gymnastics82@@@

New Member
Joined
Jan 27, 2020
Messages
2
Hi,

I have been interested in joining the Air Force for years now. I am 23 and have decided it is finally time. The only thing I am still unsure about is the medical history, what disqualifies you, what you can get a waiver for, and checking medical records. I have been told so many times to lie about medical history but I would rather not.

The first topic I want to know about is thyroid conditions. January of 2019 I found out I had hyperthyroidism after blood work. I got a thyroid scan and was told it was Graves Disease. I went on medication (methimazole) and it helped a ton. I saw a specialist months later and she was convinced it was not Graves disease. Around May of 2019 my labs came back normal, my thyroid was functioning properly so I was taken off medication. Around the end of June, I got another blood test and my thyroid was functioning properly off medication. I moved to a new state during this time and did not follow up with a new doctor until October. I had blood taken in October of 2019 and my thyroid was still functioning properly off medication. I have read that 12 months of no medication and the thyroid working normal, you are able to enlist. Is this correct?

Random side note, I was being treated for anxiety and put on medication for it but it turns out it was just symptoms of my thyroid disease which I did not know I had. I am sure that can just be waiver or overseen due to the cause being my thyroid and not actual anxiety. (Symptoms were increased heart rate, very hot all the time, panic attacks, etc)

Next is migraines. I have had migraines since I was about 10 years old. I have been on medication for them but that was over 8 years ago and only for a very short time period. I have not been on medication for them since. In the past few years I have been getting less and less of them. I have read this from some websites:

See specifically paragraphs 27e, 27f, and 27g, of Enclosure (4), for migraines and headaches.
e. History of headaches (784.0), including but not limited to migraines (346) and tension headaches (307.81) that:
(1) Are severe enough to disrupt normal activities (such as loss of time from school or work) of more than twice per year in the past 2 years.
(2) Require prescription medications more than twice per year within the last 2 years.
f. Migraine (346) or migraine variant (346.2) associated with neurological deficits other than scotoma.
g. Cluster headaches (339.0).
I would say my migraines do not happen twice a year, and if they do, I can push myself to do things. I have done an entire hike with a migraine, completed a full workday and school with a migraine. They can disrupt a day if I let it. But I would say the past 2 years I rarely get them, not like I used to. The other points do not seem to apply to me, these are just random and are not associated with anything. I do get the aura (blind spots) for about 20 minutes then the headache. Again, this is very rare. I have read about a waiver, and you could potentially only be allowed to be in a specific category of jobs? Not too sure about that. I also want to add I have spoken to doctors over the years about migraines so it will say migraine in my medical record and not headache. At a very young age I was told they are "classic migraines." I have never had tests or imaging done for it.


I have read many different things about medical records. I heard they can not pull them, but everything I hear is different. I have been on Tricare from birth to age 23 (My dad was Air Force then I married my husband who was a Marine). A recruiter once told me they can pull all Tricare records so they would have everything. I am not sure how true that is. What I do not want to happen, is I lie about my migraines or thyroid, something acts up while I am in the military and I go to the doctor. They decide to pull my medical records and see everything that I said I did not have and they kick me out (I have read this in numerous places online).

My point is, I do not want to lie, but still want to be able to join. Sure if some reason I can't, that is okay. What are your thoughts? About what I should or shouldn't say? How I should disclose this information (like saying I get headaches but not specifically migraines). Will a recruiter even talk to me if I am not at the 12 month mark with being thyroid issue free? Thank you! Any and all information is appreciated!
 

MullenLE

A GUY WITH "INTRICATE KNOWLEGE" OF DODMERB
10-Year Member
Joined
May 31, 2008
Messages
6,102
I'll answer in this way:

Never lie! If you lie, you are subject to fraudulent enlistment charges.

Are you referring to Enlisting or applying to an ROTC program? If ROTC, go to https://dodmerb.traicare.osd.mil

Hit Questions About the Process.

Read paragraphs 11-21.
 

gymnastics82@@@

New Member
Joined
Jan 27, 2020
Messages
2
I'll answer in this way:

Never lie! If you lie, you are subject to fraudulent enlistment charges.

Are you referring to Enlisting or applying to an ROTC program? If ROTC, go to https://dodmerb.traicare.osd.mil

Hit Questions About the Process.

Read paragraphs 11-21.

Thank you! Ya I do not want to lie and do not plan on it. I have heard about the fraudulent charges. I would rather be disqualified than get charged. I was referring to Enlisting but I will go ahead and check out the link you provided as well.
 

Capt MJ

Ancient Mariner, Salt-Encrusted
10-Year Member
Joined
Sep 27, 2008
Messages
12,378
Thank you! Ya I do not want to lie and do not plan on it. I have heard about the fraudulent charges. I would rather be disqualified than get charged. I was referring to Enlisting but I will go ahead and check out the link you provided as well.

Your original post was quite detailed as you shared with us your thinking and possible options.

Or - you could simply declare “I will truthfully answer the questions asked to the best of my ability.” That cuts through everything. If you answer candidly, then you never have to remember what you said or didn’t say, or how you shaded a description. Then let the system work.

These DQ items are meant to keep others safe. As you know from your family situation, military people can operate in harsh, remote, high-pressure environments, far from advanced medical care, with high stress levels, where unit readiness can be of critical importance.
 
Top