Delay in applying for Army/Navy/AF Scholarships?

Discussion in 'ROTC' started by 23Lt, Jul 11, 2018.

  1. 23Lt

    23Lt Member

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    I am a rising HS senior who is applying for the USNA, USMA, and USAFA.

    I am interested in the Reserve Officers’ Training Corps as an excellent alternative. I have already opened and got through half of the applications. I ran into a couple questions/thoughts.

    I want to commission as an Active Duty Officer in one of the armed forces (not sure which quite yet?)

    I have a few questions:

    1. Say I wanted to take a gap year after HS to explore colleges and reboot, would I still have the opportunity to apply for an ROTC 4 year scholarship (to all three branches) for the class of 2024? (I would be c/o 23 if I came right out of HS) Or am I ONLY eligible to apply for a 4 year scholarship for c/o 23?

    2. I want to select a major in college that is useful, and that is why I am interested in Technical majors instead of Generalist Majors. If I select a tech major, will that make me more competitive to become a 4 year scholarship winner? Also, let’s say I get the 4 year with a tech major selected and decide I want to switch to another tech major. Would that put my scholarship at risk? (I know engineering degrees are most competitive but I really don’t want to do engineering)

    2b. I’ve heard the word tech major alot. I know they help with scholarship chances but can someone explain the scope of these majors? Like give me a few good examples?


    3. If I get the scholarship, what college expenses would I still have to pay? I don’t want to sound greedy but I plan to pay back the military and our country with years and years of service.

    4. Let’s talk hypothetically:

    Let’s says I don’t get accepted into any of the service academies I apply for and decide to re apply. I want to go out-of-state for college, but what if I stayed local, attended my local state school for freshman year without doing ROTC to simply gain credits, prove myself to the academies, and reapply, this time re applying to the academies again plus apply for a 4 year ROTC scholarship to a couple out of state schools. I plan to do all four years at the out of state school. I would have a ton of credits from AP and the freshman year at the local state school to lighted the load.

    Would this plan work? Any thoughts?


    Thank you for your responses
     
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  2. kinnem

    kinnem Moderator 5-Year Member

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    You could apply for the class of 24 during your gap year. This may present some level of difficulty since you'll need to get recommendations from junior year teachers, transcripts from high school, etc. Not too hard but a few small hurdles you wouldn't have applying senior year.

    Being a tech major is no help in getting an AROTC scholarship or a NROTC MO scholarship. Around 85% of NROTC Navy Option and AFROTC scholarships are awarded to tech majors. Nevertheless, major what you want to pursue and don't pick a major just because of a scholarship opportunity. You need permission to change your major. If going from one tech to another tech it is usually granted as long as you can still graduate on time. If you were to change majors without permission then you would most likely lose your scholarship.

    Scholarships cover your tuition and fees. They also give you some money for books. You still need to pick up room and board. For AROTC you get to choose whether the scholarship is used for tuition or room and board. Almost everyone chooses tuition unless they already have another scholarship that covers tuition. If selecting the scholarship to cover room and board, then there are income tax implications. Kee in mind that only AROTC offers this choice.

    Perhaps. You're expected to attend participate in ROTC programs for 4 full years. There are restrictions on the number of credit hours you can have when you apply and you would probably exceed that. You would also need to work to ensure you don't meet the graduation requirements too soon. This is a bit of an oversimplification but you get my drift.

    A better plan is to enroll in ROTC your freshman year and compete for a scholarship while in the program. You could also re-apply to the academies while in ROTC. You may not be able to attend an out of state college without the scholarship, but we all need to make compromises in life.

    Just my two cents.
     
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  3. Falcon A

    Falcon A Member

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    I think this is a great post

    1. I don’t know about the gap year thing, so others will need to answer but I think SAT/ACT are good for 2 yrs so I think that may mean the Gap Year may be ok

    2. Navy and AF care about Tech majors. USMC and Army like them but don’t seem to stress them as much.

    3. There are subtleties but generally an ROTC scholarship pays tuition, books uniforms and a monthly stipend. You pay room and board.

