USCGA to ROTC

Discussion in 'ROTC' started by warrior37, Mar 12, 2017.

  1. warrior37

    warrior37 New Member

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    Hi all,

    I currently am a 4/c (Freshman) at the USCGA but I've decided that I want to serve as an officer in the Marine Corps or Army. I want to be an officer in a more combat-oriented branch where I feel like I'll be able to contribute more to America's military and truly be serving my country. I also want to enjoy more of the freedom and gain more of the life experience that I may be missing out in at a regular college. Would I be making a huge step down by transferring out of here?

    I plan to stay here through the end of next year and be sure that I'm making the right decision, but I want to have a solid plan for where I'll be transferring to. I've been doing research into possibly earning a two-year Army or Naval ROTC scholarship.

    One of my main concerns was whether I'd even be qualified enough to transfer and and if picking up a two year ROTC scholarship is even possible. Being at a service academy my gpa is naturally a bit lower than some other transfer students that I'm competing against, but does the fact that I'm coming from a service academy and am transferring for the purpose of wanting to serve in a different branch/experience normal college help? Or am I still just judged by the numbers on my transcript? Basically, how would a regular college and ROTC view me compared to others?

    Also how tough is it to get a two-year scholarship either for Army or Naval ROTC? I feel since the Army is bigger, my chances of earning a scholarship through them are much greater. I was a bit worried, however, that I could end up not getting commissioned into active duty...can anyone comment on this? I have also heard of the Army's Leadership Training Course which seems to be geared towards people in my position. Would I be able to attend this in the summer between sophomore and junior year?

    Can I just get some advice on what you guys think my best option is? (even your opinion on staying here vs leaving would help)
     
  2. BerryJam

    BerryJam Member

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    Warrior, you had to write one hell of an essay to get into CGA. What did you talk about in that personal statement? Oh I know, young people change their minds. Deciding that academy/military life isn't what they wanted after all is one thing, but you have decided that you want a combat-oriented environment and the freedom of regular college. You knew what the mission of the Coast Guard was all about. If you lied about why you wanted to be at CGA, then you absolutely should leave because you never wanted it in the first place. As the parent of a prospective cadet who is waiting anxiously for an admissions decision, we can’t help but wonder what you wrote in your statement to convince admissions that you wanted and deserved an appointment. My kid’s essay was dripping with examples of ways in which he plans to work hard to contribute to the CGA corps of cadets should he be lucky enough to get the call. It was laced with examples of his honor, integrity and devotion to duty. And it’s all true. Unfortunately I can’t answer any of your questions, but your change of heart just 8 months into your freshman year is puzzling. It makes me hurt for all the kids who want to truly be there, and who will gladly serve their country through the mission of the Coast Guard. Did something happen to make you change your mind, or did you just accept an appointment that you didn't really want?
     
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  3. Humey

    Humey Member

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    I think your response was pretty harsh . What makes it worse for me as you being a parent of a prospective cadet, you seem to take it personally as if this person or another person like him will somehow prevent your child from entering the academy. These are young kids who at 17 had to decide what they wanted to do with the rest of their life How many kids enter college with one major and go through 3 other majors until they figure out what they are going to study . I don't know BarryJam so I don't know his motivation. Maybe he started wanting one thing but realized in the academy that he wanted to something else. Maybe his perception of being in the CG didn't match his reality when he went into the academy. Better that he came up with this now instead of waiting until his third year. Finally while it's a great honor to be accepted in the academy, in the end it has to be a right fit . Until one attends u will never really know. Sometimes it works and sometimes it doesnt


     
  4. Jcc123

    Jcc123 5-Year Member

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    @BerryJam, @Humey is a master of understatement. Your reply was out of line. It seems you might be letting the stress of your son's appointment process get to you; maybe take a step back and try to gain a little perspective.
     
