Appointment acccepted then turned down

Discussion in 'Naval Academy - USNA' started by Em_FLA, Jun 14, 2019.

  1. jl123

    jl123 Member

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    Unlikely MOC can do anything about a medical issue, but in the case of SA appointments MOC's are part of the process and should be included in issues regarding appointment status.

    In addition to contacting USNA admissions directly, call the Admissions Director of other colleges he was accepted at (in order of preference) and explain the situation - may get a pleasant surprise.
     
  2. justdoit19

    justdoit19 Member

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    I’ve said before, DS had an empty spot in his room last year on IDay. The roommate was turned away there on the yard on IDay. From something that was reported, and didn’t heal to their standards for
    Plebe summer. It does happen.

    So sorry to hear. I hope your son is OK. Perhaps there is still hope. Don’t give up! There are reasons for the process.
     
    Last edited: Jun 14, 2019
  3. WaveThatFlag

    WaveThatFlag Member

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    This "worst case scenario" is exactly why we "bit the bullet" and put a (non refundable) deposit down on DS's plan B school. Just in case....
     
  4. GoCubbies

    GoCubbies Member

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    Ugh. The DODI and MANMED says (I’m paraphrasing here) any history of gastrointestinal functional or motility disorders within the past 24 months is DQ.

    Was the SBO a bona fide diagnosis?
    I’m assuming the USNA is counting it as the true diagnosis if it was written all over his ER, hospital, and discharge notes.

    Maybe the USNA will shorten the time length of the DQ and allow your DS to apply for next year.

    At this point, I’d probably try to figure out why the SBO happened. Finding out the cause will help with the waiver process should your DS pursue this in the near future.

    Has he had abdominal surgery in the past? Maybe for an appendectomy or hernia surgery?
     
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  5. Em_FLA

    Em_FLA New Member

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    This!! This is the point of my post. Don’t just have a plan B. Have a complete back-up plan. Good thinking!
     
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  6. Old Navy BGO

    Old Navy BGO 5-Year Member

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    The MOC makes a NOMINATION. USNA , and perhaps other SA's , give the MOC an opportunity to notify the Appointee as a courtesy. MOC should not be, and most probably carefully avoid, further involvement in the Admissions process.

    Sure, you have the right to contact your MOC, but actions have consequences. I participated in responding to a MOC inquiry when I was on active duty, and the reaction from the entire Chain of Command was to justify our actions, rather than try to address some perceived injustice.
    (In my case it was easy , a young enlisted sailor sent her Congressman a letter claiming she was in the Philadelphia brig "against her will." As Squadron Legal Officer, I had to draft the lengthy response detailing each step of the process leading to her brig time. (That was after the Skipper shot down my initial response " Dear Congressman XX X, most people are in the brig against their will; there are very few volunteers."). There may be times when it appropriate to contact your MOC, but only as a last resort.

    The bottom line, there is a lot of speculation and uncertainty on this thread, including trying to diagnose a medical condition with very limited information (sticky rice ?) and relying on a portal change notice, INSTEAD OF PICKING UP A PHONE AND TALKING TO THE SOURCE. There are some bright young men and women in the Admissions Office (I've met many of them), and if they don't have the answer , they all understand the 4th basic response (one of the first things learned on I-Day). "I will find out Sir/Ma'am." USE THE CHAIN OF COMMAND !

    This is an unfortunate situation, but certainly not the first time a last minute medical issue has happened. Starting with an LOA, and subsequent offer of appointment from Florida (which is pretty competitive), it is obvious OP DS is a first class kid and USNA wants him to attend. They aren't looking for ways to keep anyone out, but they aren't going to admit someone until cleared medically. All parents have to understand...this isn't just sending your son/daughter to college. The Navy is investing a lot of time , money and effort into turning your kid into a Naval Officer. One of the first lessons to understand about the Navy is that the needs/wants/desires of the individual will always be subordinate to the needs of the Navy.

    For OP - there is some good advice in this thread. First, don't down play or think this isn't a serious medical issue. It is serious as long as the Navy thinks it is. Get all the information about your Son's condition you can. Research the Navy Medical Regs to find out whether the condition is in fact a permanent DQ, or waiverable. Enlist your Doctor's help in presenting this to USNA as favorably as possible. Next, it may be too late for this year .. things like this don't get resolved overnight, but talk with Admissions about an LOA for next year. (And if you get the LOA, that would be certainly a good time to write Sen. Rubio and tell him what happened, because I would be willing to bet he'd put DS on the top of the list for next).