    4. Transfer of credits can be tricky. You can sometimes validate classes at an SA, but I think transfer of credits is hard. Transfer of credits from one State’s local college to another State’s Univ. is also hard. Your plan might show your ability to do college work, but transfer of credits is another matter.
     
  4. 23Lt

    23Lt Member

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    Let’s say I don’t transfer any credits. Do i still have the ability to attend my in-state school for freshman year and apply for a 4 year scholarship at some out-of-state school?

    I would be fine repeating some credits if I got into a great out of state school with an ROTC schaolship, I would just like the option to decide a major and branch while at my instate college freshman year and also re apply to academies.


    I have my reasons for wanting this specific path
     
  5. MidCakePa

    MidCakePa Member

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    Couple extra thoughts: If you plan to re-apply to the academies after high school, then it will behoove you to mimic a plebe’s academic load. Meaning Calculus 1 and 2, Chemistry 1 and 2, plus freshman-level English literature and composition. And ROTC, so that you get the military component and demonstrate your commitment to becoming an officer.

    To be perfectly honest, I’m a bit confused by your OP, with its many permutations. Whatever your underlying reason is, be ready to explain it clearly in interviews and essays for nomination / appointment / scholarship.
     
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  6. brob

    brob Member

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    Great information and thought-provoking answers provided above!
    23Lt - sounds like finances are a major concern, and while this is understandable, should never be the main reason for following the path to military officer. That said, if you have a genuine interest, you may want to be aware of and take into consideration that some colleges also offer free room and board to scholarship winners - the reason being that the colleges want to attract these outstanding students to their schools. You can find which schools offer this option right on the informational websites for each service branch, but its always wise to verify this information with the ROTC unit at each school you're interested in.
     
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  7. kinnem

    kinnem Moderator 5-Year Member

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    I would add to my earlier comments that freshman year at one college is not going to help much in determining what you want to major in. That year is usually spent doing core courses like English Comp, Calculus, Physics, etc. You might get started on your major courses but will not get far into it.

    I would also add that there is nothing wrong with applying for a scholarship now and skipping the gap year. If you win a scholarship, great... then you're on your way to your out of state college. If not, you still have local Big State U as your backup plan, with or without an ROTC program, and can hopefully re-apply the following year (provided you're within credit hour guidelines).
     
  8. 23Lt

    23Lt Member

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    Money is not an issue for my family. They have said that they would help me with college.

    However I don’t want to be a burden on them. I have a goal to become an officer (and it has no connection with money. It is what I want to do) and want to be self sufficient going through college.


    The reason I want to stay local for a year is because I am going to be a recruited athlete at USAFA. I figure that if I don’t get in, I could use another year to get even better with the sport, ACT/SAT, school, EC, to get in the next year. Being a regular college student at my local U enables me to do that. I figure that if I couldn’t get in the 2nd try, I would use a 4 year ROTC scholarship to go to an out of state school and start over there (with or without credits).

    Does this seem like a feasible, logical plan?
     
  9. shock-n-awe

    shock-n-awe Member

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    Keep in mind, that all recruited athletes are also fully qualified candidates (3Q) plus DODMERB plus Nomination. So be sure you are working hard in all those areas now, and seek all nominations you are eligible for!
     
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  10. kinnem

    kinnem Moderator 5-Year Member

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    I don't understand how staying local and not participating in ROTC helps you improve your sports performance vs attending a college with ROTC, participating in ROTC with or without the scholarship, and re-applying to the academy while doing so. I'm sure I'm missing something. Your path seems more tortuous than it needs to be. Further, if you don't get into the academy the next year while participating in ROTC, then you're already 1 year into a path that leads to a commission.
     
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  11. MidCakePa

    MidCakePa Member

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    After reading the OP’s second post, makes a bit more sense. I really admire the desire to serve and to be self-sufficient in college. Now, as for the plan:

    Makes sense that you plan to apply to USAFA (though don’t overplay the “recruited athlete” angle, as many other factors supercede that at USAFA, and that status can be fleeting). Along with that, the smartest move would be to simultaneously apply for the four-year ROTC scholarship as Plan B (listing your in-state school as well as out-state schools on the application).