  5. ProudDad17

    ProudDad17 Member

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    @warrior37 I don't think a 2 year NROTC scholarship would be possible for you. The 2 and 3 year NROTC scholarships are for midshipmen who joins the unit as college programmers and have proven their worth by performing well in the NROTC unit. You wouldn't be able to just walk into the unit with one of these scholarships. If you were to transfer to a college with an NROTC unit next year and participate as a college program member, you could potentially compete for a 2 year scholarship after that. This would mean no scholarship money for at least one year and you would be competing against other midshipmen who had been with the program for a year longer than you. I can't speak to the Army's process. I think your best bet would be to talk to a PNS/PMS at the unit you are interested in joining. Good luck to you in making the right decision for you.
     
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  6. No1Fanof2

    No1Fanof2 Member

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    It's difficult to be a SA and being at the smallest one can compound the difficulty. The types of majors to chose from doesn't fit everyone either.

    @warrior37 I agree with what proud dad has said. If my DD felt the same way I would suggest for her to leave (after this year) entering in as a college sophomore programmer. Giving time to rebuild a resume competitive enough for the 2 year NROTC scholarship. I Would be worried about falling into a category of having to prove yourself all over again with a tinge in your application of not really knowing where you want to be. Navy and Army are pretty different from each other. I think you need to narrow it down to one option to prove to the ones holding the keys you are serious about it. I would think the year of college life as a college programmer will be challenging for the reasons I have already said. I also believe the Army 2 year ROTC is not a guarantee for active duty.
     
  7. kinnem

    kinnem Moderator 5-Year Member

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    I believe you'll be ineligible to apply for the NROTC MO scholarship, as you'll have too many credit hours. If you transfer at the end of freshman year you MIGHT be OK to apply. Check the requirements online. In any case do not expect to complete your studies at your new college in just two years... NROTC is designed to be a 4 year program. You could do Marine Option in 3 years, or perhaps quicker, but almost certainly not in two. There are 6 semesters worth of NROTC academics for a Marine Option not counting the required core courses. You would need to sit down with the cadre to work out your education plan and determine what can be accomplished.

    Go into this with eyes wide open. Do you know what you would want to do in the Corps or in the Army? Keep in mind you don't always get your first choice, nor your second, and perhaps not your third. Would you be willing to serve in those circumstances?
     
  8. BerryJam

    BerryJam Member

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    You're right, I was, and I do apologize. The CGA chose him for good reasons, and that's a great accomplishment. I had a hard time understanding that with all the homework and research that goes into applying to an academy, how someone could change their mind so quickly. But it sounds like it does happen, so thank you for setting me straight. I sincerely wish the OP great success in wherever his paths leads.
     
  9. Capt MJ

    Capt MJ 10-Year Member

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    Mind-changing does occur, and is a predictable and expected outcome for many SA cadets and mids. This is why the service obligation doesn't kick in until the start of junior year, a policy change done many years ago. The totally committed, SA or bust appointee realizes that path is just not right once he or she is there. All the SA visits, reading and research, sports and STEM camps, summer programs - none of it is the real thing, only a glimpse.

    Many parents are surprised and shocked by that call home that says "I don't want this anymore," after the crazy-making campaign to get in.

    The only issue I had with OP's first post was the "truly serving" comment. I regard every CG member as someone who is truly serving. Missions are different, but they go in harm's way too.

    OP may be in a transitory funk, seeing greener grass elsewhere, and all could be well as soon as spring hits or he/she has s great summer training experience. Or, they could be forming a resolve that won't be shaken and are exploring alternative paths.
     
  10. Jcleppe

    Jcleppe 5-Year Member

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    Thank you from an old Coastie.

    .....And yes they do, not just when deployed.
     
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  11. Jcleppe

    Jcleppe 5-Year Member

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    The best thing for you to do is try and contact a ROO at an Army ROTC battalion at the school where you would like to transfer. You would most likely not need to go to the summer training to catch up to AROTC since you have spent a year at the USCGA, if you do transfer there would still be a chance you would go with other cadets if you were able to contract in time, I'm referring to CIET. I agree that the opportunity of obtaining a scholarship through AROTC may be better. You would probably not be offered a scholarship for your sophomore year but if you work hard, bring your GPA up and have a solid APFT, you will better your chances for scholarship your final 2 years. This all depends on how you do and what is available from the battalion, something you should discuss with the ROO when you talk with them.
     
