NROTC HS Class of 2022 questions

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Jan 9, 2021
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Hi, I am currently a junior in high school and had a few questions to people who have received nrotc scholarships in the past.

1. When should I first reach out to my recruiter?
2. Is there a benefit to applying earlier, let’s say in the summer, vs in the winter?
3. How do you coordinate applying for the scholarship and the school?

Here is a little background about me...
I am a 4.0 student with many AP classes. I am guessing I’m around top 20 in my class of about 300 students. I have a 1360 on my SAT and yet to take my ACT. I have 2 jobs and many volunteer hours. I am apart of a lot of clubs and honor societies as well. I am already a 4x varsity swimmer, being named captain this junior year. And 1x varsity XC and track. I don’t have too many leadership roles but I know my recommendation letters will show leadership. I know you can’t tell me if I will get it or not but do I have a decent chance? I plan on going to college for Computer Engineering and would go to OCS anyway if I didn’t get the scholarship. If you read this far thank you for your time and can’t wait for your input
 

smith011

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Sep 24, 2020
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Hey I just went through the process this year so it's still pretty fresh on my mind. You seem to be pretty competitive for the scholarship just stats wise. I am not super familiar with the tier system for Naval cadets since I went the Marine option route.
1. As early as possible, now is a great time to get in contact with them and maybe even go to weekly PT with the local recruits, it really helped me to constantly be around others who were just as passionate as I am to join the military and I also go to have conversations with several non-recruiter NCOs so it was definitely helpful for getting a better feel for the military if you aren't already familiar with it. I strongly recommend going.
2. Yes there is. Definitely get your application done this summer so that it can go before the early boards, that way if you don't get awarded the scholarship you will get a second chance and have time to improve your PFT score and such before the second board meets. (These are the MO boards, the Naval boards may operate differently)
3. You'll list your top 5 schools on the online NETFOCUS application, make sure you're OK with going to any of the schools and that they have an NROTC unit, if you get the scholarship you'll most likely be placed in your #1 slot but there's a chance the unit is full and it will go to one of the other four schools on your list. Apply to colleges the same as everyone else, the scholarship is independent of your acceptance to the schools.
Hope this helps
 

kinnem

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Agree with above but don't forget quality. Submit as early as possible while making sure it's the best application possible. More scholarships are awarded by the later boards than the early boards.
 

justdoit19

Proud parent of an ANG, USNA X2, and a MidSib
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4,324
Agree with above. There are threads here, with recipients posting when they were awarded scholarships. You can look at those for dates and when awards were issued. Both of my guys had their complete apps/interviews/cfa’s done for the first boards. And both received scholarships 1st board. Summers are the perfect time, as you HAVE the time. And there is time to work through the hurdles that will probably present themselves during the process (my sons were dealing with changes in who their recruiters are, and related loss of stuff already done. It happens!).

One pice of advice I can offer that I think was super helpful, was making sure to touch base with your high school counselor, and teachers that will be evaluating you. If they aren’t familiar with the process, have a convo with them about what they will be asked to do. And inquire of them best way to be in touch with them over the summer months. More than likely they will be on summer break. Do they check their school email? Would they prefer a private email? Those kinds of things. Hopefully you are a person they want to help with this. But touching base before school is over is a good idea, imo.

Good luck to you! Exciting stuff!!
 
Joined
Jan 9, 2021
Messages
14
Hey I just went through the process this year so it's still pretty fresh on my mind. You seem to be pretty competitive for the scholarship just stats wise. I am not super familiar with the tier system for Naval cadets since I went the Marine option route.
1. As early as possible, now is a great time to get in contact with them and maybe even go to weekly PT with the local recruits, it really helped me to constantly be around others who were just as passionate as I am to join the military and I also go to have conversations with several non-recruiter NCOs so it was definitely helpful for getting a better feel for the military if you aren't already familiar with it. I strongly recommend going.
2. Yes there is. Definitely get your application done this summer so that it can go before the early boards, that way if you don't get awarded the scholarship you will get a second chance and have time to improve your PFT score and such before the second board meets. (These are the MO boards, the Naval boards may operate differently)
3. You'll list your top 5 schools on the online NETFOCUS application, make sure you're OK with going to any of the schools and that they have an NROTC unit, if you get the scholarship you'll most likely be placed in your #1 slot but there's a chance the unit is full and it will go to one of the other four schools on your list. Apply to colleges the same as everyone else, the scholarship is independent of your acceptance to the schools.
Hope this helps
How important would you say the PRT is for the scholarship. I looked at the chart but I don’t really understand how the score works and what is considered good. BTW, thank you for the great response!
 