    Now play it out: (1) You get into USAFA...all good. (2) You don’t, but get ROTC scholarship to either in-state or out-state option...both good. (3) If #2, then you reapply to USAFA the next year. If you get in, great. If not, you’re still on a great path to becoming an officer. (4)?If not #2, you still have your original plan to fall back on. But you at least maximized your odds for success.

    Don’t overthink this. The process is hard enough. You control a lot but not as much as you think. Like most things in life: KISS.
     
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  12. AROTC-dad

    AROTC-dad Moderator

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    Have you contacted a ROO and asked this question?
     
  13. 23Lt

    23Lt Member

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    That’s probably a good idea. Where can I get in contact with one?
     
  14. AROTC-dad

    AROTC-dad Moderator

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    Last edited: Jul 13, 2018
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  15. MidCakePa

    MidCakePa Member

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    To the OP: You’ve received plenty of good advice here. Now take a mature step and turn to the most dependable source for all if your original questions: ROTC itself. AROTC-dad is practically spoon -feeding you here. Time to step up.
     
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  16. brob

    brob Member

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    Ok, thanks for sharing that additional information. Being self-sufficient and not carrying huge amounts of debt to attend college are both admirable goals.
    If you don't get in first try to USAFA, ROTC is a great option, but - you never know, it may turn out to be a better option for you anyway. I know a young man who was devastated about not getting into USAFA, but won an AFROTC scholarship - turns out he had such a great college experience and now cannot imagine having done it any other way. He commissioned and is now in pilot training - his dream!
    I'm not so sure that I agree with your plan to attend your local U with hopes of reapplying. I would search for and find other schools to apply to as a freshman which you would be excited about attending for four years, with the possibility that you may never be selected for academy. Transferring isn't all its cracked up to be and doesn't always work out for the best.
     
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  17. Pima

    Pima 10-Year Member

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    As it has been stated on prior threads, unfortunately being a recruited athlete does not equate an appointment. Currently there is a thread on USAFA regarding this subject.

    Let's go with you get the appointment as a recruited athlete. You have not stated which sport, but it really doesn't matter, all sports have an inherent risk of injury, hence on this site we joke about wrapping yourself up in bubble wrap after the appointment. There have been stories all over these boards how an appointee gets injured days or weeks prior to I Day, and after their DoDMERB exam.
    ~ They have ranged from snowboarding in late March (cast and PT until July---no go), breaking their arm playing volleyball at a graduation party (cast = no go), twisted their knee getting off the bus on I Day before the oath (medical turnback = no go).

    The importance here to understand is that all of these appointees were smart and had plan B (ROTC) in their back pocket. That scholarship is not revoked until you take your oath on I Day. Thus, for them even though they had injured their bodies prior to I Day, by the 1st day of college they would have been healed and could start the yr off in ROTC.
    ~~ Many appointees will place a deposit at that college to hold their spot, and contact the college to let them know that they intend to matriculate to USAFA, but if things go south, they will be attending their school. (This is a heated debate every year)

    Another reason to go for ROTC at a college you desire is that if you are not appointed and need to reapply than as a freshmen) you can tell the CoC that you intend to reapply. The CoC will look out for you to make sure you are prepared for USAFA, he/she can also give you a ROTC nom.
     
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  18. Wcyeung123

    Wcyeung123 Member

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    Hey there,

    Sorry for a late response. I am a rising college sophomore in NROTC. From my experience talking about hypotheticals gives more anxiety than relief, you are a HS senior, all you can do now is apply. Give yourself the option to choose.

    As far as the rotc scholarship in Navy, I’m an engineering major but did not receive a 4-year, however, I know of international study majors who did. I also know of people with a 3.9 gpa in mechanical engineering with max PFT scores that didn’t get a 4-year either. I don’t know what they had that students like me didn’t, but the Navy saw it. If you are going to do ROTC, make sure that you want it. I’m speaking from my experience, not receiving a scholarship made me realize that I want to be an officer more than anything else, but I know that I have to work harder and prove myself.

    Sorry for the tangent, if you do want to do a gap year, talk to your respective/potential ROTC unit about pathways to commission. Best of luck!
     
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