Appointment acccepted then turned down

There are always some kinds of loopholes in systems. But “honor” shall play a key role in SA applications since the appointees will be eventually leading soldiers and others as a leader. If he/she failed in “honor code” from the beginning, they already failed in their “future” leadership.

A major problem always starts from a tiny scratch or dent but it mostly ends up in “failure.” DoDMERB or USNA would not detect this type of issue immediately but a system will define “failure” eventually.

As I managed some big/major projects and personnel issues, those problems used to be disclosed by “system” eventually. Some folks here might understand the meaning of “system.”
 

Humey

Member
No, you can't easily go around an audit by failing to disclose, unless you are paying your doctor in cash or chickens. Insurance companies keep records for everyone. Insurance company records are all searchable by social security number, complete with diagnosis/treatment codes. These can easily be searched. As for Hippa, the academies could easily include a blanket Hippa authorization as part of the application packet - problem solved. If an insurance company paid for something, there is no way to hide it.
O.K. . so the USNA would send the "blanket HIPPA authorization" to who? They would have to send it every medical provider and health insurance company in the world. A less than candid candidate could just as easily fail to disclose a health insurance company as they could a medical provider. As said before, the system relies upon the integrity of the candidate to reveal their true medical history as well as a reasonable physical exam. Nothing is perfect.
Services already compile this information. Insurance companies use it all the time to search for prior treatment - if you aren't involved in the industry, I guess you'd be surprised at what is readily available. Based on the available information, you would know exactly who to request records from.

Well if i was going to bother going to see another doctor for that reason, I would also pay in cash. As I mentioned before I belong to Kaiser. However to see a dermatologist, it takes a referral and time plus it can cost additional money. I dont bother going to Kasier for that. I go see a dermatologist in my building and pay him cash. As I cant pay with insurance, I pay cash and because of that, I get a reduced fee. It isnt that the doctor is pocketing the cash but rather he doesnt have to deal with the cost of administrave fees, billing and credit card charges. I mean if you want to hide an ezcema outbreak, how much do you think it would cost to see a doctor and get prescribed a cream. Its funny you make sound like paying cash is some weird thing. As for social security, you can easily write down the wrong number. I am not trying to encourage anyone to go through these steps, but if you are motivated enough, anything can be done.
.

Paying cash for medical care is very uncommon, unless you are a Mennonite or Amish. Cash for care will be on the rise in the future, but it isn't common at present.
I disagree. I think plenty of people pay with cash especially when you dont have insurance. Laser Eye surgery is paid with cash and so is plastic surgergy and lets not forget dental services. I agree that most people do pay with insurance and that includes myself, but as I have mentioned previously I have paid with cash when I used services outside my HMO. We even went to a private doctor (outside of the HMO) to get a second opinion about a condition my younger son had. Another time, we werent happy with the dematolgist (for my younger son) we had at Kaiser and we were referred to a private dr who really knew his stuff. WE paid both directly. Now, I paid with a credit card, but I could have easily paid with a check or cash. My point being, that while paying with cash isnt probably the norm, it happens more than you think.
 

Korab

Member
No, you can't easily go around an audit by failing to disclose, unless you are paying your doctor in cash or chickens. Insurance companies keep records for everyone. Insurance company records are all searchable by social security number, complete with diagnosis/treatment codes. These can easily be searched. As for Hippa, the academies could easily include a blanket Hippa authorization as part of the application packet - problem solved. If an insurance company paid for something, there is no way to hide it.
O.K. . so the USNA would send the "blanket HIPPA authorization" to who? They would have to send it every medical provider and health insurance company in the world. A less than candid candidate could just as easily fail to disclose a health insurance company as they could a medical provider. As said before, the system relies upon the integrity of the candidate to reveal their true medical history as well as a reasonable physical exam. Nothing is perfect.
Services already compile this information. Insurance companies use it all the time to search for prior treatment - if you aren't involved in the industry, I guess you'd be surprised at what is readily available. Based on the available information, you would know exactly who to request records from.

Well if i was going to bother going to see another doctor for that reason, I would also pay in cash. As I mentioned before I belong to Kaiser. However to see a dermatologist, it takes a referral and time plus it can cost additional money. I dont bother going to Kasier for that. I go see a dermatologist in my building and pay him cash. As I cant pay with insurance, I pay cash and because of that, I get a reduced fee. It isnt that the doctor is pocketing the cash but rather he doesnt have to deal with the cost of administrave fees, billing and credit card charges. I mean if you want to hide an ezcema outbreak, how much do you think it would cost to see a doctor and get prescribed a cream. Its funny you make sound like paying cash is some weird thing. As for social security, you can easily write down the wrong number. I am not trying to encourage anyone to go through these steps, but if you are motivated enough, anything can be done.
.