smith011

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Sep 24, 2020
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I only have experience with the PFT, and looking at the PRT chart it looks like the score is by category and not numerically but I could be mistaken.
So in order to max out a PRT you would need to:
run an 8:15 for the 1.5 miles
complete 109 curl ups in under 2 minutes
complete 92 push-ups in under 2 minutes
That's a perfect score, the average score in the area I live this year for applicants was 278/300 for the MO that has slightly different components of the test.
This is a section of the application that you have the a lot of direct control over, so preparing well will help a lot. You can't really change your GPA or test scores and you don't have any control over what the counselor evaluation says, but you can train for the PRT/PFT.
Getting a good score won't win the scholarship on it's own but alongside a decent/ competitive application it will help a lot.
 

unkown1961

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Oct 20, 2016
Messages
852
You have good advice above. All I can add is that I had three kids successfully go through the process (including one with an ISR) and each completed the app in early summer, then a recruiter reached out to them. I don't believe you need to reach out to one before you do the app.
As for fitness, given your sports, you'll ace it easily. My kids did a little less in sports and were fine in the test. And they didn't work out with any local recruits, just on their own.
You sound like a great candidate, but don't stress with the worry. Do your best on the apps, get your LORs set up early, and set up the fitness test proctoring early as well.
Good luck!
 
Joined
Jan 9, 2021
Messages
14
You have good advice above. All I can add is that I had three kids successfully go through the process (including one with an ISR) and each completed the app in early summer, then a recruiter reached out to them. I don't believe you need to reach out to one before you do the app.
As for fitness, given your sports, you'll ace it easily. My kids did a little less in sports and were fine in the test. And they didn't work out with any local recruits, just on their own.
You sound like a great candidate, but don't stress with the worry. Do your best on the apps, get your LORs set up early, and set up the fitness test proctoring early as well.
Good luck!
Thank you and I agree, this is some of the best advice I have received. Just one quick question. How did you get all of your son's questions answered about the program without reaching out to the recruiter. Is there someone that can better answer my questions than a recruiter?
 

unkown1961

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Oct 20, 2016
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852
Thank you and I agree, this is some of the best advice I have received. Just one quick question. How did you get all of your son's questions answered about the program without reaching out to the recruiter. Is there someone that can better answer my questions than a recruiter?
They did the have many questions to be honest. But once they got their name on the system then the local recruiter reached out to them.
 

Go Dores!

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Sep 11, 2018
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@Andrewdolinsky - To clear up some terminology in this post....

For the NROTC Scholarship application, you will be taking the Applicant Fitness Assessment (AFA), not the PRT. The PRT is part of the USN's Physical Fitness Assessment (PFA), which you will start taking once you join an NROTC program and then throughout your USN career.

Instructions for AFA and max scores for the three categories can be found here:

As @unkown1961 points out, once you start the application process (your window won't likely open until 1 April 2021), a recruiter (or scholarship coordinator as some of them call themselves) will reach out to you. If you are interested in reaching out to your geographically appropriate Navy Recruiting District to ask questions about the NROTC program, use this link (and click Navy Map):

Keep in mind that the recruiters are likely busy helping applicants complete their application for this years cycle and you might not hear back right away.
 
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Andrewdolinsky, no interest in the USNA?
I went through a little phase where I wanted to go to USNA but I really want to be able to enjoy college life (NROTC edition). I want to still have some freedom in college because once in the Navy, I won't have much of it. I am considering applying for NASS just to experience it to see if it changes my mind. Assuming that is a good idea?
 
