PTSD Limiting me

amsoccerman05

Member
Joined
Jul 5, 2019
Messages
11
I was recently diagnosed with PTSD from a school shooting. I am on Xanax and Trazadone due to it. Would these factors harm me in the admission process?
 

Capt MJ

Ancient Mariner
10-Year Member
Joined
Sep 27, 2008
Messages
8,136
I am very sorry you are dealing with that, but I am glad you got help. Health is #1.

This is what I think is the most recent standard for officer accessions:

https://www.esd.whs.mil/Portals/54/Documents/DD/issuances/dodi/613003p.pdf?ver=2018-04-09-114201-123


Section 5.28, Page 45 applies.

DODMERB Qs or DQs according to this standard. Then it is up to the Service to decide if it is waiverable per its individual policy, which can vary across the Services, because the missions, gear and operating environment vary.

You have a diagnosed condition and have been prescribed and are actively taking medication to address it.

My completely unofficial opinion is that this is probably unwaiverable. You would do better to ask Admissions, your primary source, right up front, before you commit to the application process. I hope they will tell you, for a situation like this. I’ll also defer to the regular USAFA posters for any insights they have.
 
Last edited:

flieger83

Super Moderator
10-Year Member
Joined
Jul 26, 2008
Messages
4,009
I'll piggyback on CaptMJ...she has the correct document and the section that she references is spot on (no surprise). I'd say that parts "q" and "v" may apply in your case.

My "experiences" as an ALO with DODMERB and section 5 of this OI are not the most promising, initially. They "tend" (again, only in my experiences with my candidates, a very small sample) to DQ first and then ask questions. Now in fairness, I've had many candidates receive a DQ from Chapter 5, to later be granted a waiver. However the key there was they were NOT on medications and had ceased them, with medical approval, prior to their DODMERB examination.

As CaptMJ said, your health is the FIRST and MOST IMPORTANT priority!!! All the rest of it, the academy, service, etc., is secondary. I commissioned a young man, a former student of mine, into the army two years ago. He couldn't get into an SA as he had been diagnosed as a young child with ADHD. During high school (senior year) he (with medical approval) stopped his meds. He went to a local state university, did great, and received a DODMERB waiver for ROTC based upon his performance in college. He completed ROTC and I was honored to be his commissioning officer. He's just returned from an overseas deployment and is doing great!

My point behind that story is that you can't say "oh, they gave me a DQ, I'm done forever." If they do say "DQ right now..." it very possibly isn't forever. If service is your goal, then press ahead and let them say "yea or nay" and then go from there. Contact admissions on Monday, speak with one of the counselors. They are the most open, honest, and helpful folks in the admissions directorate...and they have a lot of pull. They'll tell you precisely what you need to know and how to approach this!!

Steve
USAFA ALO
USAFA '83
 

amsoccerman05

Member
Joined
Jul 5, 2019
Messages
11
I am very sorry you are dealing with that, but I am glad you got help. Health is #1.

This is what I think is the most recent standard for officer accessions:

https://www.esd.whs.mil/Portals/54/Documents/DD/issuances/dodi/613003p.pdf?ver=2018-04-09-114201-123


Section 5.28, Page 45 applies.

DODMERB Qs or DQs according to this standard. Then it is up to the Service to decide if it is waiverable per its individual policy, which can vary across the Services, because the missions, gear and operating environment vary.

You have a diagnosed condition and have been prescribed and are actively taking medication to address it.

My completely unofficial opinion is that this is probably unwaiverable. You would do better to ask Admissions, your primary source, right up front, before you commit to the application process. I hope they will tell you, for a situation like this. I’ll also defer to the regular USAFA posters for any insights they have.
I'll piggyback on CaptMJ...she has the correct document and the section that she references is spot on (no surprise). I'd say that parts "q" and "v" may apply in your case.

My "experiences" as an ALO with DODMERB and section 5 of this OI are not the most promising, initially. They "tend" (again, only in my experiences with my candidates, a very small sample) to DQ first and then ask questions. Now in fairness, I've had many candidates receive a DQ from Chapter 5, to later be granted a waiver. However the key there was they were NOT on medications and had ceased them, with medical approval, prior to their DODMERB examination.