Paying cash for medical care is very uncommon, unless you are a Mennonite or Amish. Cash for care will be on the rise in the future, but it isn't common at present.
I disagree. I think plenty of people pay with cash especially when you dont have insurance. Laser Eye surgery is paid with cash and so is plastic surgergy and lets not forget dental services. I agree that most people do pay with insurance and that includes myself, but as I have mentioned previously I have paid with cash when I used services outside my HMO. We even went to a private doctor (outside of the HMO) to get a second opinion about a condition my younger son had. Another time, we werent happy with the dematolgist (for my younger son) we had at Kaiser and we were referred to a private dr who really knew his stuff. WE paid both directly. Now, I paid with a credit card, but I could have easily paid with a check or cash. My point being, that while paying with cash isnt probably the norm, it happens more than you think.
According to the American Academy of Private Physicians, only 6000 of 900,000 physicians in the US privately contact with patients for medical care, so 0.67%
 

Humey

Member
No, you can't easily go around an audit by failing to disclose, unless you are paying your doctor in cash or chickens. Insurance companies keep records for everyone. Insurance company records are all searchable by social security number, complete with diagnosis/treatment codes. These can easily be searched. As for Hippa, the academies could easily include a blanket Hippa authorization as part of the application packet - problem solved. If an insurance company paid for something, there is no way to hide it.
O.K. . so the USNA would send the "blanket HIPPA authorization" to who? They would have to send it every medical provider and health insurance company in the world. A less than candid candidate could just as easily fail to disclose a health insurance company as they could a medical provider. As said before, the system relies upon the integrity of the candidate to reveal their true medical history as well as a reasonable physical exam. Nothing is perfect.
Services already compile this information. Insurance companies use it all the time to search for prior treatment - if you aren't involved in the industry, I guess you'd be surprised at what is readily available. Based on the available information, you would know exactly who to request records from.

Well if i was going to bother going to see another doctor for that reason, I would also pay in cash. As I mentioned before I belong to Kaiser. However to see a dermatologist, it takes a referral and time plus it can cost additional money. I dont bother going to Kasier for that. I go see a dermatologist in my building and pay him cash. As I cant pay with insurance, I pay cash and because of that, I get a reduced fee. It isnt that the doctor is pocketing the cash but rather he doesnt have to deal with the cost of administrave fees, billing and credit card charges. I mean if you want to hide an ezcema outbreak, how much do you think it would cost to see a doctor and get prescribed a cream. Its funny you make sound like paying cash is some weird thing. As for social security, you can easily write down the wrong number. I am not trying to encourage anyone to go through these steps, but if you are motivated enough, anything can be done.
.

Paying cash for medical care is very uncommon, unless you are a Mennonite or Amish. Cash for care will be on the rise in the future, but it isn't common at present.
I disagree. I think plenty of people pay with cash especially when you dont have insurance. Laser Eye surgery is paid with cash and so is plastic surgergy and lets not forget dental services. I agree that most people do pay with insurance and that includes myself, but as I have mentioned previously I have paid with cash when I used services outside my HMO. We even went to a private doctor (outside of the HMO) to get a second opinion about a condition my younger son had. Another time, we werent happy with the dematolgist (for my younger son) we had at Kaiser and we were referred to a private dr who really knew his stuff. WE paid both directly. Now, I paid with a credit card, but I could have easily paid with a check or cash. My point being, that while paying with cash isnt probably the norm, it happens more than you think.
According to the American Academy of Private Physicians, only 6000 of 900,000 physicians in the US privately contact with patients for medical care, so 0.67%
Not sure what that means. What do you mean by contact? That they pay directly? It really doesnt make a difference how many people pay with cash. If you are trying to get medical treatment and dont want anyone to see it, paying with cash is a good way to go. 0.67% represents about 2 million people assuming we have 300 million people living in the US. Which of course makes no sense as we have at minimum 11 million illegal aliens in the US and even if 25% paid with cash that would be around 3 million people.
 
I know of a P2B that was sent home from I-Day for a muscle issue discovered during the medical intake. Another that a few days before was DQed for a blood condition. It all happens. I held my breath and prayed until that oath was taken Thursday - and continue to pray. Health is not guaranteed and as PPs said, it's most important and you must take care of that first.
 
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