bring something exceptional to the University; however, it should come as no surprise that not all Harvard students "love" book learning; moreover, there are many there who could not handle the rigors of USNA. Having said that, one of the finest Marine officers with whom I served in the FMF was a Harvard man.