How to apply for a ADD/ADHD waiver

mom1234

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Mar 22, 2016
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Help! My son who is a senior in HS, just got his letter stating he is required to get an administrative AMI. for D231.90. He was diagnosed ADHD in 1st grade, been on same dosage of Adderall for all these years. Goes off meds, weekends and summers - uses it as needed. He is a 4.0 student, class leader, captain of his ski team - a really good student and person. He has never had an IEP or 504 (gifted classes in school-top of his class); No history of mental disorder; Goes off meds for weekends/summer; maintains a 4.0 GPA; Dr. would provide documentation. Where do we go from here?
 

MaggieMae66

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They way I understand the process, if the SA deems your DS competitive for the academy and wants him they will request the waiver on his behalf.
 

LineInTheSand

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He needs to be off the meds for a year, and can't take tests with time allowances.

Has that happened?
 

Cerberi

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Realistically - Plan B is the way to go

If you do the research, there is at minimum a time period between the last time drugs taken and it is longer than 99 days

During that time, the candidate needs to demonstrate no academic or social concerns while off the medication

It's a shame, you weren't made aware of this a long time ago

Line in the Sand beat me to the post
 

LineInTheSand

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In all honesty, I'm ADD (I refuse to add the H! Haha) I was on Ritalin since very early on, after a double-blind test. A year before I applied to CGA (and USNA, USMMA and NROTC scholarships) I went off of Ritalin. I don't think I took many untimed texts (and those may have been for Dyslexia) but after a year of distraction and moderately worse (but still good) grades, I got a waiver and reported to CGA.

I'm not sure I realized how difficult the transition was, but into my adult life, after getting out, I'm amazed at being able to read a book on a train again.


If you're ADD/ADHD (and I know plenty of people like to joke about it) you realize how constant distractions are. Being able to hear a conversation five tables away but unable to concentrate on the person sitting across the table from you is just a tiny sample. The kind of time management an academy requires only highlights that difficulty.... But you CAN do it... Just create some structure and understand your needs. Social media and the number of outlets today make it even harder.

Again, to be eligible for a waiver you have some boxes to check related to medication and test-taking.
 

AROTC-dad

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In all honesty, I'm ADD (I refuse to add the H! Haha) I was on Ritalin since very early on, after a double-blind test. A year before I applied to CGA (and USNA, USMMA and NROTC scholarships) I went off of Ritalin. I don't think I took many untimed texts (and those may have been for Dyslexia) but after a year of distraction and moderately worse (but still good) grades, I got a waiver and reported to CGA.

I'm not sure I realized how difficult the transition was, but into my adult life, after getting out, I'm amazed at being able to read a book on a train again.


If you're ADD/ADHD (and I know plenty of people like to joke about it) you realize how constant distractions are. Being able to hear a conversation five tables away but unable to concentrate on the person sitting across the table from you is just a tiny sample. The kind of time management an academy requires only highlights that difficulty.... But you CAN do it... Just create some structure and understand your needs. Social media and the number of outlets today make it even harder.

Again, to be eligible for a waiver you have some boxes to check related to medication and test-taking.

LITS, I'm also diagnosed with Adult ADD and uhh.....(squirrel).

Seriously, I am really impressed that you got through USCGA off meds. I was unable to finish college in my 20's. Went to work, started a family. In my 40's, I was finally diagnosed. I was on meds for a few years and then re-trained myself using tactics and systems to minimize distractions. Not an easy task! Studying for a masters and my CFP certification, even worse!

This website helped me acquire some additional tools for coping with the issues.
http://www.additudemag.com/adhd/article/2520.html
 

LineInTheSand

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LITS, I'm also diagnosed with Adult ADD and uhh.....(squirrel).

Seriously, I am really impressed that you got through USCGA off meds. I was unable to finish college in my 20's. Went to work, started a family. In my 40's, I was finally diagnosed. I was on meds for a few years and then re-trained myself using tactics and systems to minimize distractions. Not an easy task! Studying for a masters and my CFP certification, even worse!

This website helped me acquire some additional tools for coping with the issues.
http://www.additudemag.com/adhd/article/2520.html
Oh it's no fun. Thank goodness ADD folks are interested in plenty of things (to keep us busy). HAHAHA
 

afmom2020

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Feb 26, 2015
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In all honesty, I'm ADD (I refuse to add the H! Haha) I was on Ritalin since very early on, after a double-blind test. A year before I applied to CGA (and USNA, USMMA and NROTC scholarships) I went off of Ritalin. I don't think I took many untimed texts (and those may have been for Dyslexia) but after a year of distraction and moderately worse (but still good) grades, I got a waiver and reported to CGA.

I'm not sure I realized how difficult the transition was, but into my adult life, after getting out, I'm amazed at being able to read a book on a train again.


If you're ADD/ADHD (and I know plenty of people like to joke about it) you realize how constant distractions are. Being able to hear a conversation five tables away but unable to concentrate on the person sitting across the table from you is just a tiny sample. The kind of time management an academy requires only highlights that difficulty.... But you CAN do it... Just create some structure and understand your needs. Social media and the number of outlets today make it even harder.

Again, to be eligible for a waiver you have some boxes to check related to medication and test-taking.
One of my daughters has ADD. I can't imagine how hard academy life must have been. You have all my respect and admiration.
 