    Finally, look forward , not back - I really like the Victor/Victim comments someone described in an earlier thread about Plebe Summer , and will probably refer to them a lot on this Forum in the future -that's a good way to look at life in general. Pick up the phone, call Plan B and see if DS can get in (this might be a good time to avoid mentioning it may only be for a year); I would expect most colleges would love to DS , and can find a space for him. If not, make this a productive year - take classes at the local Community College, work, etc. Those credits usually transfer. Finally, if DS ultimate goal is to serve as a Naval/Marine Corps officer, there are several ways to get there, and when they pin on the bars, all O-1s are the same.

    Yeah, its a gut shot. I really feel for DS and your family, but its not the end of the world no matter how it works out.

    Good luck.
     
  7. jl123

    jl123 Member

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    Yes, use the Chain of Command first and foremost. In most cases the Chain of Command is responsive, responsible, and dedicated. But the Chain of Command is not perfect. Sometimes they are overwhelmed and sometimes you run into a few idiots who are not responsive, responsible, and dedicated. I too have dealt with MOC offices. If handled professionally and businesslike, they are reasonable and even helpful.

    I do not suggest contacting a MOC over a trivial issue. But if an issue is critical and the Chain of Command is unresponsive after giving them ample chance to respond, contacting a MOC is appropriate and effective. An officer who would retaliate against a subordinate with a legitimate issue is unworthy of command.

    Unlikely a MOC would agree that they are servants of the academy, merely limited to submitting nominations. Just as unlikely that an academy admissions officer would tell them that. The relationship between MOC and admissions is not and should not be adversarial.
     
  8. jl123

    jl123 Member

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    Have a Plan B as back-up, but make sure you know how to avoid getting caught by Plan B school if they don't know they are the back-up.
     
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  9. ekb1398

    ekb1398 Member

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    Also worth mentioning (as already has been from an ROTC standpoint) that just because he may be disqualified from the Naval Academy does not necessarily mean that he would be from any or all other Service Academies if another branch interests him.
     
  10. Impulsive

    Impulsive Member

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    I think we ALL feel for your DS and the whole family. VERY difficult to deal with, especially with dropping Plan B because of time constraints. We are in the same boat so to speak, X2. Both had to make the same decision your DS did, by May 31st. Many scholarships require a "commitment" May 31st, and a financial penalty if you do not attend. Everyone worries an injury or medical issue will occur like your DS's and throw a wrench into the best laid plans. You roll the dice and hope things work out, and if they don't then be prepared for what you are experiencing. Medical issues can occur the day before I-Day and leave a young adult scrambling to get on with their schooling or lives. Piece of mind is a good thing, even if it costs a little money. You seem to be in Florida, some of the State Universities admissions are still open and will include Bright Futures, Grants, and other financial aid. Also, ALL the State Colleges will accept students (with Bright Futures and financial aid) almost up till start of classes. If it isn't DS's first choice, he can always transfer, usually with the Bright Futures and Grants intact to the school he wants to attend, and possibly get into ROTC (waivers are different for every branch and program). Medical is out of your control, Academies and Colleges understand that. Unless you keep your DD/DS in a bubble from appointment till I-Day there is always that possibility of medical issues arising. Also, remember that sometimes medical issues occur in the Academy or ROTC and may again be medically disqualifying. There are NO guarantees in life, especially the military, which is inherently a dangerous place to live and work.

    Best of Luck to your DS, and hopefully you will get this straightened out quickly and everything will turn out OK, but you cannot control issues outside your realm, medical being one such issue. Like others have said, if he cannot get past medical get moving on available Universities or Colleges that still are open for enrollment (University of North Florida is still open till July 1st I believe), then transfer next year. With his credentials, even if he does not go into the military, he will do well in a good University and go far in life.
     
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  11. sabrescoutmom

    sabrescoutmom Member

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    I did the same for Plan B school and and to us it is $ well spent . A non-refundable deposit is just that. the only issue would be if it was " Early decision " which is binding.
     
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  12. Dr. Strange Love

    Dr. Strange Love Member

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    It’s an SBO .... Is it chronic? What do the ER notes say? I didn’t read in the OP that the ER applied an invasive routine .... Perhaps just IV fluids for hydration and no food or liquid intake until the blockage clears.

    What is the problem that needs fixing?

    Is there a problem that needs fixing?

    What is the waiting period to reapply? He seems to be a great candidate to me.
    .
     
