ROTC- Chances of acceptance

Discussion in 'ROTC' started by Kevin, Sep 17, 2017.

  1. Kevin

    Kevin Member

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    Hi, I was wanting to join an ROTC program preferable air force or navy, but I'm not too sure about my chances.
    Earlier this year I decided that I wanted to join ROTC and it has been growing on me ever since. My first year of college out of high school begins in the autumn semester of 2018. I received a 28 composite score on the ACT, and I'm a College credit plus student. By the end of this year I should have about 46 college credit hours (depending on what I take next semester). I also plan on majoring in Mechanical or aeronautical and astronautical engineering. My high school GPA is around 4.1 and my college GPA is probably about 3.8-3.9.
    This is all I have. If someone could give me an idea if I even have a chance at getting accepted that would be great.
     
  2. kinnem

    kinnem Moderator 5-Year Member

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    There is a lot of missing but necessary info in what you provided.

    First you do not mention which ROTC program(s) you are interested in. Your proposed STEM major would be helpful for Air Force or Navy who require very high percentages of STEM majors. Not so much with Army and the Marine Corps who don't really care what your major is. The additional college credits, while nice as an indication of your abilities, are not too relevant. In any ROTC program you are generally expected to do 4 years of college. Also, any college you attend may, or may not, accept most of those credits. Many colleges require that certain (core) courses be taken as part of their degree program.

    ROTC scholarship awards and academy acceptances revolve around Scholastics, Athletics, and Leadership. You mention some of your academic/scholastic stats which are, frankly, about average. You make no mention of athletics, leadership, volunteering and other aspects that are important to an application. An officer is a leader, including athletically, so you will need to demonstrate that you are such a leader. Perhaps you have all of those requirements but failed to mention them. Regardless, these are all areas you can work on and if you have it, you can work on improving. This is a competition. You need to be better than the person next to you. Good luck.
     
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  3. Kevin

    Kevin Member

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    Thanks for the help!
     
  4. ProudDad17

    ProudDad17 Member

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    +1 to @kinnem. Also, you ask about your chances of being "accepted" into an ROTC program. I assume by this what you really mean is your chances of earning a scholarship. All the things @kinnem mentioned play into the scholarship decisions. Even if you do not earn a 4 year scholarship, you can still apply to and be "accepted" into an ROTC unit as a college programmer. Once there, you can compete for other scholarships. NROTC is reducing the number of 4 year scholarships in favor of awarding more 2 and 3 year scholarships to midshipmen who join as college programmers and prove themselves in the battalion. From what I have seen AROTC also seems to award a lot of 2 and 3 year scholarships, which can then be upgraded at the campus level for proven performance.
     
  5. Humey

    Humey Member

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    In other words, any idiot can join Rotc, getting a scholarship and staying in Rotc is another question:)
     
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  6. PMR

    PMR Member

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    There are some good books on Amazon about how to prep for the scholarship application. I ordered one for my son by LTC Robert Kirkland, who is a retired PMS. Had some great tips and insights, including "You must have four years remaining in an approved college program to be eligible for the scholarship. If you have to many college credits, you may disqualify yourself". This is an Army-specific book, but may apply to all. Good luck.
     
  7. Kevin

    Kevin Member

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    Ideally I would love to get a 4-year scholar ship; however, my main goal is to graduate having the same status others that go through the ROTC program. I have heard that by your junior year you need to be on a scholar ship though, meaning that you can only be a programmer for the first two years.
    Also, while I don't need the scholarship for financial reasons, I was just curious if colleges will grant scholarships for being a programmer.

    Everyone thanks for the help, I really appreciate it.
     
  8. ProudDad17

    ProudDad17 Member

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    This will depend on which branch of ROTC you are in. Here is the process for NROTC. In your senior year of high school, apply for the 4 year scholarship. If you are awarded this, excellent work! If not, you can join a unit as a college programmer and reapply for the same 4 year scholarship in the first semester of college. If you are not awarded the four year scholarship at that time, you would apply for a three year scholarship in the spring of your freshman year. At this time you will be judged on your performance in college and in your unit. It is a national competition and you will be competing against other college freshman applying for the same scholarship. If you are not awarded a three year scholarship, you would apply for a two year scholarship in the spring of your sophomore year. Again, this is a national competition against other sophomores. If you are not awarded a two year scholarship, you will automatically be considered for advanced standing. If, at the end of your sophomore year, you have not earned a scholarship or advanced standing, you would be dis enrolled from the NROTC unit. If you are awarded a scholarship or advanced standing and complete all the requirements, you will graduate and receive your commission the same as any other NROTC midshipman.

    That is the quick and dirty overview of NROTC.
     
  9. kinnem

    kinnem Moderator 5-Year Member

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    Every ROTC program has some form of cutoff after two years where some form of approval is needed to continue in the program.

    In AFROTC it's selection for Summer Field Training (SFT). If you're not selected you are dropped from the program. To some extent the selection process (besides being driven by merit) is determined by the needs of the AF. Some years the selection rate can be low because AF doesn't need as many officers. This selection process applies to all cadets, not just those who are not on scholarship.

    In AROTC and NROTC you must be approved for "advanced standing". Approval does not put you on "scholarship" but it does entitle you to the monthly stipend while you are in college.

    In general, if you keep your nose clean, work hard, and excel at what you do, you will be approved for advanced standing.
     
  10. Humey

    Humey Member

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    When my son with to AF Field Training the summer before Junior year (summer of 2016), 100% of the cadets went. I think this years's class has about the same percentage. As kinnem said, depending on the wants to the AF, that percentage goes up and down. Also, my son never got a dime from Rotc outside of the monthly stipend he has received since junior year
     
  11. katiewingo11

    katiewingo11 Member

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    There are 2 and 3 year programs as well. A fellow cadet of mine is doing the 2 year program and he has field training after his first year in AFROTC.
     
  12. Kevin

    Kevin Member

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    Does the college that I attend change the chances of getting accepted into one of the ROTC programs (air force, navy, army)? For example, would I have better chances of getting a scholarship or becoming a programmer if I applied to a cheaper college, because then it wouldn't cost them as much for me to go to that college. And/or would my chances increase if I went to a military school like Virginia Military Institute or Virginia-tech rather than The Ohio State University (note that I am an Ohio resident)?

    Thanks.