Another Chapter In GO/FO Breaking Bad

Old Navy BGO

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I don't think anyone actually lived through a keel-hauling did they? With the barnacles and the length of time underwater from one gunwale to the other, it seems like living through it would be a 50/50 proposition.
I'm guessing if anyone survived, they wished they didn't - I imagine the Barnacles would cut someone up pretty bad, and the independant duty corpsman in those days wasn't half as good as our good Devil Doc. Dying of infection (or with infection) would be a pretty miserable way to go.

Can I get butter instead of the olive oil?
I don't think there was any butter OR olive oil involved...just bread, and water.
 

Wishful

"Land of the free, because of the brave..."
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My step-father (a Navy man) told me that back in the day in the British Navy, "flogged thru the fleet" was the punishment for striking an officer. Obviously after being flogged on several ships, the sailor was a corpse...& his corpse was taken to each ship & flogged.
It that the opening of Mutiny on the Bounty?
 

Capt MJ

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Technically, the bread and water was “diminished rations.” As long as the caloric content was sufficient, it could be something like baby food. Puréed peas. Puréed prunes. Bland, flavorless, goopy.

The day of Article 15/Captain’s Mast/NJP counted as the first day of any punishment. Sooooo, if you held mast just after midnight while at sea...After all, people are up, might as well let those found guilty fully benefit from their awarded punishment.
 

Wishful

"Land of the free, because of the brave..."
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Losing⭐⭐'s for adultery; sex between consenting adults with no injured victim(s)...that's what I call sending a message.
This is when it goes downhill for all involved; I've witnessed this so many times when the subordinate starts to exercise power they don't have...a monster is created:

But after their relationship started, witnesses said her performance took a nosedive. She began acting “buddy-buddy” with colonels who outranked her, as if they were peers, witnesses said, and her professionalism went from “lackadaisical to non-existent.” She began acting aggressively to the staff and behaved as if she had more authority than she actually did.

In LE, the saying goes, "She pinned on his stars."
Her professionalism went from “lackadaisical to non-existent” how does one document that on a OPR??;)
 
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Wishful

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From one who's been there:
The other side of the coin is now: what if you're her new supervisor? Congratulations!! Lucky you!!
1st. off: You'll be officially notified that if you retaliate, you'll be a subject of an investigation.
This "notification" essentially makes the subordinate "hands off" for most supervisors. The subordinate can & will allege any attempt at discipline as retaliation.
The way to go is to address this subordinate (& all others) is that it is always about their work performance.
Assume you're being recorded. All statements to the subordinate are always work performance-related.

And what if you document their poor performance?? Well, the 1st question (from EEO authorities) will be: "Which other of your subordinates have you documented this type/other poor performance?"...None? You're targeting. Down the rabbit hole we go.
So to do it right, one would have to keep a file on each subordinate; updated with the latest infractions & your progressive addressing of them
...or just be "hands off" with this one...
Which way do you think it plays out in real life??:rolleyes::rolleyes:
 

UHBlackhawk

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From one who's been there:
The other side of the coin is now: what if you're her new supervisor? Congratulations!! Lucky you!!
1st. off: You'll be officially notified that if you retaliate, you'll be a subject of an investigation.
This "notification" essentially makes the subordinate "hands off" for most supervisors. The subordinate can & will allege any attempt at discipline as retaliation.
The way to go is to address this subordinate (& all others) is that it is always about their work performance.
Assume you're being recorded. All statements to the subordinate are always work performance-related.

And what if you document their poor performance?? Well, the 1st question (from EEO authorities) will be: "Which other of your subordinates have you documented this type/other poor performance?"...None? You're targeting. Down the rabbit hole we go.
So to do it right, one would have to keep a file on each subordinate; updated with the latest infractions & your progressive addressing of them
...or just be "hands off" with this one...
Which way do you think it plays out in real life??:rolleyes::rolleyes:
Kill them with kindness on the next fitness eval. . This does take time, but they are difficult to appeal.
 

