Impact of LOA on appointment from nomination panel?

Discussion in 'Nominations' started by 22bravo, Jan 8, 2018.

  1. 22bravo

    22bravo Member

    Joined:
    Oct 24, 2017
    Messages:
    10
    Likes Received:
    2
    I tried to google this and find an answer, but to no avail.

    If only one of the recipients of a nomination has an LOA, does that candidate automatically get the congressional or senatorial appointment? And let's say for clarity that the LOA recipient has only been successful in getting a nom from one source. I've read that when more than one candidate on a panel has an LOA, they'll find nomination sources for the various candidates (such as from the NWL) ... but my question is whether the LOA means the recipient will automatically get the appointment from a nom panel if s/he is the only one with an LOA.
     
    USMAbuckeye and ncnordicfamily like this.
  2. kinnem

    kinnem Moderator 5-Year Member

    Joined:
    Oct 21, 2010
    Messages:
    10,333
    Likes Received:
    3,896
    If someone with an LOA gets a nomination then they will receive an appointment. Who it gets charged to is a totally different subject and is also of no matter.
     
    ncnordicfamily likes this.
  3. time2

    time2 10-Year Member

    Joined:
    Jul 17, 2007
    Messages:
    1,633
    Likes Received:
    647
    ^^ I agree. Having an LOA is no guarantee the MOC will give you a NOM, you still have to earn it. Those are 2 separate processes. You need a NOM along with having the LOA (and meeting any specified contingencies) to receive an appointment. You will read all sort of random things about SA's, mostly from people who have no idea what they are talking about when doing generic google searches.
     
    stsay and USMAbuckeye like this.
  4. 22bravo

    22bravo Member

    Joined:
    Oct 24, 2017
    Messages:
    10
    Likes Received:
    2
    I was just curious about the impact of the LOA on the other candidates on the nomination panel -- and whether you can tell whether your nomination source is actually already going to go to someone with an LOA. I get that if you are the one holding the LOA, the nomination source to which you are charged doesn't matter. But if you know another person on the panel has an LOA and you do not, does it automatically mean the nomination is going to go to the LOA holder, so that the other folks on the panel are out of luck?
     
  5. davejean90

    davejean90 Member

    Joined:
    Aug 18, 2015
    Messages:
    144
    Likes Received:
    104
    The reasons you got the LOA should make you a strong candidate for a nomination. However, same state admission reps have greater influence over the nomination process than others and that may affect how many nominations you get and where they come from. For example if you get an LOA and an ROTC nomination, some state admission reps will recommend that other strong candidates without LOAs receive the MOC nominations. Theoretically this will allow greater state representation as the ROTC nomination does not take up a state slot. Also, if you get one from your house representative, more influential state admission reps may ensure you do not receive one of the two senate slots. The house slot was all you needed to get in, so there is no need to send a strong message with a state-wide senate nomination.
     
  6. usna1985

    usna1985 10-Year Member

    Joined:
    Jun 9, 2006
    Messages:
    5,373
    Likes Received:
    1,848
    The OP appears to be confusing the concept of getting an appointment and the entity to whom that appointment is charged. Let me break down your question and try to answer it piece by piece.

    I assume you're referring to the MOC slate. If one person on the slate submitted by the MOC has an LOA, that person will receive an appointment. That appointment may or may not be charged to that MOC. Thus, it is possible for others on the slate to receive appointments in addition to the LOA recipient.

    An LOA recipient only needs a nom from one source. The LOA contingency is receiving "a" nomination. The source is irrelevant. As stated above, once the LOA recipient has a nom, he/she is guaranteed an appointment (if CFA/medical ok). That candidate may well be charged against that MOC (especially if the MOC gives the LOA recipient a principal nom) but it need not be the case. The LOA candidate could be charged to another source.

    I don't really understand the question. If you're asking what happens if the MOC nominates two candidates with LOAs, the answer is that both will get appointments. One may be charged to the MOC. The other will be charged to another source. Both might be charged to another source. They don't go into the NWL/National Pool -- that group is made up non-LOA folks who secured a nom but didn't win their slate. An LOA recipient has a nom, so has an appointment, so doesn't go to the National Pool; rather, USNA must find a source to which to charge that candidate. This, BTW, is why USNA limits the number of LOAs because giving out too many wreaks havoc with the appointment process.

