How Long Do LOAs Typically Take From CPR to Recieved

LwRower45

New Member
I am aware that they are extremely difficult to acquire, and unpredictable whether one will earn one or not, but I am just looking for a rough estimate of time from when a candidate goes from CPR to when they receive a letter. Is there a certain time of academic year, when more LOAs are given for recruited athletes and they shift to normal candidates.

Thank you!
 

Capt MJ

10-Year Member
There is no way to accurately answer your question. LOAs are used as a tool by Admissions in various ways, at various times, for various reasons, to meet various goals in filling out the class. They might give one very early in the cycle to someone who meets certain criteria and might be lacking a nom, or very late in the cycle, to let someone know they are definitely in play for an offer.

The goal is the offer of appointment. I recommend using the time spent speculating about the LOA unicorn in fleshing out your alternative plans, enjoying family and friends and senior year, presumably in your last year of living full-time at home.
 

MidCakePa

Member
Building on @Capt MJ: We’ve already seen a couple posts about LOAs just received. But then, DD got one just three days before the national decision day of May 1 (alongside one in February and one in March). Not much logic there, so don’t worry about it.
 

brewmeist

Member
There is nothing typical about an LOA.

I know many people think that an LOA will alleviate a lot of anxiety, but it doesn't. The same anxiety will be there waiting for an appointment, LOA or no LOA. Candidates would do themselves a great service if they would stop thinking about LOAs.
 
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PapaMedic

Member
The best words of advice our DD (class of ‘23) got from her BGO were “forget about an LOA”. Her focus was on the Appointment from day 1. Her applicant number was in the 20s, her app went CPR on 8/22/18, and she got the call from our MOC on 3/21/19. Best of luck to you!
 
There is nothing typical about an LOA.

I know many people think that an LOA will alleviate a lot of anxiety, but it doesn't. The same anxiety will be there waiting for an appointment, LOA or no LOA. Candidates would do themselves a great service if they would stop thinking about LOAs.
I think I will respectfully disagree with this post. I understand where you are coming from, but it seems to me through this forum and my own past posts, that any indication of how competitive you are as a candidate from admissions is a great reliever of stress. A fair amount of people are on this forum, it seems, to understand whether or not they are competitive for admission and what they can do to be more competitive.

When I received my LOA, although I know it is not a guaranteed appointment, I at least knew that I was doing something right which definitely alleviated anxiety. I do, however, agree that most people should not be so focused on LOAs if they are not highly recruited athletes. You most likely won't get one.
 
I think I will respectfully disagree with this post. I understand where you are coming from, but it seems to me through this forum and my own past posts, that any indication of how competitive you are as a candidate from admissions is a great reliever of stress. A fair amount of people are on this forum, it seems, to understand whether or not they are competitive for admission and what they can do to be more competitive.

When I received my LOA, although I know it is not a guaranteed appointment, I at least knew that I was doing something right which definitely alleviated anxiety. I do, however, agree that most people should not be so focused on LOAs if they are not highly recruited athletes. You most likely won't get one.
I agree. With respect to those on here who have a vested interest in helping folks stay calm and focused, etc., the “A” on LOA does stand for assurance. It is certainly the case that an LOA can alleviate some anxiety. As I recall, DS’ (‘20) letter indicates that he would receive an appointment provided certain specific additional criteria were met. I believe in his case it was DoDMERB, which he had not yet cleared. I can’t remember if he had received a nom yet or not. Now, while it’s true that an LOA should not be one’s goal and it’s also true that a lot can happen (or perhaps more appropriately, not happen) to prevent one from going from LOA to appointment, isn’t it also true that an LOA indicates that one has cleared the “college admissions”-type hurdle upon receiving an LOA? That, to me, seems to relieve an awful lot of anxiety. What am I missing?
 
In response to your question I waited a little bit less than a week for an LOA, but I agree with everyone else that although it's nice to have I'm not particularly relieved because I need a DODMERB waiver. So I would try not to hyper focus on getting an LOA because its not the end of the road. Good luck though!!
 

NavyHoops

Super Moderator
5-Year Member
CPR to LOA timeline will vary for every person. Technically one doesn’t need to be CPR to get an LOA. You won’t know when your package is reviewed. I had a highly qualified candidate finished in August of last year. Heard in late March even though I know his package was reviewed in Sept. Most LOAs occur prior to Jan as at that point most have noms figured out and waivers worked out (not in all cases in either). There are always candidates on this forum each year with LOAs waiting for appointments in April as they have waivers still to process and some might not have secured a Nom with a MOC. It’s why we say an LOA is nice, but it’s not the finish line. Mentally prepare to hear in April. If you hear prior, then it’s event better
 
This is different for everyone and depends on the state and MOC, but as another data point for a timeline... Last year, my son was CPR in October, received LOA 1 week later, received nomination in early December, appointment offered in January (4+ weeks after nomination).
 
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