Need suggestions for ARMY ROTC

ROTCMD25

Member
I am a rising senior male. I am going for the Army ROTC scholarship. I am an Eagle Scout. Just Attended Boys State. I have probably 100 volunteer hours. GPA is 3.4. Probably get it to 3.5 by end of year. Scored 1090 on SAT, but think I will get that higher. I ran track in high school, played soccer. My main sport is lacrosse and will play again next year. Will have 2 letters in that. I am in several clubs. Was student rep for incoming FR. Did a Rotary club leadership program. Interned at local science center. Worked 10 hours a week doing 2 jobs. I would like to do business/econ as a major and looking for any of the SMCs, South Carolina, NC State. VMI is my #1 choice. Do you think I have a chance at a scholarship? I think the SAT is going up at least 50 points. What else can I do to increase my chances? Parents can't afford VMI without a scholarship. I have attended several camps and overnights at VMI so I know what I would get into there and it's still my #1.
 
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vmi9d3

Member
I would say you are on the right track for acceptance to VMI, my son was accepted there this year and was selected for their Institute Honors Program. His grades and test scores were higher but the extra curricular was about the same. He was also awarded a 4-year NROTC scholarship. They can't say no, if you don't ask, and if they do, once you are there and show you are truly committed to the Army they usually help you find a way to obtain a scholarship. Good luck!
 

AROTC-dad

Moderator
5-Year Member
Other than raising your SAT higher, you are competitive for both acceptance and for a 4 year or 3 year Army scholarship. However, you should have a plan B and C for other schools.

My DS was accepted to The Citadel, but did not receive an NROTC scholarship there. At $50K a year it was pricey, so he chose to be a "walk-on" at another more affordable AROTC college out west close to home. He earned a campus based AROTC 3.5 year AD scholarship by working hard his MS-I (freshman) year. His goal was to commission and not go into debt, and he accomplished this by choosing to attend his "plan C" school.

You should be prepared to pay for at least the first year as the Army is awarding more 3 year scholarships now. Talk to the VMI financial aid people on how you can work this out.
 

AJC

Member
in my opinion your SAT should be closer to 1300.
They say 1100 is competitive but that really means to be considered at all.
 
It's hard to say because it really depends on the applicant pool and how many scholarships they are giving out. My son received a 3 year a couple of years ago. His GPA and SAT were higher but his extra curricular was a little less. He will be a 2nd at VMI this fall. I cannot say enough good things about VMI. I would talk to the financial aid office about what may be available if you don't get the scholarship, I know they provided some assistance my son's first year that made the out of state tuition a little more manageable, but that was also based on our FASFA, which you won't complete until next year.

Also, remember that to keep the scholarship you need to maintain a certain gpa and pass the APFT, as well as crazy things can happen like injuries that make you no longer medically qualified so have a back up plan for those years even if you get the scholarship.
 

Jcleppe

5-Year Member
A minimum 1100 SAT or a 24 ACT is important because it is the minimum that will get you the max points on the academic section of the interview sheet. A higher score will add points in other areas but it's important to get that minimum score so you get the interview points.
 

ROTCMD25

Member
A minimum 1100 SAT or a 24 ACT is important because it is the minimum that will get you the max points on the academic section of the interview sheet. A higher score will add points in other areas but it's important to get that minimum score so you get the interview points.
Good to know about that. I think the SAT will go up. Took it in Jun but have not gotten the score back yet and taking the ACT in Aug.
 

ROTCMD25

Member
It's hard to say because it really depends on the applicant pool and how many scholarships they are giving out. My son received a 3 year a couple of years ago. His GPA and SAT were higher but his extra curricular was a little less. He will be a 2nd at VMI this fall. I cannot say enough good things about VMI. I would talk to the financial aid office about what may be available if you don't get the scholarship, I know they provided some assistance my son's first year that made the out of state tuition a little more manageable, but that was also based on our FASFA, which you won't complete until next year.

Also, remember that to keep the scholarship you need to maintain a certain gpa and pass the APFT, as well as crazy things can happen like injuries that make you no longer medically qualified so have a back up plan for those years even if you get the scholarship.
Did not know you could lose the scholarship if you get injured and can't take the APFT. That's scary.
 
Not necessarily if you get injured and cannot take it but if you get an injury or illness that makes you no longer medically qualified. There was a cadet for example who lost an eye, he became DQ'd. Accidents happen. Is it likely, no, but if you can't afford the school without the scholarship you will be taking out lots of loans if you want to stay should something happen.
 

Jcleppe

5-Year Member
Did not know you could lose the scholarship if you get injured and can't take the APFT. That's scary.
One thing regarding injuries, if you pass your APFT when you start school and your scholarship is activated, then your set for that semester. If you have an injury that prevents you from taking the next APFT the battalion will put you on profile which means you keep your scholarship and continue receiving your stipend, you will have to pass the APFT once you're off profile.