    If you're asking what happens if the LOA candidate doesn't secure any nom from any source on his/her own, the likely outcome today is a turndown. There can be rare exceptions if USNA really, really wants that candidate. But again, the candidate won't go into the NWL/National Pool.

    If you're asking whether the MOC must give a nomination to an LOA recipient, the answer is definitely no. They usually do b/c: (1) the candidate is probably very well qualified and (2) the MOC knows that if he/she gives a nom to that candidate, that candidate will be appointed. And MOCs want as many folks as possible from their districts to receive appointments -- well, most MOCs do.:rolleyes:

    If you're asking whether the LOA recipient will automatically be charged to that MOC . . . see the answers above.
     
    Last edited: Jan 10, 2018
  7. GoArmy2022

    GoArmy2022 USMA 2022

    Joined:
    Oct 29, 2017
    Messages:
    398
    Likes Received:
    317
    Thank you for lending us candidates and parents your wisdom @usna1985. The pieces of information above are extremely helpful.
     
  8. 22bravo

    22bravo Member

    Joined:
    Oct 24, 2017
    Messages:
    10
    Likes Received:
    2
    So, so helpful. Thanks USNA1985!
     
  9. Amazed

    Amazed Member

    Joined:
    Nov 16, 2017
    Messages:
    109
    Likes Received:
    88
    Many thanks for the clarification. My DD has a nom from our congressman and I know for a fact that at least 1 of the others who was nominated has a LOA. So I was pretty devastated and trying to figure out how to tell my DD. But after reading the explanation above, I'm not sure I have anything to say to her, as it doesn't automatically mean she cannot win our congressman's slate. This kid with the LOA isn't sure if they will go to USNA though.

    However, a kid in DD's school is a nationally rated athlete and he already signed up with USNA. So that's a 2nd kid in our congressional district-- I wonder how many they would take from the same congressional district? Also, if you're a recruited athlete (like this kid) do you "need" a nom because there are pictures on the school website of this kid signing up for USNA back in like Sept/Oct--way before anyone was interviewed or was picked for nominations by the congressman. It's all so convoluted!
     
  10. USMA 1994

    USMA 1994 Member

    Joined:
    Mar 23, 2016
    Messages:
    909
    Likes Received:
    899
    There are a ton of threads covering this but the answer is basically the same as the LOA holder. Everyone has to compete on the MOC nomination slate. The highest WCS wins.

    The "signing" is not the same at a service academy. The letter they sign is not a commitment like a normal college. They have to compete like everyone else for a nomination.

    Now if the recruited athlete is highly valued by the team, the coach can give a "Blue Chip" that ill give a different type of appointment. That would not affect your DD.
     
  11. Gaittrainer

    Gaittrainer Member

    Joined:
    Jan 7, 2018
    Messages:
    27
    Likes Received:
    39
    To add to the comlpexity. Each senator and the congressman can have up to 5 cadets on their slate at the Academy at a given time. So this year my son graduates with 2 others from our congressional district. That opens 3 slots for our congressman for the class of 2022. He can nominate up to 10 candidates for each slot. He can choose a primary or he can let the academy pick the one in 10. So he can nominate up to 30 candidates this year. 3 can be charged to his slate. Some will go to the national pool. Some like the blue chip althete might go on a different slate. Clear as mud , right. You just have to sit back and enjoy the long wait. Don't over think it.
     
  12. Gaittrainer

    Gaittrainer Member

    Joined:
    Jan 7, 2018
    Messages:
    27
    Likes Received:
    39
    The academy has some superintendent slots where candidate can be charged, but they need a nomination from the senator or congressman first. So the LOA and the athlete need the nomination. Where it gets charged you will not know. So in other words your DS or DD still has a chance.
     
    GoArmy2022 likes this.
  13. GoArmy2022

    GoArmy2022 USMA 2022

    Joined:
    Oct 29, 2017
    Messages:
    398
    Likes Received:
    317
    If you have an LOA plus meet all of the requirements listed in your LOA by the specificed dates, INCLUDING receipt of a nomination, but someone else wins the slate, they’ll usually find another nom source. Admissions told me that supe mom slots are pretty much never all used.