NROTC Navy Option Notified

Discussion in 'ROTC' started by JGreenberg1191, Apr 2, 2017.

  1. JGreenberg1191

    JGreenberg1191 IAmNumber 1191

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    I just checked the portal this morning, and I was not awarded the scholarship. I was rather surprised considering my credentials:
    700 SAT equivalents on both sections, 3.9 GPA, 3 AP classes (all other classes were honors), very impressive results on my AFA, and I was admitted into both my #1 and #2 schools, varsity athlete in cross country, indoor and outdoor track, raised over $10k over my 4 years in HS for children's cancer research. I thought my interview with the officer went very well, not to mention I received a nomination to USNA from my congressman.

    I think it was my major that killed me. I picked political science for my major (tier 3) and I didn't submit my application until October. I understand that only 15% of awarded scholarships go to tier 3 majors, but I certainly thought I was competitive enough.

    So my questions are: what could have gone wrong? I knew my chances of getting into USNA were a long shot, but I thought I had a very good chance of getting the scholarship.
    Should I go to my #1 school and try to get the scholarship via college programmer? If I didn't get it this time, that means there is no guarantee I'll get it next time, and to be honest, the price tag of my #1 school is a little steep. My #2 school is cheaper, but their NROTC program is not quite at the same caliber as my #1.
    Is it even worth trying again at this point? I don't mean this as serving isn't worth it. My point is that if someone who is not pursuing a STEM major wants to be an officer, is this route the way to go, or would it be better for me to enlist, go to OCS, etc.

    I apologize if I am rambling a bit. I'm a little emotional right now.
    Thank you for any help or insight you can provide me
     
  2. beepybeetle

    beepybeetle H. pulchella

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    Well how do the financial aid offers stack up? NROTC scholarships are like competitive college admissions: Lots of well qualified applicants just fall through the gaps and disappear. Joining as a college programmer and getting a national scholarship that way is certainly a good alternative. I would think that going the CP route and reapplying is well worth the time. Take the day to sulk and feel sorry for yourself, then reorganize your thoughts, draft out a Plan B or C or whatever, and get back into the game. Are you going to let one little bump knock you down forever, or are you going to get back on your feet? If your dream is to serve, then you should make every effort to fulfill that desire.
     
  3. JGreenberg1191

    JGreenberg1191 IAmNumber 1191

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    As far as financial aid goes, I have narrowed my choices down to two schools; the #1 and #2 schools that I put on my application. My #1 has a revered NROTC program, and I spoke to the freshman adviser a few months ago. He told me all about the program and said that many who apply for the CP end up getting it by the spring of their freshman year. However, he said it was not a guarantee.
    My #2 school is still a fine institution, however their NROTC program is not as prestigious as my #1. However, the issue that is that my #2 school gave me a significant amount of money, while my #1 didn't give me a dime.
    I am just afraid if I risk going to my #1 and pursue the CP, I still won't get it, and that I will be up to my ears in debt until I'm in my 30s. However, if I take the safe route and pick my #2, I won't have the benefit of getting the same training and background that I would've had at my #1.
    As for getting back in the saddle, I'm still sure this is the route I want to pursue. I want to lead and serve the United States. I just don't want to keep chasing this dream if it means bankrupting my household in the process.
     
  4. unkown1961

    unkown1961 Member

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    Could you go to #2 with the intent of applying again to NROTC and also applying/transferring to your #1 choice for sophomore year?
     
  5. JGreenberg1191

    JGreenberg1191 IAmNumber 1191

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    That is an interesting option. I'll give it some thought
     
  6. beepybeetle

    beepybeetle H. pulchella

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    No dice negotiating aid? What @unkown1961 said is also an option. But also, does anyone know how much your NROTC unit's "prestige" actually effects your chances of getting into your desired warfare branch and subsequent career?
     
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  7. Oldsalt

    Oldsalt 5-Year Member

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    Prestige can mean a lot of things depending on perspective, but I believe the question you asking could be simplified giving an example. All things being equal, a Harvard grad is going to win a tie breaker against a University of Memphis grad. The number one UM graduate is going to select ahead of the last Harvard grad.
    I think most people would be surprised how many folks from every unit get their number one choice. We'll leave the discussion about if someone's ranking in their class drives positive selection for another time.
    On a side note: congrats BB on your opportunities. School selection should never be made based on a relationship. Go to the school that gives you the best chance of success in your desired path. You have some great choices.
     
  8. kinnem

    kinnem Moderator 5-Year Member

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    #2 and #1 schools lead to the exact same commission and you'll learn everything necessary to be a naval officer at either. The quality of a program is actually more about what you put into it. Once you commission, no one will care where you went to school. You'll further note there is no school emblem on a Navy uniform.

    With respect as to why you did not get a scholarship - you don't mention much leadership to my mind. Perhaps you neglected it but from what I saw that could be a reason why you didn't receive a scholarship. Certainly your major choice didn't help, but personally I think the smart move is picking the major you want and not one that will get you a scholarship.

    Participating in NROTC as a college programmer can help get you some leadership points. Most units begin giving freshman some leadership roles in their second semester. Work hard, get excellent grades, volunteer at every opportunity, max or get close to maxing the PFT, be a good shipmate, and you'll do fine and will also be doing the most that you can to get a scholarship. If my son can get a Marine Option sideload scholarship, anyone can get either a Navy or Marine sideload scholarship. It's doable.
     
  9. ProudDad17

    ProudDad17 Member

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    When my DS and I were visiting schools and their NROTC units last year before he applied for a scholarship, the advice he got from several units was to rank his order based on the quality of the school, not the NROTC unit. All units teach the same material and lead to the same commission. Yes, some units have better facilities than others and some units have long standing name recognition or traditions, but by and large the quality of the units can vary from year to year, due to turnover in unit staff and midshipmen.

    If your #2 school is a good academic fit and you feel like you will be successful there and they have offered you a financial aid package that will allow you to get your degree without a large amount of debt, whether or not you obtain a scholarship, that's where is would probably go, but you have to make that decision for yourself. As you said, there is no guarantee of a scholarship. The question I would ask myself is if I felt confident enough in earning a scholarship to go to my #1 school and take the chance of not earning it. Also remember, even if you do not get a scholarship, you can still apply for advanced standing and earn your commission that way. From what I've read there is a better chance that way than skipping ROTC and hoping for OCS.
     
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  10. NavyNOLA

    NavyNOLA Member

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    With a 1400 SAT, you'll be in a good position to earn an NROTC scholarship as a College Program mid this fall, regardless of tier. There are many reasons you may not have been selected this year, including the interview, but you'll certainly be more competitive as a College Programmer. If you're serious about earning one, start talking to the unit at the school(s) you're considering, if you haven't done so already.
     
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  11. kinnem

    kinnem Moderator 5-Year Member

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    Yeah, what ProudDad said.