Happy Star of the West Day

CitadelN88

Banned
Where in we celebrate Citadel Cadets firing in the Federal steamer Star of the West while it was attempting to resupply the Federal garrison at Ft Sumter.

The Star of the West was unhit in this action but chose to turn around. For this action the Citadel was awarded on nine battle streamers still carried on the Regimental Colors to this day.


1. Confederate States Army .
2. Star of the West, January 9, 1861.
3. Wappoo Cut, November 1861.
4. James Island, June 1862.
5. Charleston and Vicinity, July-October 1863.
6. James Island, June 1864.
7. Tulifinny, December 1864.
8. James Island, December 1864-February 1865.
9. Williamston, May 1865.
 

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AROTC-dad

Moderator
5-Year Member
MOD NOTE:
There is nothing wrong about discussing historical events in the off-topic forum so long as members are respectful to one another in conversation.
 

Jcleppe

5-Year Member
The Star of the West was indeed hit, twice, not enough to sink her.

I'm surprised they received a Battle Streamer since they had fired on an unarmed civilian ship before any war had been declared. I'm not sure it's referred to as a struggle as much as it is a Civil War.

A history lesson for sure....a celebration?, not so sure.
 

fencersmother

10-Year Member
Founding Member
Hm... here we go.

In some parts of Alabama, what northerners call "The Civil War" is still taught as the "War of Northern Aggression."

And, for many people, it wasn't a war about "slavery", but a war about states' rights.

After all these years, people can still fight/argue about that time period.
 

NavyHoops

Super Moderator
5-Year Member
Folks, let’s keep this civil. There is zero need to personally attack anyone. I get there are strong opinions on this subject... and that is fine, but let’s all behave ourselves or this thread or it will be locked very quickly.
 
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CitadelN88

Banned
The there was the Battle at Tulifinny where Citadel and Arsenal cadets

“The engagement at Tulifinny Creek is of historic importance because it involved the deployment of the entire Battalion of State Cadets from the Citadel and Arsenal Academies as an independent military unit engaged in armed combat with Union forces.

In December of 1864, the Governor of South Carolina ordered the Battalion of State Cadets from the Citadel and Arsenal to deploy to Tulifinny Creek south of Charleston to reinforce Confederate troops defending a key railroad bridge against a much larger advancing Union force.

On December 7, the Battalion of State Cadets, along with Confederate militia units from North and South Carolina and Georgia, engaged a much larger Union force in pitched battle for several hours, advancing against rifle and cannon fire and forcing the federal troops back to their entrenchments. On December 9, the battalion of cadets successfully repulsed a Union counter-attack on their defensive position by the railroad trestle with their disciplined rifle fire.

The Battalion of State Cadets suffered eight casualties in the engagement, including one killed, and were commended by Major General Samuel Jones, CSA, Commanding General of South Carolina and Georgia Departments, for their gallantry under fire.
A mural depicting the December 9th engagement at the Tulifinny Creek railroad trestle is on display in the Daniel Library.”
 

flieger83

Super Moderator
10-Year Member
NavyHoops said it well and I'll just say this: if you're going to debate/discuss this topic, that's fine, but inflammatory rhetoric is unnecessary.

I saw the statement using the word "traitors..." Okay...let's look at history. Prior to the Civil War, the citizens of the states referred to their country as their home states. That's why many state banks issued money (the first paper money too; the USA didn't issue that until the civil war and the back of the note was green, hence the term: greenback), US coins weren't the only legal tender until around 1857. If you had a store prior to that, you might have British money, Mexican money, etc...etc...and would be required to take/exchange that way. In addition, there was no "allegiance" deemed necessary to a federal state. When asked, citizens didn't say "I'm an American" they would say "I'm a Virginian, I'm an Ohioan, New Yorker, etc."

One of the benefits of that horrible period was the development, out of necessity, of a national identity and a sense of belonging to a nation bigger than your state. Think about; when a Union Colonel was offered command of ALL the US Army, he turned it down. He didn't turn it down because he'd be stepping ahead of all those other more senior officers; rather, he turned it down saying "I can not raise my sword against my country, Virginia." That gent was Colonel Robert E. Lee.

It was a very divisive time and still harbors strong feelings in people to this day, 153 years after it ended.

Steve
 

Nemo567

Member
the citizens of the states referred to their country as their home states.
I'm sorry, but this just isn't true. Those that resigned from the United States Army/Navy/ect.. recognized that they were turning against their country. They are by definition traitors. It's a shame that some in this country feel the need to glorify and memorialize them.

There are lots of examples of Southerners that stayed loyal to the United States and fought against the Confederacy. Infact around 40% of Virginians in the Army stayed in the Army instead of joining the Confederacy.
 

Tbpxece

Member
Do you have a source for that?
https://opinionator.blogs.nytimes.com/2011/04/19/the-general-in-his-study/

"forty percent of Virginian officers would remain with the Union forces."
Thanks, interesting read. However, that claim is unsubstantiated even in that blog post. Have you happened to see an actual verifiable source (non-opinion or news piece) for that statistic? I have looked and have not.

It would be interesting to know what percentage of KY, MD, DE, and WV officers switched to the Confederacy.
 
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Nemo567

Member
Thanks, interesting read. However, that claim is unsubstantiated even in that blog post. Have you happened to see an actual verifiable source (non-opinion or news piece) for that statistic? I have looked and have not.
This is SAF not a Civil War history course. I gave you a source, if you disagree with it find a source that shows differently.

Many officers from Southern states stayed. Every southern state besides SC raised at least a Battalion to fight for the North.
 

Tbpxece

Member
I gave you a source
Nah, you gave me a link to an opinion piece in a left-leaning newspaper with an unsubstantiated claim. And then followed that up with another unsubstantiated claim.

if you disagree with it find a source that shows differently.
No thanks, not interested in a fight with you-- I was more curious whether or not that 40% statement was accurate (or at least verifiable) as it would be an interesting point to use when arguing with the Lost Cause crowd.

Sucks that it isn't.

This is SAF not a Civil War history course.


Come on, be nice, man. It will get you further in your career. :)
 
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