Where do I start?

Discussion in 'Military Academy - USMA' started by CadetKJ, Aug 3, 2018.

  1. CadetKJ

    CadetKJ New Member

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    Hi everyone,

    I turn sixteen this saturday and I am going into my junior year of highschool. I'm younger for my class. As this is my junior year I'm really nervous about the whole 17 before July 1st deal, will I not be able to be accepted? I'm sixteen on August fourth, so in two days. I have a 3.96 cumulative GPA and I'm also involved in tennis and band and I'm also a band officer and I feel committed to getting into West Point, I'm scared they won't let me in because I'm turning seventeen next summer (going into my senior year). I also don't know where to start for the application so far, j want it so bad but it seems so overwhelming and I don't know where to begin. Thank you for taking the time to read this I hope you can help!
     
  2. Legna0407

    Legna0407 Member

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    I believe you have to be 17 by July 1st of the year you enter West Point, not to begin your application so no worries about that
     
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  3. CadetKJ

    CadetKJ New Member

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    i just had the biggest moment of relief. Thank you so much. It was hard to interpret for some reason for me on the website. Any recommendations for where to start with the application process?
     
  4. MidCakePa

    MidCakePa Member

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    It’s great to have such a lofty goal as West Point. If Legna0407 is right about the age minimum, then that issue is moot. Instead, focus on your words above, take a deep breath and considering the following:

    What do you “want so bad” — getting into West Point or becoming an Army officer? It should be the latter. If it’s not, then you’d better think things through a bit more. West Point is a means to an end — an officer’s commission — and it happens to be the hardest path. Make sure you understand that and embrace it.

    Are you really so “overwhelmed that you don’t know where to begin” or is that just hyperbole? Hopefully it’s the latter. Because while the whole process is daunting, no aspiring cadet/officer should be paralyzed by it. Simply start by going into West Point’s website and — as many here have advised — reading every single page, tab, link and pulldown. With just a few hours of review, you should know exactly where to start.

    Finally, know this: The academies want candidates who’ve put themselves in high-stress situations and succeeded. That means taking the hardest classes your school has to offer, playing varsity sports, accepting leadership challenges, and overcoming obstacles and rallying others to make an impact in your community. A lot is asked of candidates, because a lot will be asked of them as cadets and officers.

    You’re clearly excited by the prospect of attending West Point. Channel that (nervous) energy toward organizing yourself. Take it one step at a time. Best wishes to you.
     
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  5. brovol

    brovol Member

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    My son was seventeen until mid-September of his plebe year. That won't be an issue for you at all. Sat/ACT test scores, and your HS class standing are the largest single factors for admission, but the other factors are critical as well. Leadership is something you can establish during your junior year, by being involved in student government, NHS, and seeking high officer positions. Being a captain on a varsity sports team, like tennis, scores lots of points.

    Study and take the ACT/SAT as often as you can. Great scores can carry the day.

    Have a vision quest from now until you get a spot. Check out the application process on the West Point web page. Tons of info.
     
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  6. mia8297

    mia8297 New Member

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    I recommend SLE next summer...I believe applications become available for that right after the new year so monitor the website for announcements...until then do good in school, stay fit, try to find leadership and community service activities. Good Luck. It's a long process but good things come to those who diligently work hard towards their goals.
     
  7. GoCubbies

    GoCubbies Member

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    As a junior, you’ve got some time to prepare yourself.

    Read the book Absolutely American: Four Years at West Point by David Lipsky.

    The author follows a handful of cadets as they go through West Point. Well-written and a good read.

    My DD loved the book.
     
  8. prospective2019

    prospective2019 2023 Hopeful

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    Start going to regional admissions events. You will have the opportunity to meet your Regional Commander personally and ask him/her questions. Form a good relationship with these people, as they will help you a lot.

    Reach out to your Field Force Representative and introduce yourself. They too can be very helpful in the process.

    Become familiar with the nomination process specific to your district. It varies slightly.

    Research West Point. Watch YouTube videos (I recommend Austin LaChance) and read books. Read everything on their website and read material here (taken with a grain of salt.)

    Do a visit. I did one November of my junior year. You’ll know by the end if it’s a place you’re interested in.

    Apply for SLE, when you have the chance. It’s a good time, and you’ll learn a lot.

    Lift, run, and practice for the CFA.

    Think about teachers and school administrators who you would want writing you letters of recommendation and your SOE’s. Form good relationships with them, adults are much better to talk to than kids often give them credit.

    Perhaps most importantly, talk to cadets, talk to Old Grads, talk to servicemembers past and present, enlisted and officer. Decide if they are who you want to be and how you would want to lead them. Learn from veterans, who offer some of the most useful advice you can get.

    And while you’re doing all this, take the SAT AND the ACT, get more varsity letters and captainships, squeeze out that class presidency or otherwise.

    These are all things I did while anxiously awaiting my portal to open in January... they have all proven useful or meaningful in some way or another.
     
    Last edited: Aug 11, 2018
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