  13. jl123

    jl123 Member

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    Not so. Read the many, many threads on this topic. The bottom line is that colleges don't consider it just a non-refundable deposit.

    Several examples of colleges reacting harshly, threatening to report the violation, and even going after people for lost tuition.

    Easy not to get caught, but you should know the ways that can trip you up.
     
  14. Overwhelmed

    Overwhelmed Member

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    Could this be a factor in all of this?
     
  15. sabrescoutmom

    sabrescoutmom Member

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  16. Love4monsters

    Love4monsters Member

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    We have been completely upfront with son’s backup plan and the university has been amazing plus waived his deposit. Big SEC school and it has been impressive. Be honest with the university and they may surprise you. His plan C was one mentioned on SAF who came after someone for the amount. He turned down the NROTC and gave up his spot.

    Original poster - So sorry for your situation and hope your son is finding his spot. It would be devastating to all.
     
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  17. Devil Doc

    Devil Doc Teufel Doc

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    Empathy applies here on my part. My DS was a lock for USNA football...until he wasn't. Once Coach Johnson and staff got every commitment on the slate above him he was dropped like a hot pocket, or potato. He had no plan B. Sure, he visited other schools. It was all about football and Annapolis was the best chance for the best opportunity. He ended up going to a place he hated and left after the first semester. He attended five schools before finally getting his degree. This was all in the name of chasing the sports dream. The good thing is he attended class through the years, got his sheepskin, and earned a spot in the Marines' PLC program. I'm more PO'd to this day than he is even though it has been 14 years. I'm with you though parent. I know my rambling won't help your raw pain, but that rascally Boat School on the Severn can go...................................

    Rant over. The boy turned out just fine. He's once again away from the flag pole doing America's work and I keep that in perspective when I fret about how he might have gotten a bad deal. Happy Father's Day.
     
  18. Dr. Strange Love

    Dr. Strange Love Member

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    I have to continue my previous comment/question, because there is something that irritates me a whole lot about this situation.

    The young man must have been in some serious pain to go to the ER .... But as it turns out, the diagnosis is some kind of bowel issue. From the OP, and subsequent dialog, it does not sound like this is chronic, and the young man is just fine.

    Thank goodness the young man is Ok. This could have simply been a lack of hydration and poor food intake. We all know what it is. Under such circumstances, any stress to the body such as a foreign invader, over exercise, repairing a 1000 foot fencing in the heat all day ... you get it ... can cause problems. I have been dehydrated to point where normal movement has been a challenge. I knew what was wrong, and it corrected itself with a little time.

    This is one of those situations where holding back on reporting the events until a further assessment, may have been the right call. I am not walking in their shoes, however, so I can’t see everything ... So please forgive my judgement. I am just irritated by the young man’s situation. Seems like he is a great USNA candidate.
    .
     
  19. Em_FLA

    Em_FLA New Member

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    He is perfectly fine now. In fact, he was just at the gym earlier today, mowed the lawn, and out on a date with his girlfriend now (you get the picture). The harsh truth of the matter is that if I had not contacted the BGO when DS was in the hospital, none of this would be an issue.

    The doctor who cared for him at the hospital believed the issue may have been caused as a result of an appendectomy he had as a young child (scar tissue). They don’t recommend surgery for this type of thing because it usually leads to more scar tissue (adhesions). In the hospital he was given IV fluids and they kept him NPO. It all resolved on its own and he went home after 2 nights in the hospital. I thought I was doing the right thing to notify the BGO that we were in the hospital. No good deed goes unpunished, maybe?

    DS reached out to a FL university and they are very happy to have him. They reapplied his scholarships and reopened the portal for him to accept. He’s looking into officer commisioning school after he gets his BS. He has accepted the situation.

    Meanwhile, I’m feeling like I stole my son’s hope and dreams. I’m certainly not having the same thoughts about USNA as I did just one week ago.

    Of course, if they were to call and say it was all a big mistake (yeah right), I’d be sending him on the next plane. That isn’t the case and we’re left picking up the pieces.
     
  20. Love4monsters

    Love4monsters Member

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    Please have son call and speak with admissions tomorrow. If they have no medical records etc, it could change their mind.

    So glad to hear of the Florida university that is helping your son adjust to a new path.

    Please take care of yourself too. I would feel the same if I was in your shoes in regards to being the person who notified but I truly believe things happen for a reason. It isn’t always apparent why but there is a silver lining somewhere.
     
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