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Jan 9, 2021
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Quick Question: (This might just be my OCD)

When the application opens for me on April 1st, am I able to start adding things. And will it save for the future when i need to keep adding more things. Or is it just you get everything and you do the application at once?
 

tweety_bird

USNA 2025
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Apr 12, 2020
Messages
110
I filled out the application this year, and there were save buttons so I could come back to it later.
 

justdoit19

Proud parent of an ANG, USNA X2, and a MidSib
Joined
Apr 9, 2017
Messages
4,324
Quick Question: (This might just be my OCD)

When the application opens for me on April 1st, am I able to start adding things. And will it save for the future when i need to keep adding more things. Or is it just you get everything and you do the application at once?
NASS will give you a bit of a peek into life as a student. But a better look, would be a candidate visit. Which is shadowing a Mid during the academic year. NASS is during the summer, no school in session. If your emphasis is in the academic/school element, I would suggest a candidate visit.

Of course you can try both!! But one over the other, from your post, I would emphasize the CVW, where you will get a better look at the life of a Mid in the chill year.

Our local State U also had a ‘shadow a Mid’ type program. That could be an option for a look into NROTC. Additionally, all 3 of my ROTC applicants met with the local unit at their 1st choice college and as part of that, had a Q&A. Those visits were the most informative of any in their processes (and also it put names with faces. Never a bad thing!). They did it as part of their summer admissions visits at the school.
 

airborne1030

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Joined
Mar 9, 2020
Messages
100
Hi, I am currently a junior in high school and had a few questions to people who have received nrotc scholarships in the past.

1. When should I first reach out to my recruiter?
2. Is there a benefit to applying earlier, let’s say in the summer, vs in the winter?
3. How do you coordinate applying for the scholarship and the school?

Here is a little background about me...
I am a 4.0 student with many AP classes. I am guessing I’m around top 20 in my class of about 300 students. I have a 1360 on my SAT and yet to take my ACT. I have 2 jobs and many volunteer hours. I am apart of a lot of clubs and honor societies as well. I am already a 4x varsity swimmer, being named captain this junior year. And 1x varsity XC and track. I don’t have too many leadership roles but I know my recommendation letters will show leadership. I know you can’t tell me if I will get it or not but do I have a decent chance? I plan on going to college for Computer Engineering and would go to OCS anyway if I didn’t get the scholarship. If you read this far thank you for your time and can’t wait for your input
My DD was awarded an NROTC - Marine Option scholarship. I can tell you that you should contact a recruiter as soon as possible.

The application usually doesn't open until April; however, the process is similar to a Service Academy application. It is thorough. Successful applicants often submit teacher letters of recommendation. I think the Navy and USMC do a very good job by having recruiters walk the scholarship applicants through the process. However, it is important that you follow up with your recruiter and stay in contact with your recruiter throughout the process.

Plus, if you opt to go the Marine Corps Option, you will take an Initial Strength Test (IST) and a Physical Fitness Test (PFT). Possibly an additional PFT if you do not score 1st Class on the test. My DD also applied to the USNA and USCGA, and I have to say the NROTC - Marine Option application process was very comprehensive and just as thorough.

NROTC is similar to AFROTC in that they tend to award scholarships to technical degrees. Whereas, NROTC - Marine Option winners can major in the degree of their choice, as long as it is approved by their Marine Officer Instructor.
 
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These responses have been so helpful. I might as well ask some of the questions that I still have.

How does it work with getting my masters through NRTOC. I want to major in computer engineering, but not sure when I will have the time to get my masters. Also, how does things like the Naval Postgraduate School work, is it free or is it that we just get paid while being there? I hope someone would be able to clarify for me.
 

Capt MJ

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These responses have been so helpful. I might as well ask some of the questions that I still have.

How does it work with getting my masters through NRTOC. I want to major in computer engineering, but not sure when I will have the time to get my masters. Also, how does things like the Naval Postgraduate School work, is it free or is it that we just get paid while being there? I hope someone would be able to clarify for me.
There are dozens of threads about post-grad degrees here on SAF.

Most Navy officers are expected to and will have obtained a Master’s in an approved field of study by the time they go up for the O-5 promotion board.

Quick summary.

- Directly out of USNA and NROTC, a truly tiny relative handful of new ensigns are allowed to go directly to medical school or other grad school. Tiny. They are elite academic students. This is not the usual sequence. USNA and NROTC are expected to produce officers ready to go to work in the Fleet or Corps.