T-37IP

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This is a failure of leadership up and down the chain, and a habit of looking the other way due to mutually assured destruction. There is no way his leadership wasn't well aware of his activities for years and chose to ignore it. He should be jailed, just like they would crush a junior enlisted, or a Lt. I've seen the behavior up close and personal in flying squadrons. The leadership hypocrisy is breathtaking. Rant over.
 

flieger83

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A sailor in the rack recovering from corporal punishment is not a working sailor. Port and starboard watches plus worst jobs on the ship plus no rum, if I were way back in the day. Head down scrubbing the pooper on a windy day back in the days of sail, ugh.
Okay...that sounds good...
 

flieger83

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Are/were you aware that an afloat CO could sentence someone to three days bread and water? This was still in effect until 2019
I was, actually. CaptMJ and I have "offline chatted" about my "saltwater blood..." The choice of USAFA and USNA was VERY hard...

I'm that geeky "I wasn't in the navy, can never claim I was, but I sure have studied it/them!" Heck...how many AF pilots have the complete "Naval Chronicles" in their books? I've been fascinated by the London Gazette "letters" during the Napoleonic wars...the things that folks in the Navies of the world did then...Hollywood can't write that stuff!
(Read about Lord Cochrane)

And to the others..."keel hauling" was effectively a death sentence. It's hard to find actual accounts of it, however, I have seen a couple in Gazette's of LONG ago and in some books of the period. Military justice then, as now, was a tad...convoluted. Take the example of Admiral Byng...

Steve
 

flieger83

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Technically, the bread and water was “diminished rations.” As long as the caloric content was sufficient, it could be something like baby food. Puréed peas. Puréed prunes. Bland, flavorless, goopy.

The day of Article 15/Captain’s Mast/NJP counted as the first day of any punishment. Sooooo, if you held mast just after midnight while at sea...After all, people are up, might as well let those found guilty fully benefit from their awarded punishment.
Without objection, I would like to revise my earlier remark.

I take back my comment about soft...

This is...devious.

I love it!
 

Old Navy BGO

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According to one brother, you weren’t a real officer until you had been in HACQ.
> I think its spelled Hack..... but then, I've never seen the term in any formal document , so maybe I've been spelling it wrong all these years and it is really an acronym for something.

A bit of trivia, the entire Naval Academy Brigade of Midshipman was put in Hack during Beat Army week in 1982 (I think it was 1982, the year I was a Third Class). The back story is pretty long, but long story short, Midshipmen were enaged in the normal Army week hijinks, and a couple took it a little far (the ending was a Jimmy Legs patrol car locked in T-Court with lights and siren going). The Administration took a dim view toward messing with the Jimmy Leg's and the 'Dant ordered everyone out to indoor formation in the middle of the night. Imagine 4000 midshipman in various forms of sleepwear getting a middle of the night A$$ chewing, ending with the order that we were all "In hack" until the perpetrators turned themselves in-- when we heard that, everyone looked at each other (Upperclass and plebes alike) with the same expression of "what the he!! is hack ?"

Good news is that the whole thing was sorted out by noon meal, and the Brigade wide hack was lifted.
 

UHBlackhawk

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> I think its spelled Hack..... but then, I've never seen the term in any formal document , so maybe I've been spelling it wrong all these years and it is really an acronym for something.

A bit of trivia, the entire Naval Academy Brigade of Midshipman was put in Hack during Beat Army week in 1982 (I think it was 1982, the year I was a Third Class). The back story is pretty long, but long story short, Midshipmen were enaged in the normal Army week hijinks, and a couple took it a little far (the ending was a Jimmy Legs patrol car locked in T-Court with lights and siren going). The Administration took a dim view toward messing with the Jimmy Leg's and the 'Dant ordered everyone out to indoor formation in the middle of the night. Imagine 4000 midshipman in various forms of sleepwear getting a middle of the night A$$ chewing, ending with the order that we were all "In hack" until the perpetrators turned themselves in-- when we heard that, everyone looked at each other (Upperclass and plebes alike) with the same expression of "what the he!! is hack ?"

Good news is that the whole thing was sorted out by noon meal, and the Brigade wide hack was lifted.
I thought it was HACQ for House Arrest Confinement to Quarters.
He was a practical joker, though he knew when to be serious and had a very successful career.
He was an ‘82 grad but would have been involved in stuff like that. He didn’t get to come home on a break more than once.
 

Old Navy BGO

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I beg to differ. It's HACQ (pronounced "Hack"). The CQ part means Confined to Quarters.
I thought it was HACQ for House Arrest Confinement to Quarters.

That makes sense....it's always good to learn something every day ...even if it has not practical use !
By the way, A6E spelled it "hack"--either a Navy thing, or pilots can't spell.
(Picking on pilots is almost as fun as teasing Marines...)
 
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