The Gunsmith Thread

flieger83

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Given there is ample evidence of modern-era boneheadedness when it comes to mistakes with weapons, what would be equivalent boneheaded errors in Natty Bumppo’s time, with firearms of that era? Presumably equivalent mistakes could be made, likely with more fatal outcomes.

Remember my DH says my mind is like a lint trap, all kinds of stuff gets stuck in there.
I remember at Antietam the guide showed a picture of a federal .69 caliber musket they unearthed. It had either four or five rounds in the barrel.

I'm thinking someone was a tad....rushed? Or nervous?

Steve
 

Physicsguru

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Of course, there were stories of muskets being loaded and fired without taking the ramrod out first. People, without proper and repetitive training, will do the craziest things.
 

Capt MJ

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Of course, there were stories of muskets being loaded and fired without taking the ramrod out first. People, without proper and repetitive training, will do the craziest things.
And the rest of the story? Does the ramrod get propelled anywhere? Does something bad happen to body parts near certain points in the musket? My musketry and early rifle knowledge comes from Bernard Cornwell’s books, courtesy of Richard Sharpe.
 

brewmeist

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Double charges would probably be the worst thing to happen back then, especially with the Damascus barrels. If a second ball was also put down...Forget about it... I personally mark all of my ramrods to be sure I do not over-charge, and that's with modern steel, but that's not in a battle situation. I've seen a barrel explode. Shooter was very lucky.

Of course paper cartridges helped with proper charges once they came along.
 
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THParent

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...I personally mark all of my ramrods to be sure I do not over-charge...
That's very prudent. I teach this to new students of muzzle-loading. I only mark the unloaded position, for verification that the barrel is empty. If you always use the same charge, I can see the merits of an additional loaded mark, though.
 

brewmeist

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That's very prudent. I teach this to new students of muzzle-loading. I only mark the unloaded position, for verification that the barrel is empty. If you always use the same charge, I can see the merits of an additional loaded mark, though.
I actually have different loads for my 'real' muzzleloaders...my flintlocks and caplocks. I hunt and shoot competitively with some of the same rifles. No need to throw a 390 gr maxi ball in front of 90 gr of black powder towards a piece of paper when I can do the same with half the lead and half the powder. Fortunately I get the same point of impact at set ranges. I have different lines for different loads.
 

NJROTC-CC

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the
WOW...almost hard to tell they're the same part.
I know! I had to look at one of my other Super X Models 1’s to re-assure myself that they sent me the correct part. They did.

DS liked shooting clays. I am going to bring two of his friends, both of whom just graduated H.S. and are reporting to Paris Island in August, to shoot clays with us before they go.
 

THParent

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Good for you. That is nice. Have a good time!
 

flieger83

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the


I know! I had to look at one of my other Super X Models 1’s to re-assure myself that they sent me the correct part. They did.

DS liked shooting clays. I am going to bring two of his friends, both of whom just graduated H.S. and are reporting to Paris Island in August, to shoot clays with us before they go.
I've been a marksman for over 40 years (trained by my grandfather, a US army "sniper/marksman" in the Pacific in WWII...
(I heard more stories about the Springfield '03...)

And I fired my first shotgun about four years ago.

I'm going to have to try clays someday...they seem...enticing!

Steve
 

Skipper07

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I'm going to have to try clays someday...they seem...enticing!
I’ve been casually shooting rifles and handguns for a few years now. I’m proficient enough to qualify E in pistol and S in rifle. Clearly I’m not great, but I enjoy time spent shooting with family in friends. I fired my first shotgun a couple months ago while shooting trap with some friends and immediately started filing the paperwork to buy a gun in my commie state. I’m hooked.
 

THParent

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Okay, the guy picked up his three AR-15 uppers yesterday and (at my request) left me one of the fubarred barrel nuts.
This is a new barrel nut and an LMT wrench made specifically for it:

1596203951542.png

And this is one of the barrel nuts that he mangled:

1596204022326.png1596204051785.png

People are really special.
 

Old Navy BGO

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I'm going to have to try clays someday...they seem...enticing!
Yes, but no matter how you cook them, they taste like cr@p! :)

Seriously, Sporting Clays is a great game ! We never had guns in the house when I was growing up, but late in his business career, Dad got invited to go Goose Hunting on the Eastern Shore of Maryland about the time I was in Maine and took up grouse hunting. That kind of ignited a passion, and we spent alot of good years together shooting sporting clays. It was a great father /son activity, especially as he got older -- he had the skill and technique (he shot 3x a week when he retired), and I had quickness and more natural instinct. I tried to get out with him at least once a month, and the competition was epic., and always followed by a post-shoot beer. Dad passed away several years ago now, and while I try to go out every once in awhile, its just not the same.
 

AF6872

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WOW. Natty Bumppo. It's like saying "Who is John Gault". How many knew that reference. I grew up on those books and still have the full series in the bookcase. Have been to the Glimmerglass. Walked some of those woods while kids had Hockey Camp at Lake Placid.
 

Capt MJ

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WOW. Natty Bumppo. It's like saying "Who is John Gault". How many knew that reference. I grew up on those books and still have the full series in the bookcase. Have been to the Glimmerglass. Walked some of those woods while kids had Hockey Camp at Lake Placid.
Nothing like an obscure reference to catch someone’s attention. I read all those books as a young teen. My mother’s family for several years had a cabin on Saranac Lake. The book case was stocked with early American literature, courtesy of my very literate aunt. One of my best summer kid memories, sitting on the dock, reading, feeling the sun warm on my back but lake water cold on my dangling feet.
 
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