Reapplicant

I am currently thinking about my application for next year. I have committed to a relatively prestigious Plan B and plan to join NROTC during my first year. However, as I think about how my application will look next year, I am concerned that I made the wrong choice and should stay in-state at a school where it would be easier to make better grades and maintain a higher GPA. However when I think in terms of where I could possibly be for the next four years, it is an obvious choice (the harder school) for all aspects. I, in no way, intend to simply take the easy way out, as I know that won't be an option should I receive an appointment to the USNA. I am just worried that this "better" school where I'd much rather be might make it a little more difficult to get into the USNA. I am just looking for some advice for successful reapplicants or anyone who can shed some light on the subject. I've read most reapplicant threads, but I just want to ensure that I am making my application as successful as I can while sufficiently challenging myself next year so that I am prepared should I get in. Thank you in advance!
 
I forgot to mention that the in state school does not have an NROTC unit or any close by to participate in so the USNA would be the only path to service, if I went there, until college was over.
 

NavyHoops

Super Moderator
5-Year Member
I think you have answered your question. The school you would thrive at the most is the right place. 'Prestigious' doesn't mean harder either. State school might have a Chem 101 class with 300 kids. Not sure if your other school is smaller or not, but it could have a smaller class size. That could lead to more involvement and personal relationships. Often times that is more a contributing factor than school name. NROTC gives you another path to a Nom and commission. Go to the place where you will succeed and be happiest.
 
I think you have answered your question. The school you would thrive at the most is the right place. 'Prestigious' doesn't mean harder either. State school might have a Chem 101 class with 300 kids. Not sure if your other school is smaller or not, but it could have a smaller class size. That could lead to more involvement and personal relationships. Often times that is more a contributing factor than school name. NROTC gives you another path to a Nom and commission. Go to the place where you will succeed and be happiest.
Class size seems to be around the same (~30) at both schools. It's just that most kids from my high school go to this state school and say it's "easier" than it might have been given the work we have here. I know many with 4.0's who said they put in little to no effort but those I know at the non-state school say that their classes are harder. I feel as though I would be happiest at the non-state school but I guess there's no sure way to predict how well I would do there in comparison other than through the experience of others, which seems to be that their GPA's are lower and harder to maintain. I will most likely end up at the OOS school and will make sure I work my butt off to get good teacher recs and high grades while also participating in NROTC
 

usna1985

10-Year Member
First, you're doing the right thing in selecting the school that will help you most in the long term-- and you may well decide you love it so much that you no longer want to apply to USNA. And, assuming that desire still burns, you've challenged yourself the way that USNA will challenge you. Not taking the "easy way out" will benefit you in many ways.

Hopefully, you'll thrive and that will be even more beneficial if/when you decide to reapply to USNA. Even though USNA says that "any" 4-year college will do, I like to think that the MITs of the world count a bit more than schools that may not be as challenging (recognizing that many have to select other schools for financial and other reasons, which is ok as well).

Years ago I received some great advice: Don't look back. You've made your choice and it sounds like an excellent one. Embrace it! There's no reason you can't excel at this school -- which you obviously love.

Best of luck in whatever path you choose.
 
First, you're doing the right thing in selecting the school that will help you most in the long term-- and you may well decide you love it so much that you no longer want to apply to USNA. And, assuming that desire still burns, you've challenged yourself the way that USNA will challenge you. Not taking the "easy way out" will benefit you in many ways.

Hopefully, you'll thrive and that will be even more beneficial if/when you decide to reapply to USNA. Even though USNA says that "any" 4-year college will do, I like to think that the MITs of the world count a bit more than schools that may not be as challenging (recognizing that many have to select other schools for financial and other reasons, which is ok as well).

Years ago I received some great advice: Don't look back. You've made your choice and it sounds like an excellent one. Embrace it! There's no reason you can't excel at this school -- which you obviously love.

Best of luck in whatever path you choose.
Thank you for the kind words and reassurance! I definitely hope and am confident in the fact that this school, while possibly harder, will prepare me for the rigorous course load and time management needed at the USNA and show them that I am, in fact, trying to avoid taking the easy way out. Again, appreciate the advice!
 
Just a question: Are first year college ROTC students who wish to apply to Service Academies or transfer to another ROTC units supported by their unit/Commanders?
 
Just a question: Are first year college ROTC students who wish to apply to Service Academies or other ROTC college units supported by their unit/Commanders?
I can't speak from experience, but in reading many threads on here, I've heard of nothing but good experience and support with this at least in terms of USNA
 

VTMIDN

Member
Just a question: Are first year college ROTC students who wish to apply to Service Academies or transfer to another ROTC units supported by their unit/Commanders?
You apply for NROTC nominations for the an Academy nomination. Each unit can nominate three people at most from their given unit. The CO usually makes this decision, and usually that is their recommendation for the academy. You can still ask your CO for a recommendation letter even if you weren't selected for the nomination, most CO's would be glad to help out.
 

Old Navy BGO

5-Year Member
Just a question: Are first year college ROTC students who wish to apply to Service Academies or transfer to another ROTC units supported by their unit/Commanders?
Advice that I gave one of my candidates last year , but hopefully doesn't need to be said -- don't go into ROTC with the attitude that you are merely marking time, or that you feel ROTC is beneath you, because you will be going to USNA next year. Start off strong, get yourself recognized as a leader in your class, and earn the trust and respect of those above you. If you do that, they will support you 100% when it comes down to ask for recommendations. In addition, if you are unsuccessful, you will have set the groundwork for future leadership positions in your unit.
 
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