How does MOC work?

kp1368

Member
I see on the class of 22 thread that an appointment has already been given in our congressional district. Does this mean my child won't receive an appointment?
 

Kierkegaard

Member
This is a common question, and the answer is it is still possible to be accepted, since appointments can be charged to a variety of slots depending on the appointee's nomination sources.
 

kp1368

Member
This is a common question, and the answer is it is still possible to be accepted, since appointments can be charged to a variety of slots depending on the appointee's nomination sources.
I'm not sure what you mean by "depending on the appointee's nomination sources: and "can be charged to a variety of slots." Can you give some examples ?
 

usna1985

10-Year Member
Candidates can be charged to the other MOCs, President, ROTC, SecNav, etc. So, on a slate of 10 candidates for MOC 1, candidate A could be charged to MOC 1, candidate B to the President (assuming B has a Pres nom), candidate C could be selected out of the National Pool and be charged to SecNav, Candidate D could be charged to a different MOC from which he has a nom, Candidate E could be charged to NROTC (if she has an NROTC nom), etc.
 

jl123

Member
I see on the class of 22 thread that an appointment has already been given in our congressional district. Does this mean my child won't receive an appointment?
The knowledge that someone was appointed from your district is meaningless to your child's chances without knowing the other candidate's status. Some possible scenarios assuming your child only has a nomination from this MOC:

1. Appointee is determined to be the "slate winner" and accepts appointment. Your child will compete with others on NWL for appointment as Qualified Alternate or Additional Appointee. To confuse you more - if appointee declines appointment, academy is not required to offer appointment to next in line in district, although that is what usually happens..

2. Appointee is a recruited athlete and not slate winner. No impact on your child's chances.

3. Appointee has one or more nominations from other sources - Senate, Presidential, VP, etc. May or may not impact your child's chances. USNA may choose to use one of those other nominations for the appointee.
 

Rescue#1

Member
Don’t forget that your MOC can have 5 appointees in the USNA at any one time. So some years for any variety of reasons he can have 2 slates, assuming he submits competitively.
 

believe2023

Member
Don’t forget that your MOC can have 5 appointees in the USNA at any one time. So some years for any variety of reasons he can have 2 slates, assuming he submits competitively.
How can we find out how many our MOC have in the USNA at this time?
 

jl123

Member
Don’t forget that your MOC can have 5 appointees in the USNA at any one time. So some years for any variety of reasons he can have 2 slates, assuming he submits competitively.
How can we find out how many our MOC have in the USNA at this time?
Call the MOCs office and ask how many vacancies there are for the upcoming year.

The method of submission doesn’t affect the vacancies or number of slates.
 

kp1368

Member
Don’t forget that your MOC can have 5 appointees in the USNA at any one time. So some years for any variety of reasons he can have 2 slates, assuming he submits competitively.
How can we find out how many our MOC have in the USNA at this time?
Call the MOCs office and ask how many vacancies there are for the upcoming year.

The method of submission doesn’t affect the vacancies or number of slates.
So if all five slates are filled, does my child go into the National Pool for competition ?
 

falconchic88

10-Year Member
kp, your child must have a nomination and be fully qualified to go to the National Pool. There are not always 5 slates. Most years there is only 1 slate. Some years there may be more than one. The MOCs can have 5 at each Academy at one time, not every year. SO if he has one in each class, firstie through Plebe, that leaves one or two for the incoming class, since the graduating firstie will open up a slot. Some times an appointee leaves an academy before they graduate, or the slate winner chooses not to accept the appointment, these examples leave extra openings for the MOC, so MOC may choose to nominate more than one slate to match the number of vacancies they have.

Generally speaking, if your child does not win his or her slate, they will go to the national pool if deemed fully qualified.
 

time2

10-Year Member
Each MOC can submit 10 NOM's for each opening they have. Where a NOM gets issued my not be where USNA eventually charges it, so there is nothing to be gained by trying to figure out where someone's NOM got charged. This year's deadline for NOM's has already passed, so there really is no point in calling your MOC at this time. If your MOC accepted applications during this cycle, then you can assume they had at least one opening. If you are new to this process, I would focus on the big picture and not get overly wrapped up in fine details over which you have no control. There are lot of older threads that talk about the NOM process.
 

jl123

Member
So if all five slates are filled, does my child go into the National Pool for competition ?
That situation does not happen. Vacancies are monitored closely to ensure that each MOC has at least one vacancy every year.

In the extremely unlikely scenario where a MOC has no vacancies, candidates in that district would not even be able to compete in the national pool unless they had a nomination from another source. No nomination = No appointment.
 

usna1985

10-Year Member
That situation does not happen. Vacancies are monitored closely to ensure that each MOC has at least one vacancy every year.
Actually, it can happen. All of the SAs do everything they can to ensure it doesn't. However, at the end of the day, MOCs control their nomination process. There have been RARE occasions where an MOC has no vacancies for a particular SA for a particular year. Sadly, it most often happens when an MOC has been defeated and wants to [I'll let you insert the verb] the person succeeding him/her. But it is very, very rare.
 
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