If you have not passed an APFT to activate your scholarship and you get an injury that prevents you from taking the APFT, you will have until the end of the semester to pass, If you are still on profile at the end of the first semester then you will be on the hook to pay the first semester tuition yourself. The cadre will then determine if you try again your second semester, if they allow this and you pass the APFT then your scholarship will kick in starting that semester, you will not be reimbursed for the first semester.

Your Stipend does not start until you pass the APFT and are contracted, you do not get paid the stipend retroactive for the time before you passed and contracted.
 

kinnem

Moderator
5-Year Member
I'll keep it short and keep in mind it's just my opinion based on what you wrote.
You need to really improve that SAT score to be competitive for a scholarship.
I don't see any leadership. I did see that you attended a leadership workshop, but that's different from being a leader. Be the president in some of your EC activities, or captain of one of your teams.
Good luck.
 
My son received a 3 year AD scholarship this past year and my husband just started as an Army ROTC PMS a few months back. One thing I suspected when my son received his scholarship (and my husband has since confirmed,) is that your personal interview and your desire to commision counts a lot more than people realize. Your interview is a perfect chance to sell yourself and make up in areas you may lack in. While my son had sports and leadership, his GPA was only 3.1 and SAT 1200. However he had a great interview and really hit it off with the PMS conducting the interview. One of the questions the PMS answers in your interview results he then sends the board, is what he/she feels your desire to commision is and your general appearance and ease during the interview. Practice ahead of time and go into your interview thinking "you've got this."
 

ProudDad17

Member
@kinnem. I see the OP is an Eagle Scout; in order to achieve that rank, he will have held several leadership positions in his troop and will have completed a service project where he has to demonstrate leadership. It would be up to the OP to describe this leadership in his application and interview.

@ROTCMD25, I agree about improving the SAT score. Another thing to consider is taking the ACT instead. My DS took both and, while he did well on the SAT, he nailed the ACT. The questions are structured differently and some students find they prefer one over the other. You can take some practice tests for free online to see if you think you would do better on this test.
 

ROTCMD25

Member
I'll keep it short and keep in mind it's just my opinion based on what you wrote.
You need to really improve that SAT score to be competitive for a scholarship.
I don't see any leadership. I did see that you attended a leadership workshop, but that's different from being a leader. Be the president in some of your EC activities, or captain of one of your teams.
Good luck.
Lots of leadership. As a JR Class Rep for incoming FR, Eagle scout holding leadership positions in the unit. Just getting Eagle means you are a leader because of the project and the roles you have to take on as a Boy Scout like Patrol leader etc, Also held a position at Boys State, etc. I have the leadership positions. The SAT score is just going to be what it is. I can't really do much more than 1100-1200. I have taken it 4 times. I think this last time I went up so awaiting that score. Taking the ACT later in the summer. Lots of sports teams, etc. Community work in the area. Work PT as well.
 

Jcleppe

5-Year Member
I have taken it 4 times. I think this last time I went up so awaiting that score. Taking the ACT later in the summer.
Remember that Army ROTC Superscores your SAT/ACT, so they will take the best score from each section and add them together to get your final score.
 

AJC

Member
That's just not going to happen, 1100-1200 is what I will end up with on the test.
My son took the SAT 4 times. The first, very early. and got 1160.
Then with test prep and got 1210.
The next two times he focused on math once and english the other.
He ended up with a super score of 1360
Understanding the test strategy will add points. A good tutor can make a huge difference.
Investing less than $1000 helped him win a scholarship worth 100 times more.
 

glen

5-Year Member
My son took the SAT 4 times. The first, very early. and got 1160.
Then with test prep and got 1210.
The next two times he focused on math once and english the other.
He ended up with a super score of 1360
Understanding the test strategy will add points. A good tutor can make a huge difference.
Investing less than $1000 helped him win a scholarship worth 100 times more.

AJC - just to make sure I understand your point above - assume a student receives a 500 verbal and 650 math on his first SAT. His strategy for the second SAT for ROTC which super scores is to concentrate on the verbal portion of the second test to get it to the 650 range?
 

AJC

Member
exactly.
In my sons case on his 2nd SAT he spent all his time on verbal section. He scored lower on the math section than the 1st time but he was not concentrating on that as he already had a decent score on that section.
The next time he concentrated on the math and improved that score.
Before each exam he took several practice tests.
His prep tutor was able to explain how the test would be constructed. he would show him sample questions and tell him; there will be two of these, three of those, etc.
Really took the mystery out of it.
It not only helped his ROTC application (I think) , as he got a 3yr AD, it helped get him a very sizable merit scholarship to use his freshman year.
 
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