DoDMERB process for ROTC scholarship winner

Discussion in 'DoDMERB' started by Blopec8, Feb 26, 2019.

Tags:
  1. Blopec8

    Blopec8 New Member

    Joined:
    Feb 26, 2019
    Messages:
    2
    Likes Received:
    0
    DS is 4 year ROTC Scholarship winner. DoDMERB med exam appointment is this week.
    What is the TYPICAL process for this exam? Does the DS complete the medical forms and complete the exam and they base their decision on that OR do they request all medical records up front and base the decision on their exam and records? Just trying to get a timeline considering if they wait for all medical records to make their determination, it will be that much more of a lengthy process.
     
  2. AJC

    AJC Member

    Joined:
    Dec 1, 2014
    Messages:
    995
    Likes Received:
    662
    He will do the exam. It is mainly a verification of the history forms filled out.
    The exam is not the forum for additional information.
    If they require additional information they will ask for it after the exam has been processed.
    Basically if he answered no to everything it should go very quickly
     
  3. Blopec8

    Blopec8 New Member

    Joined:
    Feb 26, 2019
    Messages:
    2
    Likes Received:
    0
    Thank you---I thought so but wasn't sure if we needed to be proactive and request all records ahead of time or if the DoDMERB only did that if deemed necessary. Appreciate the response!
     
  4. kinnem

    kinnem Moderator 5-Year Member

    Joined:
    Oct 21, 2010
    Messages:
    12,008
    Likes Received:
    5,670
    Be sure your DS only answers 'yes' to something for which he has a diagnosis. For example, you and/or he may think he might have asthma, but if it hasn't been diagnosed as asthma by a doctor then he should answer 'no' to ever had asthma. I've seen kids create difficulties by answering questions like this incorrectly.
     
    Pima and Falcon A like this.
  5. AJC

    AJC Member

    Joined:
    Dec 1, 2014
    Messages:
    995
    Likes Received:
    662
    This is the one area where the parent should get involved.
    You should at least review the DoDMERB submission(s) for accuracy.
    In most cases the average 17 year old does not have a detailed knowledge of their medical history.
    In fact my son said "I have to ask my dad" to the DoDMREB technician so many times she asked to speak with me.
    He could not recall the details of his concussion when he was 13, go figure.
     
    Falcon A likes this.
  6. Freedom1776

    Freedom1776 Member

    Joined:
    Dec 20, 2018
    Messages:
    85
    Likes Received:
    45
    I would request all medical records from your doctor for when you fill out the forms. I couldn't remember most doctor's visits from when I was very young, so looking at their notes helped me complete the medical history
     
    cookiemom159 likes this.
  7. MtJo

    MtJo Member

    Joined:
    Jun 4, 2018
    Messages:
    111
    Likes Received:
    70
    For every yes you check on the medical form, be prepared to have a medical record go with that. It will be requested after his health exam is complete. We had to submit AMI three different times. It was the same information just submitted again with a Dr. note. Thankfully, we went to one clinic as he was growing up so the records were not that hard to come by. However, handwritten notes are a bear to read. Sign of the times! There was one electronic record we had to submit-it was at least 10 pages!
     
  8. Impulsive

    Impulsive Member

    Joined:
    Feb 4, 2019
    Messages:
    359
    Likes Received:
    156
    I will preface this by saying this is just MY opinion........Above all else....BE HONEST! If you have some sort of issue in the past or present be honest about it. A problem could very well arise later on that could cause problems. Say for example, you hurt your back in rough housing with friends when you were 13. You had minor treatment and physical therapy a couple of times, and have had no problems since. You check "no" to any back issues. While in ROTC, the Academy, or on Active Duty, you hurt your back again. They do MRI's and CAT scans with contrast and find a evidence of an old injury (and I am pretty sure it can be found). Now you have lied on a government form, and the government can separate you without any VA benefits. Not that it IS going to happen, but it could and is it worth the risk?

    As mentioned above in this forum, there is no need to answer "Yes" to something you never had treated, has not bothered you since, or has never been "diagnosed", that is asking for additional work or possible problems. But any surgeries, documented injuries, or current problems should be discussed with your parents and maybe your family doc at length, before submitting the self history.

    Be Honest, if it is not a problem now, either a remedial or a waiver will take care of it, but it will be in your record and you are covered (aggravation in service is considered to be service-connected and benefits will help). If it is serious enough to cause you to consider not reporting it because you don't want to bring it up, you risk problems down the road. Not always, but it could happen. We told both our sons' make sure everything is filled out right, we even mentioned wisdom teeth, a childhood allergy problem, and a minor ankle sprain....just so they would not have to worry in the future. They did the remedials, and were cleared in under a month. We all felt better not having to possibly explain later about something re-occurring. If you think the issue could be serious enough to even possibly effect your ability to perform your duties, either have it fixed or get it waived. Do you really want to enter the military if you are going to have problems serving?? There are tons of way to serve your country not in the military..:)