- After the first sea/operational tours, there are opportunities to attend the Naval Postgraduate School or other grad school on the Navy’s dime and time. You are on “duty under instruction,” DUINS, full-time PCS orders.

- You can also use Tuition Assistance (funding) while assigned to a regular tour of duty to get your Master’s remotely or after-hours at an on-base classroom with an extension of a university, or at a local campus.

- There are also Master’s degree programs at the Naval War College and other Navy or joint service campuses such as National Defense University, or do an exchange tour at Army War College or other services’ schools. These are PCS and DUINS.

- In general, any school where you earn a degree using the Navy’s dime and time, or just dime, you will incur “payback” obligated service. The key is whether the payback is consecutive to or concurrent with any other periods of obligated service.

If you use your own dime and time, you owe no payback.

You will be able to research all of this yourself as you get more familiar with Navy program instructions. There will be opportunities to request NPS as part of the duty preference process, your seniors will talk to you about career progression, and your warfare community career path flow chart will show the windows for it.

As I noted, each officer community has its own web pages. Here’s the one for Surface Warfare. It won’t make much sense to you now, but it is chock full of career info.

And:
https://www.navy.com/sites/default/files/2018-03/gof-financial-brochure_0.pdf
 
Last edited:

123456

Member
Joined
Oct 24, 2020
Messages
21
These responses have been so helpful. I might as well ask some of the questions that I still have.

How does it work with getting my masters through NRTOC. I want to major in computer engineering, but not sure when I will have the time to get my masters. Also, how does things like the Naval Postgraduate School work, is it free or is it that we just get paid while being there? I hope someone would be able to clarify for me.
NPS is an assignment - meaning you'll relocate and your job is to go to school. You continue to be paid, and will owe the USN/USMC time before you can separate (3 years for the first 12 months, month for month thereafter - some degrees take longer than others). There are other graduate degree opportunities at various war colleges, but not for engineering. NPS is a possible second tour assignment, but more typically third tour or later.

I went to university with NROTC and knew a college programmer who earned a 3 year scholarship. She took a leave of absence one semester and was able to graduate with her master's degree before commissioning (she had get approval of her request). Only trick was to ensure that her bachelor's degree did not get awarded until the semester as the master's.
 

Miami Redskin

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Joined
Aug 9, 2019
Messages
57
There are dozens of threads about post-grad degrees here on SAF.

Most Navy officers are expected to and will have obtained a Master’s in an approved field of study by the time they go up for the O-5 promotion board.

Quick summary.

- Directly out of USNA and NROTC, a truly tiny relative handful of new ensigns are allowed to go directly to medical school or other grad school. Tiny. They are elite academic students. This is not the usual sequence. USNA and NROTC are expected to produce officers ready to go to work in the Fleet or Corps.

- After the first sea/operational tours, there are opportunities to attend the Naval Postgraduate School or other grad school on the Navy’s dime and time. You are on “duty under instruction,” DUINS, full-time PCS orders.

- You can also use Tuition Assistance (funding) while assigned to a regular tour of duty to get your Master’s remotely or after-hours at an on-base classroom with an extension of a university, or at a local campus.

- There are also Master’s degree programs at the Naval War College and other Navy or joint service campuses such as National Defense University, or do an exchange tour at Army War College or other services’ schools. These are PCS and DUINS.

- In general, any school where you earn a degree using the Navy’s dime and time, or just dime, you will incur “payback” obligated service. The key is whether the payback is consecutive to or concurrent with any other periods of obligated service.

If you use your own dime and time, you owe no payback.

You will be able to research all of this yourself as you get more familiar with Navy program instructions. There will be opportunities to request NPS as part of the duty preference process, your seniors will talk to you about career progression, and your warfare community career path flow chart will show the windows for it.

As I noted, each officer community has its own web pages. Here’s the one for Surface Warfare. It won’t make much sense to you now, but it is chock full of career info.

And:
https://www.navy.com/sites/default/files/2018-03/gof-financial-brochure_0.pdf
Wow. Clicking that SWO link is like going down a rabbit hole. It’s another language altogether.
 
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