AROTC Increasing Chances to Admission to Universities?

nad501

Member
Hello! I just received a four-year scholarship to three very competitive Ivy's. I was wondering if receiving the Army ROTC will increase my chances of admitting to these schools at all? It says my scholarships to these schools were based on the available number of Army ROTC slots at the unit at that specific university? Does that mean I placed into that unit so I have a higher chance of admitting to the school? I am very confused and would love some advice! Thank you so much!
 

AROTC-dad

Moderator
5-Year Member
It depends on the particular Ivy, but it cannot hurt to get in touch with the ROO of AROTC program for each school and ask for guidance. At the least it may be helpful to notify the admissions department (talk to the ROO first).

The issue is that Ivy's typically have large endowments so they don't necessarily find a "full retail" Army scholarship candidate as attractive as a lesser known college might.

But definitely speak to the ROO's. Some of them may have varying degrees of influence. It may also depend on how difficult the ROO's recruiting mission is this year. If he/she is not getting enough new cadets, he may jump and go to bat for you.

Congratulations on the scholarship!
 
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nad501

Member
It depends on the particular Ivy, but it cannot hurt to get in touch with the ROO of AROTC program for each school and ask for guidance. At the least it may be helpful to notify the admissions department (talk to the ROO first).

The issue is that Ivy's typically have large endowments so they don't necessarily find a "full retail" Army scholarship candidate as attractive as a lesser known college might.

But definitely speak to the ROO's. Some of them may have varying degrees of influence. It may also depend on how difficult the ROO's recruiting mission is this year. If he/she is not getting enough new cadets, he may jump and go to bat for you.

Congratulations on the scholarship!
Thank you so much!

One question- what do you mean by ROO?
 

AROTC-dad

Moderator
5-Year Member
One question- what do you mean by ROO?
First of all, you need to read the Acronym link:
https://www.serviceacademyforums.com/index.php?threads/the-acronym-list.11568/

Secondly, to answer your question:

ROO = Recruiting Operations Officer, which is the cadre member at all Army ROTC colleges who is responsible for meeting their battalion cadet mission. (Other branches use different terminology...for example the Marines call them Officer Selection Officers or OSO's. )

THIS is the wrong kind of ROO.




On this Forum, @MohawkArmyROTC and @clarksonarmy are both ROO's and very active here.
 
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CrewDad

Member
ALL schools like it when you are paying for the education. This can be Wala Wala College or Harvard. The source don’t matter your parent, Scholarships, etc. Any schools and even top wealthy schools will evaluate your qualification first. If you are a winner of national merit scholarship such as ROTC and other merit based scholarships, it is a sign and confirmation that you are highly competitive and diligent to apply to such programs. It shows your commitment and maturity. This also sets you apart from your parent sponsoring your education.

Bottom line, it adds to your character and quality. So yes having won a merit based scholarship such as ROTC is a positive reflection on your application to which ever schools you are applying to. It adds certainty that the student has all serious intent to pursue military service through their schools. Based on my recent interaction with admissions and accepted students currently enrolled in ROTC Program at some highly selective colleges, about 50% are admitted to their as ROTC Scholarship winner. This is a small sample size so don’t take this to the bank. But it is positive.

For all those merit based scholarship winners, great job!
 

DanGir

5-Year Member
I can tell you what happened to my son a couple of years ago. He was given a 4 yr. AROTC scholarship to three schools including his #1 choice which was an Ivy. The ROO was notified about the scholarship and my son's interest in attending. ROO wrote an email and visited Dean of Admissions in person to advise them. My son got waitlisted and eventually rejected. (He had his scholarship transferred to a different school and has done great there). I know the Ivy ROO vouched for him because we saw a copy of the email reply from the Dean.
Anyway, his story is just one reference point. I wish the best for your child and good luck.
 

Oldsalt

5-Year Member
Each unit at each Ivy is very different.
Some have very close relationships with admissions while others don't, or choose not to.
I know of a couple of Ivy schools where the unit gets over 90% of its recommendations.
At some elite schools having support of the unit is similar to having help from a coach.
Do the coaches get all the folks they want? Nope, neither do the units.
You have to be competitive, in most cases ROTC alone won't get you in. Are you top 10% of your class? 34+? Multiple leadership roles? That is a given at these schools. You need that something extra: AA athlete, state award winner in something, first chair symphony, Eagle Scout, actor appearing in a national show are examples.
There are a couple other factors, but since those are out of anyone's control, they need not be mentioned.
Summary answer: ROTC can be a hook. In few instances, it is the hook you need. Most, you need something else.
OS
 

Day-Tripper

5-Year Member
it should help your admittance, let the admissions offices know you got it
It would be more accurate to say it "May help your admittance"
+1, As mentioned earlier, Ivys tend not to care if you have an outside scholarship. They don't need the money.
I'm certain (from inside sources) that Harvard University gives preference to veterans on the GI Bill. Would ROTC fall under the same umbrella? I honestly don't know.

But, as the say in Brooklyn, "it couldn't hoit"!
 

clarksonarmy

Recruiting Operations Officer at Clarkson Army
5-Year Member
Bottom line is it’s out of your control. Let admissions know you have the scholarship, touch base with the ROO to make sure they are pulling for you and then you have to hope for the best.
 

brob

Member
ALL schools like it when you are paying for the education. This can be Wala Wala College or Harvard. The source don’t matter your parent, Scholarships, etc. Any schools and even top wealthy schools will evaluate your qualification first. If you are a winner of national merit scholarship such as ROTC and other merit based scholarships, it is a sign and confirmation that you are highly competitive and diligent to apply to such programs. It shows your commitment and maturity. This also sets you apart from your parent sponsoring your education.

Bottom line, it adds to your character and quality. So yes having won a merit based scholarship such as ROTC is a positive reflection on your application to which ever schools you are applying to. It adds certainty that the student has all serious intent to pursue military service through their schools. Based on my recent interaction with admissions and accepted students currently enrolled in ROTC Program at some highly selective colleges, about 50% are admitted to their as ROTC Scholarship winner. This is a small sample size so don’t take this to the bank. But it is positive.

For all those merit based scholarship winners, great job!
Yes, and I would like to add, though, that getting into top notch schools isn't always all its cracked up to be. There are so many really fine institutions across the country where a student can make a great life and get a great education. In my opinion, scholarship winners would be wise to look at schools that offer free room and board. Many lesser-known schools offer this in order to attract high achieving students to their campuses. It was a great incentive for my DD - it means she has more money and freedom to travel and do study abroad trips that we wouldn't have been able to finance for her had we been paying private school tuition, fees, and room and board.
 
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