Well, we were just thrown a curve ball...medical evaluation, waivers, oh my.

ElsieKay

LisaK is in Italy
Joined
May 9, 2017
Messages
50
My son has just started the application process. We started with the physical -- where a previously un-diagnosed heart condition was discovered! It's one of the most common (and easily corrected) conditions -- BUT, he won't qualify medically until he's 2 years post-op (assuming no symptoms return -- he's a highly competitive athlete, the symptoms he was experiencing were attributed to training, since that is the only place they occurred, and they went away post-training).

And, here I was worried about getting his "asthma" waived (I put that in quotes, because he has never had an asthmatic episode, he is not being treated for it, and hasn't been for 4 years -- according to his doctor, his symptoms are more in line with Vocal Cord Dysfunction, not asthma. We were scheduling further testing to rule asthma out). Now this.

I don't know how the waivers really work -- and we're trying to explore the various options that may still be open to him (this is all pending further testing and evaluation by a cardiologist).

**GAP Year** to preserve NCAA eligibility in his sport, using MIT Scholars Open Courseware programs to continue his academic pursuits, plus leadership/internship/TA opportunities we have access to. This would get him past the 2 year post-op hurdle required for medical clearance.

**Apply anyway and hope for the best** I'm not sure if specific instructions with regard to health issues are ever waived, even if the candidate is being recruited and has been released to return to all normal activity. Anyone??

Anyone with any other insights?

Thank you
 

kpmom2013

10-Year Member
Joined
Apr 14, 2009
Messages
1,366
My son has just started the application process. We started with the physical -- where a previously un-diagnosed heart condition was discovered! It's one of the most common (and easily corrected) conditions -- BUT, he won't qualify medically until he's 2 years post-op (assuming no symptoms return -- he's a highly competitive athlete, the symptoms he was experiencing were attributed to training, since that is the only place they occurred, and they went away post-training).

And, here I was worried about getting his "asthma" waived (I put that in quotes, because he has never had an asthmatic episode, he is not being treated for it, and hasn't been for 4 years -- according to his doctor, his symptoms are more in line with Vocal Cord Dysfunction, not asthma. We were scheduling further testing to rule asthma out). Now this.

I don't know how the waivers really work -- and we're trying to explore the various options that may still be open to him (this is all pending further testing and evaluation by a cardiologist).

**GAP Year** to preserve NCAA eligibility in his sport, using MIT Scholars Open Courseware programs to continue his academic pursuits, plus leadership/internship/TA opportunities we have access to. This would get him past the 2 year post-op hurdle required for medical clearance.

**Apply anyway and hope for the best** I'm not sure if specific instructions with regard to health issues are ever waived, even if the candidate is being recruited and has been released to return to all normal activity. Anyone??

Anyone with any other insights?

Thank you
I would apply anyway because it is extremely difficult trying to guess what admissions will do and when they will grant a waiver. We discovered previously unknown heart condition and torn cornea in our DS and some people advised him not to bother applying. He went ahead and applied and is a 2013 Kings Point graduate who is now serving as a Navy pilot which he was also told would be impossible. If this is your DS's dream, don't give up. Good luck.
 

azmilmom

Member
Joined
Nov 11, 2016
Messages
499
Also, if you search under the Service Academy Forum's DoDMERB threads, there are references to some consultants who will give you advice on your son's condition and the best way to move forward. I believe there is also a retired head of DoDMERB who contributes to the thread. Best of luck to your son!
 

AROTC-dad

Moderator
5-Year Member
Joined
Mar 14, 2014
Messages
5,809
Also, if you search under the Service Academy Forum's DoDMERB threads, there are references to some consultants who will give you advice on your son's condition and the best way to move forward. I believe there is also a retired head of DoDMERB who contributes to the thread. Best of luck to your son!

Here is a past thread about Dr. Glen Merchant who was formerly the Director of DoDMERB and a retired Navy Physician/Marine Fighter pilot

https://www.serviceacademyforums.com/index.php?threads/dodmerb-consultants.49042/
 

golfindad

Member
Joined
Apr 13, 2016
Messages
374
you have already thought this, but, no matter what happens, the SA process has helped you all a lot. Without it you may have never learned of this until possibly something negative occurred. So, this is a positive, and is not a set back. That being said, I think you are smart to be proactive. Too many people are reactive, and by the time they decide to do something, it is too little too late. It is smart to go into this knowing what results must be obtained in order to be granted a waiver. That way you can work the care and rehab in that direction.
 
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