As CaptMJ said, your health is the FIRST and MOST IMPORTANT priority!!! All the rest of it, the academy, service, etc., is secondary. I commissioned a young man, a former student of mine, into the army two years ago. He couldn't get into an SA as he had been diagnosed as a young child with ADHD. During high school (senior year) he (with medical approval) stopped his meds. He went to a local state university, did great, and received a DODMERB waiver for ROTC based upon his performance in college. He completed ROTC and I was honored to be his commissioning officer. He's just returned from an overseas deployment and is doing great!

My point behind that story is that you can't say "oh, they gave me a DQ, I'm done forever." If they do say "DQ right now..." it very possibly isn't forever. If service is your goal, then press ahead and let them say "yea or nay" and then go from there. Contact admissions on Monday, speak with one of the counselors. They are the most open, honest, and helpful folks in the admissions directorate...and they have a lot of pull. They'll tell you precisely what you need to know and how to approach this!!

Steve
USAFA ALO
USAFA '83
Thank you! I'll make sure to ask. Would I have to quit my medication before I come to the academy?
 

flieger83

Super Moderator
10-Year Member
Joined
Jul 26, 2008
Messages
4,009
I am very sorry you are dealing with that, but I am glad you got help. Health is #1.

This is what I think is the most recent standard for officer accessions:

https://www.esd.whs.mil/Portals/54/Documents/DD/issuances/dodi/613003p.pdf?ver=2018-04-09-114201-123


Section 5.28, Page 45 applies.

DODMERB Qs or DQs according to this standard. Then it is up to the Service to decide if it is waiverable per its individual policy, which can vary across the Services, because the missions, gear and operating environment vary.

You have a diagnosed condition and have been prescribed and are actively taking medication to address it.

My completely unofficial opinion is that this is probably unwaiverable. You would do better to ask Admissions, your primary source, right up front, before you commit to the application process. I hope they will tell you, for a situation like this. I’ll also defer to the regular USAFA posters for any insights they have.
I'll piggyback on CaptMJ...she has the correct document and the section that she references is spot on (no surprise). I'd say that parts "q" and "v" may apply in your case.

My "experiences" as an ALO with DODMERB and section 5 of this OI are not the most promising, initially. They "tend" (again, only in my experiences with my candidates, a very small sample) to DQ first and then ask questions. Now in fairness, I've had many candidates receive a DQ from Chapter 5, to later be granted a waiver. However the key there was they were NOT on medications and had ceased them, with medical approval, prior to their DODMERB examination.

As CaptMJ said, your health is the FIRST and MOST IMPORTANT priority!!! All the rest of it, the academy, service, etc., is secondary. I commissioned a young man, a former student of mine, into the army two years ago. He couldn't get into an SA as he had been diagnosed as a young child with ADHD. During high school (senior year) he (with medical approval) stopped his meds. He went to a local state university, did great, and received a DODMERB waiver for ROTC based upon his performance in college. He completed ROTC and I was honored to be his commissioning officer. He's just returned from an overseas deployment and is doing great!

My point behind that story is that you can't say "oh, they gave me a DQ, I'm done forever." If they do say "DQ right now..." it very possibly isn't forever. If service is your goal, then press ahead and let them say "yea or nay" and then go from there. Contact admissions on Monday, speak with one of the counselors. They are the most open, honest, and helpful folks in the admissions directorate...and they have a lot of pull. They'll tell you precisely what you need to know and how to approach this!!

Steve
USAFA ALO
USAFA '83
Thank you! I'll make sure to ask. Would I have to quit my medication before I come to the academy?
That's a question for the counselors initially and then DODMERB eventually.

My "non-medical, non-binding, personal opinion" is that you would.

Steve
USAFA ALO
USAFA '83
 

THParent

Founder - Service Academy Bacon Forums (SABF)
Joined
Oct 15, 2017
Messages
3,458
My "non-medical, non-binding, personal opinion" is that you would need to be off all treatment for anxiety for a minimum of 24 months, before being considered for military service.
 

amsoccerman05

Member
Joined
Jul 5, 2019
Messages
11
My "non-medical, non-binding, personal opinion" is that you would need to be off all treatment for anxiety for a minimum of 24 months, before being considered for military service.
Would this mean I quit the medication in high school?
 

Korab

Member
Joined
Nov 8, 2017
Messages
549
My "non-medical, non-binding, personal opinion" is that you would need to be off all treatment for anxiety for a minimum of 24 months, before being considered for military service.
Would this mean I quit the medication in high school?
not just quit, but be directed to stop taking it by your doctor based on a medical determination you no longer need it.
 
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