Is this fine? Dropping science class for another class in high school

rayrotc

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Joined
Apr 22, 2018
Messages
279
I am currently applying for the 4 year Army ROTC scholarship and the 2 year Army Early Commissioning ROTC scholarship.

Would it be fine if I drop my science class this year?

I have already taken Physics, Chemistry, Biology

I am currently enrolled in Anatomy Honors but I don't think I'm keeping up well and I am planning to switch to a class called American Politics Honors. (We don't have grades in yet and I also lost interest in Anatomy, plus it's not a requirement)

Is that fine? Is there much difference?

My schedule is fairly tough this year too. I have gym, anatomy honors (drop), AP Comp Gov, AP Psych, Calculus Honors, AP literature, and Stat Honors

Prompt feedback would be great!
 

Jcleppe

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Feb 10, 2010
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6,769
If you want to switch, switch, it's not going to hurt you, the transcripts you send in are for grades 9, 10, and 11.

Just a heads up, if you apply now to both the National Scholarship and the ECP Scholarship, just realize that if you are awarded the ECP you will not be looked at for the National Scholarship after the award, even if you turn it down. Chances are you will get the ECP early. Make sure ECP is what you want and what that could mean in regards to Active Duty down the road.
 

rayrotc

Member
Joined
Apr 22, 2018
Messages
279
Thank you!
If you want to switch, switch, it's not going to hurt you, the transcripts you send in are for grades 9, 10, and 11.

Just a heads up, if you apply now to both the National Scholarship and the ECP Scholarship, just realize that if you are awarded the ECP you will not be looked at for the National Scholarship after the award, even if you turn it down. Chances are you will get the ECP early. Make sure ECP is what you want and what that could mean in regards to Active Duty down the road.
Thank you!
 

brob

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Joined
Apr 1, 2017
Messages
207
I don't think dropping Anatomy will hurt your scholarship chances. What might be more important is your intended major in college. If you are looking at anything in health sciences, you will want to stick with Anatomy, but maybe you can drop to regular level course, not Honors?
 

CrewDad

Member
Joined
Jan 7, 2018
Messages
676
I am currently applying for the 4 year Army ROTC scholarship and the 2 year Army Early Commissioning ROTC scholarship.

Would it be fine if I drop my science class this year?

I have already taken Physics, Chemistry, Biology

I am currently enrolled in Anatomy Honors but I don't think I'm keeping up well and I am planning to switch to a class called American Politics Honors. (We don't have grades in yet and I also lost interest in Anatomy, plus it's not a requirement)

Is that fine? Is there much difference?

My schedule is fairly tough this year too. I have gym, anatomy honors (drop), AP Comp Gov, AP Psych, Calculus Honors, AP literature, and Stat Honors

Prompt feedback would be great!

Drop Anatomy. You don’t need it and it’s not considered a core science class. My son took it in his Senior Year. He loved it. Everyone’s different. Again dropping Anatomy will not make a difference. Enjoy the classes you’re taking senior year. They’re all solid classes.

Also be careful with early Commissioning. You may not be given priority to active duty. But can enroll in national guard as you finish out your 2 years at a 4 year college for your Bachelors. Early Commissioning is conditional upon completing 4 year Bachelor’s degree. My son looked into this and decided against applying to early Commissioning because there were few conditions he didn’t like. Both in Commissioning and Scholarship. You might end up with only 2 year scholarship if you put early Commissioning as your first choice. We liked and looked into Valley Forge. Good luck with scholarships and college Apps.
 

thibaud

Member
Joined
Sep 28, 2017
Messages
319
Another vote for dropping Anatomy.

Not a core class. Not likely that a college would assign much value to it, either value for admissions committee's decision or value in terms of granting college credit.
 
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