  12. 4myboy

    4myboy Member

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    Really Harsh!
     
  13. ProudDad17

    ProudDad17 Member

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    The service obligation kicks in start of Sophomore year.
     
  14. ProudDad17

    ProudDad17 Member

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  15. Jcleppe

    Jcleppe 5-Year Member

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    I believe the obligation starts the beginning of the junior year for all SAs,

    The obligation does start sophomore year for ROTC scholarship cadets and mids.
     
  16. Humey

    Humey Member

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    Well I didnt want to attack the guy. Also, I screwed up. I referred to the person with the original question as BarryJam when it was Warrior37 and BarryJam was the person I was responding too. Just in case anybody cares

     
  17. 4myboy

    4myboy Member

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    Noted! It's an emotional time, we all understand. This boy was only asking for help . I'm sure he could have worded it differently but is obviously a great candidate
     
  18. MohawkArmyROTC

    MohawkArmyROTC Recruiting Operations Officer

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    In regards to Army ROTC, your GPA at the USCGA will not affect your ability to earn a 2YR scholarship. It will only affect the college admissions process and credits transferred. The GPA at your new school is what determines whether you are awarded the Army ROTC scholarship. Depending on how the transfer goes you will have 3 to 3.5 years until you graduate from the new college. Your time at the USCGA would give you equivalent credit for the Freshman Army ROTC class, and you are already DODMERB qualified which is good. What is your intended major, as I have a few schools in the Capital District of NY that I could refer you to.
     
  19. campe18

    campe18 Member

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    I had similar feelings at USAFA between my sophomore and junior year. I was on Operation Air Force and my high school girlfriend broke up with me over the phone. I was devastated. I just kept thinking if I could only be home then everything would work out and she would want to be with me. I could go to Ohio State or some other school and all my problems would be solved.

    I went home when my leave came around to find that she really didn't want to get back together with me "ever". I was an emotional wreck! But deep down I still thought if only I guit the Academy then everything would be fine. I had completely lost focus.

    Over massive tears and uncontrollable sobbing I told my parents. They told me to give it a day or two and see how I felt. My mind was already made up though. About an hour later my Dad came upstairs to my room (which he never did). My Dad and I were not very close. He was a very strong authoritarian (enlisted Marine) who showed little emotion besides anger. I was sitting on the floor facing away from the door when he came into my room. He sat down on the bed and through tears in a very hushed and quiet voice told me that he and my Mom had made all the decisions for me growing up but this one was mine to make. He even apologized for not allowing me to make more decisions as a kid. Lastly he said he would support whatever decision I made. Then he left. That was so unbelievably unlike the man I grew up fearing. He didn't scream or berate me like I had expected. He wasn't treating me like a little kid anymore.

    That was the defining moment of my life. I hadn't expected that and now it was truly in my hands to decide. I sat there for two or three hours thinking of my decision from every conceivable angle. I thought of all I went through to get appointed to the Academy and of all my friends there.

    I slept like a baby that night because I knew I was making the right decision to go back and finish. I had regained my focus. You probably think that was the best decision I ever made in my life... it wasn't... the best was telling my Dad over the phone15 months ago how important that moment was to me and how I never would have retired 28.5 years later without his words that night. We both cried a lot and he was very humble and would take no credit. He told me it was all me and that I knew what I needed to do.

    He died 3 days later.

    I only tell you this so you know we all struggle with similar thoughts. Your path may be different then mine. I would suggest you talk it over with your family and friends. You may be surprised at the wisdom they can impart. Only you know the truth that lies in your heart. I trust you will do the right thing and excel at whatever that is!
     
  20. needlasereyesurgerypronto

    needlasereyesurgerypronto Member

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    Reading that was amazing