LineInTheSand

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Oh no, folks. Don't need any admiration or respect, but thanks! Just trying to illustrate that while it can be difficult, it's doable.

I think it takes a little self-imposed structure on top of the structure an academy already offers.
 

rotcmom3

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Aug 17, 2015
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I will share the story of my son. I researched this very carefully and would not have even applied for a scholarship if I did not think we could get cleared. And full disclaimer- if you need meds to function, by all means to it and choose a different career path. Happiness and success are important, and your health comes first. BUT- if you don't need meds, don't take them! Be a 3.5 kid instead of a 4.0 kid. My son was diagnosed in grade school, and used drug off an on. He used them even less in middle school, and not in high school. When he first wanted to apply for
ROTC scholarship, I researched the DODMERB criteria carefully. You must fill the following criteria- No IEP or accommodations since age 14. No co morbidities. No cumulative use , Or PRESCRIPTION of meds more than 24 months over the age of 14. No meds in last 12 months. Able to maintain GPA off meds. Able to pass service specific testing. Documentation from original provider stating drugs not needed. So- beginning about 6 months before the ROTC boards, I started by taking my son back to the original provider so it all this could be documented. My son is a 3 year winner. As soon as we heard he was a winner, I called the provider back and asked him to write a memo. I took this memo to his medical exam. I also had my son repeat these criteria on his medical form. Basically, we did our own remedial! We got word two weeks ago that he is medically cleared! We wrote on the medical form all these things, and that he met the medical accession criteria for DoDMERB. I am thankful to this forum and Pima and ClarksonArmy for their assistance and suggestions and I was wise enough to do my homework. Also, this is one area NOT to leave to your DD or DS. You have to be involved to make it happen. I hope this can help others. I lost a lot of sleep until we got that clearance!
 

LineInTheSand

USCGA 2006
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I will share the story of my son. I researched this very carefully and would not have even applied for a scholarship if I did not think we could get cleared. And full disclaimer- if you need meds to function, by all means to it and choose a different career path. Happiness and success are important, and your health comes first. BUT- if you don't need meds, don't take them! Be a 3.5 kid instead of a 4.0 kid. My son was diagnosed in grade school, and used drug off an on. He used them even less in middle school, and not in high school. When he first wanted to apply for
ROTC scholarship, I researched the DODMERB criteria carefully. You must fill the following criteria- No IEP or accommodations since age 14. No co morbidities. No cumulative use , Or PRESCRIPTION of meds more than 24 months over the age of 14. No meds in last 12 months. Able to maintain GPA off meds. Able to pass service specific testing. Documentation from original provider stating drugs not needed. So- beginning about 6 months before the ROTC boards, I started by taking my son back to the original provider so it all this could be documented. My son is a 3 year winner. As soon as we heard he was a winner, I called the provider back and asked him to write a memo. I took this memo to his medical exam. I also had my son repeat these criteria on his medical form. Basically, we did our own remedial! We got word two weeks ago that he is medically cleared! We wrote on the medical form all these things, and that he met the medical accession criteria for DoDMERB. I am thankful to this forum and Pima and ClarksonArmy for their assistance and suggestions and I was wise enough to do my homework. Also, this is one area NOT to leave to your DD or DS. You have to be involved to make it happen. I hope this can help others. I lost a lot of sleep until we got that clearance!
I think what your highlighting here is how to clear DODMERB. There are also criterial (closer to the date you may apply) that covers areas eligible for a DODMERB waiver (what I had to receive to get in).
 

rotcmom3

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Aug 17, 2015
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I think what your highlighting here is how to clear DODMERB. There are also criterial (closer to the date you may apply) that covers areas eligible for a DODMERB waiver (what I had to receive to get in).
Hmmm. I believe we are talking about the same thing. You need AMI. Same a remedial, right? So, you have to have to be able to satisfactorily answer those questions to get clearance from DoDMERB. If we had been asked for AMI, I would have approached the original provider and explained our situation and asked him to submit records and write a memo. I believe you can use your own provider for remedials, but you have to pay for them. Only difference with us, is that based on advice from this forum, I pre empted the AMI by providing the material up front- before they even had a chance to ask for it. Good luck to you and your son.
 

stkgator

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Apr 5, 2016
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The DoDI 6130.03 dated 09/13/2001 states the following for ADHD - see a.3 highlighted below:


a. Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) (314) UNLESS the following criteria are met:

(1) The applicant has not required an Individualized Education Program or work accommodations since the age of 14.

(2) There is no history of comorbid mental disorders.

(3) The applicant has never taken more than a single daily dosage of medication or has not been prescribed medication for this condition for more than 24 cumulative months after the age of 14.

(4) During periods off of medication after the age of 14, the applicant has been able to maintain at least a 2.0 grade point average without accommodations.

(5) Documentation from the applicant’s prescribing provider that continued medication is not required for acceptable occupational or work performance.

(6) Applicant is required to enter service and pass Service-specific training periods with no prescribed medication for ADHD.
 

kaydeeloo

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Jan 5, 2017
Messages
54
@rotcmom3 or anyone else that can help. My son got a 3 year award, has only taken meds a few times, for standardized tests. And he did get extra time on the ACT. Ughhh. He had an IEP set up at his school his junior year, but he never used services one time. I canceled it at the beginning of his senior year. Does he have any chance of getting a waiver?
 
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